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Ah! well I knew that Mary,

council began thus : " The citizen Ternants and to call on me to say, whether I am a friend She had a tongue, she had a tongue. Once I had, &c. has delivered to me the letter, wherein you in to the French revolution, I would declare that

Tenche When spring is coming early,

form me, that yielding, &c. you had determined I have it in abhorrence.'' And skies are blue, and skies are blue;

to recal him from his mission, as your minister Coxe tells me, that a little before Hamilton And trees are budding fairly,

plenipotentiary to our republic. He had un- went out of office, or just as he was going out, And corn is new, and corn is new; What clouds the sunny morrow

derscored the words our republic.' He said, taking with him his last conversation; and, Of nature then, of nature then?

that certainly ours was a republican govern- among other things, on the subject of their And turns young hope to sorrow?

ment; but yet we had not used that style in differences, . For my part,' says he, ' I avow Oh, fickle men ! oh, fickle men! Once I had a true love,

this way; that if any body wanted to change myself a monarchist; I have no objection to a I loved him well, I loved him well;

its form into a monarchy, he was sure it was trial being made of this thing of a republic; But since he's found a new love, only a few individuals ; and that no man in but,' &c.

In conversation with Alone I dwell, alone I dwell."

the United States would set his face against it Baldwin, and Brown of Kentucky, Brown With these examples we consign the work to more than himself; but that this was not says, that in a private company once, consist. the applause of the public, and to the unques. what he was afraid of : his fears were from ing of Hamilton, King, Madison, himself, and tioned admiration of all the lovers of excellent another quarter ; that there was more danger some one else making a fifth, speaking of the fictions. It is at once entertaining and full of of anarchy being introduced. He adverted to federal government, Oh!' says Hamilton, judicious remarks upon the people of Ireland a piece in Freneau's paper of yesterday: he: say the federal monarchy; let us call things and many subjects of literature and importance said he despised all their attacks on him per- by their right names, for a monarchy it is."". which are connected with them : in short, it is sonally, but that there never had been an act In 1798, when Adams was president, Mr. a performance equally agreeable and instruc- of the government, not meaning in the execu- Jefferson relates, that in a conversation with tive. There is also much originality in Mr. tive line only, but in any line, which that him," he said that no republic could ever last Griffin's Tales ; he is no copyist of the com. paper had not abused. He had also marked which had not a senate ; and a senate deeply mon Irish characters

, but an able delineator of the word republic thus , where it was applied and strongly rooted, strong enough to bear up real manners.

to the French republic. He was evidently sore against all popular storms and passions; that

and warm ; and I took his intention to be, that he thought our senate as well constituted as it Jefferson's Memoirs and Correspondence. 8vo. I should interpose in some way with Freneau, could have been, being chosen by the legisla.

Vols. Ill. and IV. London, 1829. Col. perhaps withdraw his appointment of trans- tures—for if these could not support them, he burn and Bentley.

lating clerk to my office. But I will not do it. did not know what could do it ; tbat perhaps The two concluding volumes of this valuable His paper has saved our constitution, which it might have been as well for them to be contribution to the history of an important was gallopping fast into monarchy, and has chosen by the state at large, as that would period have just appeared, and continue to be been checked by no one means so powerfully as insure a choice of distinguished men, since as attractive as the two which preceded them. by that paper. It is well and universally known, none but such could be known to a whole Volume III. resumes the correspondence of that it has been that paper which has checked people ; that the only fault in our senate was, Mr. Jefferson during his residence at Paris at the career of the monocrats; and the President, that it was not durable enough ; that hitherto the sanguinary times of the French Revolu- not sensible of the designs of the party, has not, it had behaved very well ; however, he was tion (commencing with a letter to Mr. Jay, with his usual good sense and sang froid, looked afraid they would give way in the end. That July 19th, 1789); and his unvarnished, though on the efforts and effects of this free press, and as to trusting to a popular assembly for the prefavouring, accounts of the atrocities committed seen that, though some bad things have passed servation of our liberties, it was the merest before his eyes, convey the most horrible ideas through it to the public, yet the good have chimera imaginable ; they never had any rule of those diabolical transactions. But we avoid preponderated immensely."

of decision but their own will; that he would political topics; and for this reason also abstain In August this subject is revived by another as lief be again in the hands of our old comfrom similar discussions in the ensuing letters, attack.

mittees of safety, who made the law, and exe. written by Mr. Secretary Jefferson, at New “ Knox, in a foolish, incoherent sort of a cuted it at the same time; that it had been York, Philadelphia, &c. 1790, 1, 2, 3, 4, and speech, introduced the pasquinade lately printed, observed by some writer (I forget whom he subsequent years. Our extracts, therefore, called the funeral of George W—n and James named), that anarchy did more mischief in one must be miscellaneous, and less calculated to W-n, king and judge, &c., where the Presi- night than tyranny in an age; and that in afford an accurate idea of the work than if we dent was placed on a guillotine. The President modern times we might say with truth, that went into its more prominent features. was much inflamed, got into one of those pas in France anarchy had done more harm in one

