페이지 이미지
PDF
ePub

upon which the unhappy Phillis swooned away, and was immediately conveyed to her house. As soon as she caine to herself, she fled from her husband's house. went on board a ship in the road, and is now landed in inconsolable despair at Plymouth.

. - POSTSCRIPT. After the above melancholy narration, it may perhaps be a relief to the reader to peruse the following expostulation :

TO MR. SPECTATOR. · The just remonstrance of affronted THAT. • Though I deny not the petition of Mr. WHO and WHICH, yet you should not suffer them to be rude, and to call honest people pames : for that bears very hard on some of those rules of decency which you are justly famous for establishing. They may find fault, and correct speeches in the senate, and at the bar, but let them try to get themselves so often and. with so much eloquence repeated in a sentence, as a great orator doth frequently introduce me.

My lords ! (says he) with humble submission, That That I say is this ; That, That That gentleman has advanced, is not That, That he should have proved to your lordships. Let these two questionary petitioners try to do this with their Who's and their Whiches.

What great advantage was I of to Mr. Dryden in his Indian Emperor,

“ You force me still to answer you in That,” to furnish out a rhyme to Morat ? and what a poor figure would Mr. Bayes have made without his “ Egad and all That ?" How can a judicious man distinguish one thing from another, without saying “ This here,” or " That there?" And how can a sober man, without using the expletives of oaths, in which ideed the

. rakes and bullies have a great advantage over others) make a discourse of any tolerable length, without “ That is ;” and if he be a very grave man indeed, without “ That is to say?" And how instructive as well as entertaining are those usual expressions in the mouths of great men, “ Such things as That,” and “ The like of That.”

I am not against reforming the corruptions of speech you mention, and own there are proper seasons for the introduction of other words besides That; but I scorn as much to supply the place of a Who or a Which at every turn, as they are unequal always to fill mine and I expect good language and civil treatment, and hope to receive it for the future : That, That I shall only add is, That I am,

Yours,

R.

THAT.'

VOL. VII.

N° 81. SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 1711.

Qualis ubi audito venantum murmure tigris
Horruit in maculas

STAT. Theb. ii. 128.
As when the tigress hears the hunter's din,
Dark angry spots distain her glossy skin.

ABOUT the middle of last winter I went to see an opera at the theatre in the Hay-market, where I could not but take notice of two parties of very fine women, that had placed themselves in the opposite side-boxes, and seemed drawn up in a kind of battlearray one against another. After a short survey of them, I found they were patched differently; the faces on one hand being spotted on the right side of the forehead, and those upon the other on the left. I quickly perceived that they cast hostile glances upon one another; and that their patches were placed in those different situations, as party-signals to distinguish friends from foes. In the middle-boxes, between these two opposite bodies, were several ladies who patched indifferently on both sides of their faces, and seemed to sit there with no other intention but to see the opera. Upon inquiry I found that the body of Amazons on my right hand, were whigs, and those on my left, tories; and that those who had placed themselves in the middle boxes were a neutral party, whose faces had not yet declared themselves. These last, however, as I afterwards found, diminished daily, and took their party with one side or the other; insomuch that I observed, in several of them, the patches which were before dispersed equally, are now

all gone over to the whig or tory side of the face. The censorious say, that the men, whose hearts are aimed at, are very often the occasions that one part of the face is thus dishonoured, and lies under a kind of disgrace, while the other is so much set off and adorned by the owner; and that the patches turn to the right or to the left, according to the principles of the man who is most in favour. But whatever may be the motives of a few fantastical coquettes, who do not patch for the public good so much as for their own private advantage, it is certain, that there are several women of honour wlio patch out of principle, and with an eye to the interest of their country.Nay, I am informed that some of them adhere so stedfastly to their party, and are so far from sacrificing their zeal for the public to their passion for any particular person, that in a late draught of marriagearticles a lady has stipulated with her husband, that whatever his opinions are, she shall be at liberty to patch on which side she pleases.

I must here take notice, that Rosalinda, a famous whig partizan, has most unfortunately a very beautiful mole on the tory part of her forehead; which being very conspicuous, has occasioned many mistakes, and given a handle to her enemies to misrepresent her face, as though it had revolted from the whig interest. But, whatever this natural patch may seem to intimate, it is well known that her notions of government are still the same. This unlucky mole, however, has misled several coxcombs; and, like the hanging out of false colours, made some of them converse with Rosalinda in what they thought the spirit of her party, when on a sudden she has given them an unexpected fire, that has sunk them all at once. If Rosalinda is unfortunate in her mole, Nigranilla is as unhappy in a pimple, which forces her, against her inclinations, to patch on the wbig side,

upon which the unhappy Phillis swooned away, and was immediately conveyed to her house. As soon as she came to herself, she fled from her husband's house, went on board a ship in the road, and is now landed: in inconsolable despair at Plymouth.

POSTSCRIPT. After the above melancholy narration, it may perLaps be a relief to the reader to peruse the following expostulation :

TO MR. SPECTATOR.
· The just remonstrance of affronted THAT.

Though I deny not the petition of Mr. WHO and WHICH, yet you should not suffer them to be rude, and to call honest people names : for that bears very hard on some of those rules of decency which you are justly famous for establishing. They may find fault, and correct speeches in the senate, and at the bar, but let them try to get themselves so often and. with so much eloquence repeated in a sentence, as a great orator doth frequently introduce me.

• My lords ! (says he) with humble submission, That That I say is this ; That, That That gentleman has advanced, is not That, That he should have proved to your lordships. Let these two questionary petitioners : try to do this with their Who's and their Whiches.

What great advantage was I of to Mr. Dryden ip his Indian Emperor,

“ You force me still to answer you in That," to furnish out a rhyme to Morat ? and what a poor figure would Mr. Bayes have made without his “ Égad and all That ?" How can a judicious man distinguish one thing from another, without saying “ This here," or i That there?" And how can a sober man, without using the expletives of oaths, in which indeed the

« 이전계속 »