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iron and copper, but it is a little lower, that is, striking in pattern, were exhibited in a case at nearer to iron. There is thus a perfect analogy South Kensington, where they were regarded between the atomic weights and the color pro. only as an object of curiosity. Mr. Robert perties in this case. This analogy is even more Christie, recognizing its value as a material for general, for Mr. Bayley states that in the case the purposes for which it is now so largely used, of iron, cobalt, and copper, the mean wave and having at that time business connections length of the light absorbed is proportional to with Japan, at once endeavored to find out the the atomic weight. The specific chromatic makers there, with the view of getting it propower of the metals varies, being least for duced in a form more useful for European recopper. The specific chromatic power in- quirements. His efforts were so far successcreases with the affinity of the metal for oxy- ful that he was enabled to exhibit several rolls gen. Chromium forms three kinds of salts. of different patterns, measuring 3 feet wide by Pink salts, identical in color with the cobalt 36 feet long at the Exhibition in 1874, and for salts; blue salts, identical in color with copper which he obtained a medal. Since then Mr. salts; and green salts, complementary to the Christie has been in constant correspondence red salts.

with the makers in Japan, and, having had Manganese, in like manner, forms more practically the monopoly of its manufacture up than one kind of salt. The red salts of man to the present time, has used his influence in ganese are identical in color with the cobalt impressing on the the desirability of adhering salts, and with the red chromium salts. The as near as possible to their own old colors and salts of chromium and manganese, according designs. Although the manufacture of this to the author, are with difficulty attainable in material has been largely developed, its reproa state of chromatic purity. He thinks these duction has in no manner deteriorated, unlike properties of the metals lead up to some very other native productions both of India and interesting considerations,

Japan, where trade competition and indiscrim

inate orders have had such a banefulinfluence JA APANESE LEATHER PAPER. --Among the on their art work; the only deviation from this numerous forms in which Japanese art with the patchy and unsatisfactory appear

rule being as regards size, in order to do away has been so popularly represented in this country of late years there are few proving so prac- the original small pieces were used, particular;

ance which was found to be unavoidable where troduced at a time when startling innovations ly in cases where the pattern ought io, but did were being made in matters of taste, it readily Christie that its sale at the present time is

We are glad to hear from Mr. lent itself to the efforts of designers who were gifted with fresh and original ideas.

With no

largely increased both in this country and associations wedding it to any particular style,

America, and it is now regarded by an intell and with a character which neither asserts nor gent class of decorators as one of the mos obtrudes itself, it harmonizes with almost every promising staples of trade with Japan. style of decoration. The paper is rich and

HE Phosphor-Bronze Company held its generous in color and charming in design. Some have wonderful bits of detail, amidst a 1st inst. The directors declared a dividend of mass of suggested form and foliage; others 10 per cent. per annum, less the interim divishow more than a suspicion of European influ. dend242 per cent.-already paid. The di

One of the latest now before us has all rectors have devoted, they say, considerable the familiar features of the best old Spanish attention to several novel applications of phosleather, but accentuated in a manner both phor-bronze-amongst others, to its adaptability novel and characteristic. But whether drawn in the form of sheet, angle bars, and rivets, to from their own resources or elaborated on ac- the construction of steam launches and torcepted forms, they are peculiarly adapted for pedo boats; and having thought it desirable to the purposes for which we recommend them, make a practicable trial in this direction, they viz., interior decoration, such as dados, en have ordered a small steam launch to be built trance-halls, staircases, &c. But from their entirely of phosphor-bronze, to test its greater variety, both in design and color, they can also durability by reason of its resistance to the be used with fine effect wherever decoration is introduced. Apart from its value as a decor-Iture prove a success, there is every likelibood

oxidizing effect of sea water. Should the ven. ative agent, Japanese leather paper possesses of a considerable business developing in this in a large degree the desirable quality of dura- bianch. bility, and in this respect thoroughly deserves once fixed on a wall. The origin of this inten. The agreement amongst the coalowners of

Germany has been revived. Where the esting material in its present form may be re- limit of 45,000 tons in the output has not been garded as a legitimate outcome of one of our exceeded, the same production is allowed for International Exhibitions. Before 1872 speci. 1881. New members of the ring must undermens of the material were only to be found in take to reduce their output by 5 per cent., and the hands of dealers or collectors. But in to agree to a fine of 1f. 25c. for every ton above 1872 two or three pieces of the then orthodox 45,000. The fine is, however, iu no case to size, that is, 18 inches by 12 inches, in no way exceed 125,000f.