“ February 16th, 1793. E. Randolph tells sions when he cannot command himself ; ran night than all the despotism of their kings J. Madison aud myself a curious fact, which on much on the personal abuse which had been had ever done in twenty or thirty years." he had from Lear. When the President went bestowed on him ; defied any man on earth to The following bon-mot and anecdote relate to New York, he resisted for three weeks the produce one single act of his since he had been to the same person :efforts to introduce levees. At length he in the government, which was not done on the “ At a dinner given by the bar to the yielded, and left it to Humphreys, and some purest motives ; that he had never repented federal judges Chase and Peters, present about others, to settle the forms. Accordingly, an but once the having slipped the moment of re- twenty-four lawyers, and William Tilghman antechamber and presence-room were pro- signing his office, and that was every moment in the chair, this toast was given, 'Our king vided; and when those who were to pay their since; that, by God, he had rather be in his in old England.' Observe the double entendre court were assembled, the President set out, grave than in his present situation ; that he on the word king.

In a conversapreceded by Humphreys. After passing through had rather be on his farm than to be made em- tion between Doctor Ewen and the President, the antechamber, the door of the inner room peror of the world; and yet that they were the former said one of his sons was an aristowas thrown open, and Humphreys entered charging him with wanting to be a king. That crat, the other a democrat. The President first, calling out with a loud voice, the Pre- that rascal Freneau sent him three of his asked if it was not the youngest who was the sident of the United States.' The President papers every day, as if he thought he would democrat? Yes,' said Ewen. Well,' said was so much disconcerted with it, that he did become the distributor of his papers ; that he the President, • a boy of fifteen who is not a not recover it the whole time of the levee ; could see in this nothing but an impudent de democrat is good for nothing; and he is no and when the company was gone, he said to sign to insult him: he ended in this high better who a democrat at twenty.'". Humphreys, “Well, you have taken me in tone. There was a pause. Some difficulty in A short space for so great a change !! once, but, by God, you shall never take me in resuming our question; it was, however, after Another story of infant etiquette in making a second time.'

a little while, presented again, and he said states. The importance of a free press is put in a there seemed to be no necessity for deciding it “ June 10th, 1793. Mr. Brown gives me strong light by the annexed : now."

the following specimen of the frenzy which “ May 23d. I bad sent to the President So that even thus early there were great dif- prevailed at New York on the opening of the yesterday draughts of a letter from him to the ferences between republican Washington and new government. The first public ball which Provisary Executive Council of France, and of republican Jefferson, both presidents of the took place after the President's arrival there, one from myself to Mr. Ternant, both on the New World.

Colonel Humphreys, Colonel W. S. Smith, occasion of his recal. I called on him to-day. Hamilton was almost, if not entirely, mo. and Mrs. Knox, were to arrange the cere. He said there was an expression in one of narchical ; for, says our author :

monials. These arrangements were as folthem, which he had never before seen in any “ E. Randolph tells me, that Hamilton, in low:- a sofa at the head of the room, raised of our public communications, to wit, • our conversation with him yesterday, said, “Sir, if on several steps, whereon the President and republic. The letter prepared for him to the all the people in America were now assembled, Mrs. Washington were to be seated. The

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for which, not the tenants of the air, but the of a manner and appearance very different from triot, and you have set others down that air itself, has been laid under tribute. The that of Mr. Damer. He was tall and well thwarted you, and you hope to be a great man magnificently gilded covers of a quarto edition proportioned, dressed very plainly, with a red, some day or another. And on the score of of Henry's Bible lay on his right hand, re- laughing countenance, and two large black your own darling passion, the study of human flecting the light of four wax candles, which eyes, which seemed to be always rambling in nature, what say you ? This is a kind of ana. were supported in candlesticks of massive sil- search of amusement. · Well, Damer,' said tomy you cannot study without subjects. The ver, richly carved. A solid and elegant side- Mr. Leonard, the gentleman just described, more men you know, the more you'll know of baard was loaded with all the splendours of the I totally disagree with you in every one of their nature. But I have got one subject family plate and glass. On a secretaire, at a your plans. I think you will do no service continually within my reach, and which I can little distance from the table, were placed a whatever to the peasantry, I think you do not dissect at will,' said Francis, laying his finger quantity of books in plain dark binding, and understand them sufficiently. (Mr. Damer over his heart. · Did Jean Jacques Rousseau—' stamped on the covers with the impress of the smiled.) I think though they are ignorant. The wretch, the quack, the hypocrite, the Society for the diffusion of Christian Know. and naked (poor fellows !), and Papists to boot, knave, the coward! You make my blood tingle ledge. In a corner, less brilliantly illumined, they have as fair a chance of going to heaven to my fingers' ends to hear him named.' the eye of the curious observer might detect a as the best of ourselves; that is my idea, poor Well, well, he knew the heart, however,' parcel of small pamphlets, stitched in blue devils ! even though they do break out now said Francis, smiling at her energy; and did corers

, and bearing on their title-pages the and then; human nature is human nature; he find it necessary to expose himself to the various denominations of “ The Dairyman's and my idea is, that all the funds and sub. dangers of collision with the mob of men ? He Dangbter,' “ The Conversion of Timothy De- scriptions in the world will not get half a laid his own heart bare, and found it a mirror lany from the Errors of the Church of Rome,' dozen more souls into heaven than were on of the whole species. Who knew more of the * The Lough Derg Pilgrim, a Tale,' 'Father their way before. Half a dozen is the out- heart than Massillon ? and yet every body was Clement, a Roman Catholic story,' and many side.' And would not the salvation of one,' surprised where a quiet priest could have found ether productions of a similar tendency. There said Mr. Damer, lifting the cote roti to his such extensive opportunities of observation. was something in the air of the whole apart. lips, be worth the whole cost, and all the But what says D'Alembert to that? Massillon ment that was calenlated to impress the be- exertions of the Society together? • Be worth painted all his splendid gallery of sinners and of bolder with an instantaneous conviction of the sixty thousand a year?' Sixty million!' saints—his magnificent portrait of the true wealth, the self-contentedness, and the piety of Besides the bickerings and heartburnings Christian_his appalling picture of the infidel the owner. It had little of mere fashion, but that have broken up the frame of society in his lukewarm devotee-his false penitent-a great deal of that species of luxury which in our country, the division of families, the his Mary Magdalen_his sensualist-all from England is denominated comfort, and in Ire. sundering of early attachments, the fomenta- the same original, all from the close study of land falls little short of magnificence. The tion of civil disunion, and the diffusion of his own single heart; and yet so true to the person of the proprietor was entirely in cha- all uncharitableness in private life? My idea life, that there breathes no soul in human form racter, or, in the cant of connoisseurs, in keep- is, that for the one soul we save by this busi- that may not find itself reflected in his pages as ing with his possessions. His hair was short ness, we lose fifty.' · For shame, Tom,' said in a faultless mirror.' I read none of your and sleek, his head round as a bullet, his face Mrs. Damer, you are growing worse and papistical sermons,' said Esther ; “ but friend påump and peachy, his eyes meek and sancti- worse every day! I don't pretend to any D'Alembert, and the other eulogists of that Dorions, with a little spark of earthly fire, great sanctity,' said Leonard. - You, my fair French priest, have overlooked one circum. (the result of some harmless and habitual self- and fat and sanctimonious sister, know me a stance that might have lessened their wonder indulgence,) gleaming unsteadily through the long time, and know me to be a blunt plain as to the source of his knowledge.' " And what paril, like the pæta of the Venus Erycina. fellow, that thinks he does his duty when he was that, I pray you ?' • The confessional.' Ha legs, shining in black silk, were crossed, so takes care of his neighbour's body, and leaves Esther,' said Francis, after bending his eyes 23 to expose the calf to the influence of a his soul between him and his Creator. There on her for a moment in silence, you have ebeerful coal-fire, and a bunch of fine gold is the difference between us. Damer is as struck me dumb,' • You were dumb already. seals reposed on an incipient paunch. No honest a fellow as any body, but his charity all I had rather strike you talkative. If you hope ollar, starched and impudent, obscured the evaporates in smoke. If I find a poor fellow to write a good book, or to be a great orator, Bushing rotundity of his beardless jaws; a starving on my estate, why (Heaven forgive you must talk with all, listen with all, and malin cravat, of the purest white, alone en- me !) I think I do my duty when I send him a learn to please all. Put Jean Jacques ont of eiched bis short neck-for he had the good taste leg of mutton, and make him an abatement; your head. What has all his moping availed o sit in full dress to his wine. Thus cushioned while Damer smothers him with books and him but to win the admiration of all the mor

the zephyrs, not in the poetical, but the Bibles, and I don't know what. Here's my bid sentimentalists in Europe ?-to crown him practical, sense of the phrase, sipping his cote idea. "Give the people bread, and they'll find king of the day dreamers? But that stageeti

, and glancing occasionally, while the con- out piety themselves : make them prosperous, playing fellow near you used his eyes and ears
Fensation proceeded, at the columns of a Dublin and you may be sure they will grow virtuous as well as his imagination ; and what has been
daily paper, sat Mr. Kirwan Damer, the owner without much labour. But hunger and cold his recompense ? Universal empire.'
this mansion, and of the adjoining estate of are the sorriest Martexts in the world." » In conclusion, we must quote some of the
Glendearg, in the county above intimated. To There is much acuteness and spirit in a dia- very pretty poetry with which these volumes
heighten the domestic picture, in a lounger, on logue between one of the heroes and heroines ; are adorned.
the opposite side of the fire-place, sat Mrs. Da- but we can only give a snatch of it. The lover

“ You never bade me hope 'tis true,
mer, as well conditioned as her husband, dressed is being reproved by his young mistress for bis I asked you not to swear;
like him in black, with a trim cap of white too common contempt of general society.