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One Volume, 8vo., Cloth Extra. 169 Pages. 96 Illustrations. $2.50.

ELECTRIC LIGHTING

BY

INCANDESCENCE,

AND ITS

APPLICATION TO INTERIOR ILLUMINATIONS.

A PRACTICAL TREATISE

BY

WM. EDWARD SAWYER.

CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTORY.
CHAPTER I. Generators of Electricity.
CHAPTER II, Generators of the Gramme Type.
CHAPTER III. Generators of the New Siemen’s Type.
CHAPTER IV. Incandescent Lamps.
CHAPTER V. Carbons for Incandescent Lighting.
CHAPTER VI and VII. New Forms of Lamps.
CHAPTER VIII. Preservation of Incandescent Carbons.
CHAPTER IX. Division of Current and Light.
CHAPTER X. Regulators and Switches.
CHAPTER XI. General Distribution.
CHAPTER XII. Commercial Aspects.

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A HAND-BOOK

OF THE

ITS

FUEL: Combustion & Economy. ELECTRO MAGNETIC

TELEGRAPH,

BY

ers.

Consisting of Abridgements of
“ Treatise on the Combustion of
Coal and the Prevention of

Smoke,
By C. W. WILLIAMS, A. I. C. E.

AND
“The Economy of Fuel,”

A. E. LORING.
By T. SYMES PRIDEAUX.
WITH EXTENSIVE ADDITIONS ON

A PRACTICAL TELEGRAPHER,
Recent Practice in the Combustion
and Economy of Fuel:

INTRODUCTION. COAL, COKE, WOOD. PEAT, PETROLEUM &c

It has been the aim of the author in the prepar. BY THE EDITOR, ation of this little book, to present the principles

, D. KINNEAR CLARK, C, E., concise manner, for the benefit of practical oper 12mo. Cloth, Illustrated. Price, $1.50. telegraphy, which have thus far been presented,

besides being expensive, have contained much that

is useless, or which is not in a form to be readily D. VAN NOSTRAND,

understood by young and inexperienced telegraphPublisher,

Although this little work must be acknowl

edged incomplete, it is hoped that it may go far 28 Murray & 27 Warren Streets,

toward supplying the deficiency which has existed ; NEW YORK.

or, at least, serve as a stepping-stone to the study Copies sent by mail on receipt of price.

of the more complete works on electricity and telegraphy.

THE AUTHOR.
WEALE'S

CONTENTS,
Part 1.- ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM.-Electricity-

Positive and Negative. Conductors and Non-Conduc.
tors. Galvanic Batteries. Galvanic Circuits. Elec-
trical Quantity and Intensity. Resistance. Electro-
Motive Force. Haskin's Galvanometer and its Uses.
Ohms Law. Measurement of Currents, Measure-
ment of Resistance. Speed of the Current. Divided
Circuits. Electro-Magnets. Residual Magnetism.

Proportion of Electri-Magnets !o Circuits. Intensity These highly popular and cheap series of and Quantity Magnets.

Part II.-THE MORSE TELEGRAPH.-Fundamental Prin. books, now comprising over Two Hundred ciple. Telegraph Circuits. Intermediate offices. The

Local Circuil. Ground Wires. The Key. The Relay. distinct works in almost every department of The Sounder. Main Line Sounders. The Box Relay.

Cut Outs. The Switch Board. Other Switches. Science, Art and Education, are recommended Lightning Arresters. Loops. Arrangement of Offices.

Arrangement of Batteries. Repeaters. to the notice of Engineers, Architects, Build Part 111.-BATTERIES.-Grove Battery. Carbon Bat.

tery. Amalgamation of Zincs. Daniell Battery. Hill ers, Artisans and Students generally, as well Battery. Other Forms of Battery. Battery lasu.

lators. as to those interested in Workmen's Libraries, Part IV.-PRACTICAL TELEGRAPHY.-Alphabet and Nu

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APPENDIX.-Suggestions and Exercises tor Learners.

Rudimentary Scientific Series

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The only Technological Journal published in the United States, without private pecuniary interest.

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