But I looked in those eyes of blue,
mudin surrounding her fair and full and 66 + I will be candid, Esther. There are many

And read a promise there.
rather languid countenance. The lady, too, among them that I think hardly worth the pain's The vow should bind with maiden sighs
was reading. But that we have already suf- of pleasing.' “ There you are very wrong again,

That maidan lips have spoken

But that which looks from maiden eyes
fered the names to escape us, the reader might Francis,' said Esther with considerable warmth ; Should last of all be broken!"
appose that we were describing a wealthy you are bound to love them all, the poor and
erre and his belpmate, in their handsome rich, the mean and the noble, the dull no less « Once I had a true love,
parlou at the Glebe. He would be, however, than the gifted, the vicious as well as the holy.
tails in error. Mr. Damer was merely an The dullest man you meet does his utmost to

Alone I dwell, alone I duell.
brish country gentleman of our own time. The please you, and you should do as much by him.
March has vanished, the Canfinny is forgotten, What book is that near you with the leaf turned

How oft we've wandered lonely,
the chiefs of their race are no more regarded, down? A volume of Shakespeare.'

Through yon old glen, through yon old glen; · And

I was his treasure only,
le duelist, the drunkard, the libertine, and what says that stage-playing fellow? Does he

And true love then, and true love then:
the railer
, have all been exiled from the pale not bid you use men better than they deserve,

But Mary's singing brought me

To sigh all day, to sigh all day;
of Irish society, or compelled to wear their for the lesser their desert the greater is your Oh, had my mother taught me
vices in a veil." 'A class of men has succeeded, merit in using them well ? On the score of To sirg and play, to sing and play!
to which sea those who have an interest in its Christianity, Esther-nay, on the score of ino-

Once I had, &c.
Thication must accord a preference. Those rals—1 plead guilty ; but I never set up for a

By lone Glencree at even,

I passed him late, I passed him late;

A glance just sidelong given
dezid know the Dancers. On the other side speech. And on the score of patriotism, what
- the table, near Mrs. Damer, sat a gentleman I say you ? You have set yourself up for'a pa-

His step no longer airy,

His head it hung, his head it hung;

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I loved him well, I loved him well;
But since he's found a new love,

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Told all his fate, told all his fate:

Ah! well I knew that Mary,

council began thus : The citizen Ternant and to call on me to say, whether I am a friend She had a tongue, she had a tongue. Once I had, &c. has delivered to me the letter, wherein you in to the French revolution, I would declare that

Tenche When spring is coming early,

form me, that yielding, &c. you had determined I have it in abhorrence.' And skies are blue, and skies are blue;

to recal him from his mission, as your minister Coxe tells me, that a little before Hamilton And trees are budding fairly,

plenipotentiary to our republic. He had un- went out of office, or just as he was going out, And corn is new, and corn is new; What clouds the sunny morrow

derscored the words our republic.' He said, taking with him his last conversation; and, Of nature then, of nature then?

that certainly ours was a republican govern- among other things, on the subject of their And turns young hope to sorrow?

ment; but yet we had not used that style in differences, “For my part,' says he, I avow Oh, fickle men! oh, fickle men!

this way: that if any body wanted to change myself a monarchist; I have no objection to a Once I had a true love, I loved him well, I loved him well;

its form into a monarchy, he was sure it was trial being made of this thing of a republic ; But since he's found a new love, only a few individuals ; and that no man in but,' &c.

In conversation with Alone I dwell, alone I dwell."

the United States would set his face against it Baldwin, and Brown of Kentucky, Brown With these examples we consign the work to more than himself; but that this was not says, that in a private company once, consist. the applause of the public, and to the unques- what he was afraid of : his fears were from ing of Hamilton, King, Madison, himself, and tioned admiration of all the lovers of excellent another quarter ; that there was more danger some one else making a fifth, speaking of the fictions. It is at once entertaining and full of of anarchy being introduced. He adverted to federal government,” Oh!' says Hamilton, judicious remarks upon the people of Ireland a piece in Freneau's paper of yesterday: he say the federal monarchy; let us call things and many subjects of literature and importance said he despised all their attacks on him per- by their right names, for a monarchy it is."" which are connected with them: in short, it is sonally, but that there never had been an act In 1798, when Adams was president, Mr. a performance equally agreeable and instruc- of the government, not meaning in the execu- Jefferson relates, that in a conversation with tive. There is also much originality, in Mr. tive line only, but in any line, which that him," he said that no republic could ever last Griffin's Tales; he is no copyist of the com- paper had not abused. He had also marked which had not a senate; and a senate deeply mon Irish characters, but an able delineator of the word republic thus V, where it was applied and strongly rooted, strong enough to bear up real manners.

to the French republic. He was evidently sore against all popular storms and passions; that

and warm ; and I took his intention to be, that he thought our senate as well constituted as it Jefferson's Memoirs and Correspondence. 8vo. I should interpose in some way with Freneau, could have been, being chosen by the legisla.

Vols. Ill. and IV. London, 1829. Col- perhaps withdraw his appointment of trans- tures—for if these could not support them, he burn and Bentley.

lating clerk to my office. But I will not do it. did not know what could do it; that perhaps The two concluding volumes of this valuable His paper has saved our constitution, which it might have been as well for them to be contribution to the history of an important was gallopping fast into monarchy, and has chosen by the state at large, as that would period have just appeared, and continue to be been checked by no one means so poiverfully as insure a choice of distinguished men, since as attractive as the two which preceded them. by that paper. It is well and universally known, none but such could be known to a whole Volume III. resumes the correspondence of that it has been that paper which has checked people ; that the only fault in our senate was, Mr. Jefferson during his residence at Paris at the career of the monocrats; and the President, that it was not durable enough ; that hitherto the sanguinary times of the French Revolu- not sensible of the designs of the party, has not, it had behaved very well; however, he was tion (commencing with a letter to Mr. Jay, with his usual good sense and sang froid, looked afraid they would give way in the end. That July 19th, 1789); and his unvarnished, though on the efforts and effects of this free press, and as to trusting to a popular assembly for the prefavouring, accounts of the atrocities committed seen that, though some bad things have passed servation of our liberties, it was the merest before his eyes, convey the most horrible ideas through it to the public, yet the good have chimera imaginable ; they never had any rule of those diabolical transactions. But we avoid preponderated immensely."

of decision but their own will; that he would political topics ; and for this reason also abstain In August this subject is revived by another as lief be again in the hands of our old com. from similar discussions in the ensuing letters, attack.

mittees of safety, who made the law, and exe. written by Mr. Secretary Jefferson, at New “ Knox, in a foolish, incoherent sort of a cuted it at the same time; that it had been York, Philadelphia, &c. 1790, 1, 2, 3, 4, and speech, introduced the pasquinade lately printed, observed by some writer (I forget whom he subsequent years. Our extracts, therefore, called the funeral of George Wến and James named), that anarchy did more mischief in one must be miscellaneous, and less calculated to W-n, king and judge, &c., where the Presi- night than tyranny in an age; and that in afford an accurate idea of the work than if we dent was placed on a guillotine. The President modern times we might say with truth, that went into its more prominent features. was much inflamed, got into one of those pas in France anarchy had done more harm in one

“ February 16th, 1793. E. Randolph tells sions when he cannot command himself ; ran night than all the despotism of their kings J. Madison aud myself a curious fact, which on much on the personal abuse which had been had ever done in twenty or thirty years." he had from Lear. When the President went bestowed on him ; defied any man on earth to The following bon-mot and anecdote relate to New York, he resisted for three weeks the produce one single act of his since he had been to the same person :efforts to introduce levees. At length he in the government, which was not done on the “ At a dinner given by the bar to the yielded, and left it to Humphreys, and come purest motives ; that he had never repented federal judges Chase and Peters, present about others, to settle the forms. Accordingly, an but once the having slipped the moment of re- twenty-four lawyers, and William Tilghman antechamber and presence-room were pro- signing his office, and that was every moment in the chair, this toast was given, “ Our king vided ; and when those who were to pay their since; that, by God, he had rather be in his in old England.' Observe the double entendre court were assembled, the President set out, grave than in his present situation ; that he on the word king.

In a conversapreceded by Humphreys. After passing through had rather be on his farm than to be made em. tion between Doctor Ewen and the President, the antechamber, the door of the inner room peror of the world; and yet that they were the former said one of his sons was an aristowas thrown open, and Humphreys entered charging him with wanting to be a king. That crat, the other a democrat. The President first, calling out with a loud voice, the Pre- that rascal Freneau sent him three of his asked if it was not the youngest who was the sident of the United States.' The President papers every day, as if he thought he would democrat ? Yes,' said Ewen. “Well,' said was so much disconcerted with it, that he did become the distributor of his papers ; that he the President, a boy of fifteen who is not a not recover it the whole time of the levee ; could see in this nothing but an impudent de- democrat is good for nothing; and he is no and when the company was gone, he said to sign to insult him: he ended in this high better who is a democrat at twenty." Humphreys, We

Well, you have taken me in tone. There was a pause. Some difficulty in A short space for so great a change !! once, but, by God, you shall never take me in resuming our question; it was, however, after Another story of infant etiquette in making a second time.""

a little while, presented again, and he said states. The importance of a free press is put in a there seemed to be no necessity for deciding it “ June 10th, 1793. Mr. Brown gives me strong light by the annexed : now."

the following specimen of the frenzy which “ May 23d. I had sent to the President So that even thus early there were great dif- prevailed at New York on the opening of the yesterday draughts of a letter from him to the ferences between republican Washington and new government. The first public ball which Provisary Executive Council of France, and of republican Jefferson, both presidents of the took place after the President's arrival there, one from myself to Mr. Ternant, both on the New World.

Colonel Humphreys, Colonel W. S. Smith, occasion of his recal. I called on him to-day. Hamilton was almost, if not entirely, mo. and Mrs. Knox, were to arrange the cereHe said there was an expression in one of narchical ; for, says our author :

monials. These arrangements were as folthem, which he had never before seen in any “ E. Randolph tells me, that Hamilton, in low:- a sofa at the head of the room, raised of our public communications, to wit, • our conversation with him yesterday, said, “Sir, if on several steps, whereon the President and republic, The letter prepared for him to the all the people in America were now assembled, I Mrs. Washington were to be seated. The gentlemen were to dance in swords. Each for the public can soon discriminate between lowed in less than two years after his escape at one, when going to dance, was to lead his the hand of a master and that of his follower; Kilquane, is thus related by Mr. M'Gregor :-partner to the foot of the sofa, make a low it is in history and topography that book- Kerry was his next place of refuge ; and obeisance to the President and his lady, then making becomes an evil, for thus are errors here he lay concealed for some time, with a few go and dance; and, when done, bring his perpetuated ; and, trifling as a name or date trusty servants, in a wood near Tralee, compartner again to the foot of the sofa for new may be considered, a want of accuracy in either, pelled to support himself and his followers at obeisances, and then to retire to their chairs. at once destroys our confidence in the authen- the expense of the neighbouring peasantry. It was to be understood, too, that gentlemen ticity of other statements.*

Among various depredations committed by should be dressed in bags. Mrs. Knox con- The patient and laborious investigations of them, some cattle were taken from a poor rived to come with the President, and to fol- the antiquary, and the minute details of the woman named Moriarty. She complained to low him and Mrs. Washington to their destina- honest biographer, have been too often unjustly her brother, who applied to the English gotion; and she had the design of forcing an turned into ridicule; for who is there that can vernor of Castlemain for assistance. The goinvitation from the President to a seat on the deny the important results produced by cir- vernor granted him seven musketeers and sofa. She mounted up the steps after them cumstances apparently unworthy of attention ? twelve horsemen, under the command of one anbidden; but, unfortunately, the wicked sofa Who, for instance, that is intimately acquainted Kelly, an Irishman, who followed the track of was so short, that when the President and with the particulars of the late extraordi- the cattle, till they came to a wood four miles Mrs. Washington were seated, there was not nary Clare election can doubt that the wearing east of Tralee, where they resolved to take up room for a third person ; she was obliged, of a bit of lead, called a " liberator medal,

” their quarters for the night; but perceiving a therefore, to descend in the face of the com- occasioned the return of Mr. O'Connell ? and to fire not far off, they advanced towards it, and pany, and to sit where she could. In other his return has been (justly or not, it is impos- discovered six persons sitting in a ruined house. respects the ceremony was conducted rigor. sible for us to say) ascribed the measure of They all fled at the entrance of the soldiers, ously, according to the arrangements; and the Catholic emancipation. To offer a topographi- except an old man, whom Kelly struck with President made to pass an evening, which his cal illustration of the same argument, we hap- his sword, and nearly cut off his arm; upon good sense rendered a very miserable one to pen to know that the Chain Bridge across the which his wretched victim exclaimed, - Spare kim.”

Thames at Hammersmith owes its existence to my life, for I am the Earl of Desmond !' But The annexed, if true, will change many an a joke at a supper-table.

finding that the earl would be unable to travel opinion respecting Washington.

Mr. M'Gregor's present volume embraces from loss of blood, his executioner bade him “ Dr. Rush tells me that he had it from the history of Ireland under the Tudors; and prepare for death, and then struck off his head, Asa Green, that when the clergy addressed is carefully compiled from common sources in which was sent to England, and fixed upon General Washington on his departure from an agreeable and rather anecdotical manner London bridge. Kelly was rewarded for this the government, it was observed in their con- but the curse of the copyist hangs over him. service with an annual pension of £20; but he sultation, that he had never, on any occasion, Unlike his great original, whose little volumes was afterwards hanged at Tyburn." said a word to the public which shewed a every where shed new rays upon history, those Circumstantial as this account, even in Mr. belief in the Christian religion, and they of Mr. M'Gregor faithfully hand down the M'Gregor’s abridgment, appears to be, we can thought they should so pen their address as blunders and errors of his predecessors. We inform him, that the Earl of Desmond fell, not to force him at length to declare publicly could point out many, but will content our- by the hand of Kelly, but by that of Donald whether he was a Christian or not. They selves with a single example, as no doubt the M'Donald Imorietaghe, on the 11th of Novem. did so. However, he observed, the old fox History of Ireland announced as in preparation ber, 1584:--and thus might we proceed. was too cunning for them. He auswered every by Mr. Moore for Dr. Lardner's Cyclopædia, The following quotation affords at once a fair article of their address particularly, except will correct the various mistakes and misrepre- specimen of Mr. M'Gregor's style and the that, which he passed over without notice. sentations of former historians, who have done lawless state of Ireland : the period to which it Rashe observes, he never did say a word on little more than copy one from the other, with refers is the close of Henry VIII.'s reign. de subject in any of his public papers, except out reference to a single original or authentic “ Commercial jealousies raged to such an in his valedictory letter to the governors of the document. Mistakes and misprints in Cox's extent during this reign, between the principal states, when he resigned his commission in the History, which was published in the reign of sea-ports on the southern and western coasts of arty, wherein he speaks of the benign in- William III., are repeated in Leland ; and Ireland, as frequently to occasion fierce hostili. frence of the Christian religion.' I know that where Dr. Leland blunders, there Mr. M'Gre- ties both by sea and land. A war of this na. Guverneur Morris, who pretended to be in gor is wrong also. The example we take will ture was carried on for twelve years between kis secrets, and believed himself to be so, has be circumstances connected with the death of the merchants of Limerick and Galway, which etter told me that General Washington be- the Earl of Desmond, in the reign of Eliza- was attended with some bloodshed, and termi. ered no more of that system than he himself beth. The Christmas of 1582 he is repre- nated only by the interposition of the crown.

sented by all historians as lurking in the wood Another piratical war was carried on between Be this we understand that Washington of Kilquaig, near Kilmallock, in the county of Waterford and some of the ports in the neighEsbelieved the Christian dispensation ; and Limerick, where he was attacked, his followers bourhood of Cork, in which many instances of bare not a word to add.

slain, and the earl, with his countess, escaped bravery were displayed which would have been by concealing themselves, up to their necks in creditable to regular forces. Take the follow. water, under the bank of a river.

ing as an instance. On the 20th of February, True Stories from the History of Ireland. By

Now, it oddly enough happens, that Mr. 1537, four ships laden with Spanish wines, and John James M'Gregor. Second Series.

M'Gregor (if we are not very much mistaken) consigned to the merchants of Waterford, were lemo. Pp. 412. Dublin, Curry and Co.

has recently published a topographical bistory driven by a tempest into Cape Clear, Kinsale, WAEX Sir Walter Scott edited ballads, every of the very county where this event is repre- and Baltimore. Sir Fineen O'Driscol, the de collected old songs—when he wrote poetry, sented to have taken place, and was, therefore, hero of this part of the coast, had his residence ETETT one composed verses - when he appeared we should have supposed, peculiarly qualified to at the castle of Dunalong, or the Ship.castle, a a novelist, all the would-be authors, nay, correct the statement in Cox and others, and on the island of Innisherkin; and his name was erea swe of a higher grade, who had acquired to inform us that no such place as Kilquaig dreaded from the Bristol channel to the mouth a certain reputation, turned novel writers; and exists in the county of Limerick - although of the Shannon. The prizes which he and his ra the master-spirit of our age became the there is a portion of the parish of Kilquane, a natural son Gilly Duff, or Black Gilbert, took bor of a little history for little people, we mile east of Kilmallock, which, from the dis- by sea or land, were stored up in the ShipTere prepared to expect a due proportion of covery of numerous human bones, and its local castle; and here open house was kept for the Fuvesile histories. Now, there is no reason character, is, beyond question, the place alluded gentry and pedlars, who came from all quarters Why volumes of ballads, of poetry, of novels, to. And thus has a misprint (for it is no more) to purchase bargains of wine, brandy, drapery, ad ef historiettes, should not be published; but been allowed to remain uncorrected for more or other goods—the produce of their piracies. shy, we ask, were not these ballads collected, than a century.

On the tempestuous night above mentioned, these teries composed, and these novels and The Earl of Desmond's death, which fol. Gilly Duff was rowing along the shore in his historietta sritten, before Sir Walter Scott's

launch, when the Santa Clara appeared in dispublications? _What we complain of, is the

* Notwithstanding what we have said, the attention tress at the entrance of Baltimore harbour. spirit of imitation which pervades our litera- will do something towards making future historians accu:

now bestowed even by the romance writer upon history. He approached to offer assistance, and proposed, tare. A copy, however cleverly executed, is rate. We may refer to Miss Crumpe's Geraldine of for three tuns of wine, to bring her safely into Eid a copy. In works of fancy, this mean and laboured through some scores of volumes, as well as many port. The bargain was struck, and in less

Desmond;" to produce which, the fair writer must have maglorious rivalry is of little consequence, original papers.

than an hour she was securely moored under the castle of Dunalong. The captain and crew | painted by Cooper, and as well engraved by discovered it, as he has done a multitude of expressed gratitude for their deliverance, and Raddon, enhance its value. We find only one valuable documents, in the State Paper Office; Gilly Duff increased it by inviting them to the new note ; in which Sir W. Scott, speaking of and the kind attentions paid by Mr. Peel, castle, where, he said, the fire of hospitality the elfin traditions peculiar to the wild scenery amid all the weighty affairs of politics, to the was never out on his father's hearth. The where the Avon-Dhu, or River Forth, has its interests of literature - one of the noblest captain and his wearied mariners gladly ac- birth, observes, that the opinions entertained chaplets with which a minister can bind his cepted the invitation, and enjoyed the food and about these beings are much the same with brow. festivity of Sir Fineen O'Driscol, till, sunk in those of the Irish, so exquisitely well narrated sleep and wine, they left their vessel to her by. Mr. Crofton Croker; and he continues-- The Library of Entertaining Knowledge. fate. They were instantly clapt in irons, the “ An eminently beautiful little conical hill, Vol. III. Part II. Insect Architecture. galleys of Gilly Duff boarded the vessel, and near the eastern extremity of the valley of London, 1829. C. Knight. before morning every pipe of wine which she Abertoil, is supposed to be one of their peculiar This new Part is truly deserving of its title, contained was stored in the vaults of the castle, haunts, and is the scene which awakens, in for it conveys much entertaining knowledge or the cellars of the adjoining Franciscan con- Andrew Fairservice, the terror of their power. while it pursues the interesting exposition of vent. When the merchants of Waterford re-It is remarkable that two successive clergymen insect architecture, certainly one of the most ceived intelligence of this act of piracy, they of the parish of Aberfoil have employed them- curious branches of entomological inquiry. As equipped a well-armed vessel, which sailed on selves in writing about this fairy superstition. in the preceding Part, the subject is most ably the 3d of March for Baltimore, under the com- The eldest of these was Robert Kirke, a man treated; and the multitude of wood engravings mand of Captain Dobbyn ; wlio coming up sud. of some talents, who translated the Psalms render the study of these extraordinary creadenly with the Santa Clara, boarded her on into Gaelic verse. He had formerly been mi.. tures in all their wonderful ways as obvious as one side, while Gilly Duff with his men fied nister at the neighbouring parish of Balquid- it is interesting. We could not open a page out at the other : and after firing several guns der, and died at Aberfoil in 1688, at the early any where without falling upon extracts to at the castle, Dobbyn brought off his prize. age of forty-two. He was author of the Se- justify this high opinion; but as the generality But this was not a sufficient satisfaction to the cret Commonwealth, which was printed after of our readers will probably procure the work Waterford merchants for the insult and injury his death, in 1691-an edition which I have itself, we shall confine our examples to those which they had sustained; they, therefore, fitted never seen—and was reprinted in Edinburgh, limits which will, we trust, sufficiently illusout a squadron of three ships, well appointed 1815. This is a work concerning the fairy trate its general character, without occupying and victualled, and manned by four hundred people, in whose existence Mr. Kirke appears so large a proportion of our page as we should men, which sailed for Baltimore, under the to have been a devout believer. He describes otherwise be tempted to allot to its merits. The command of Captains Woodlock and Dobbyn. them with the usual powers and qualities very first page is a fair specimen : the chapter Sir l'ineen O'Driscol and the inmates of Duna- ascribed to such beings in Highland tradition. treats of the clothes-moth and other tent-making long castle were still carousing over the Spanish But what is sufficiently singular, the Rev. caterpillars; and the writer says: " There are wines, when at day-dawn, on a fine April morn- Robert Kirke, author of the said treatise, is at least five different species of moths similar ing, the watch-tower bell gave notice that a believed himself to have been taken away by in manners and economy, the caterpillars of hosiile squadron was in sight, and in a few the fairies, in revenge, perhaps, for having let which feed upon animal substances, such as minutes they cast anchor before the castle. in too much light upon the secrets of their furs, woollen cloths, silk, leather, and, what The battlements were instantly manned, and commonwealth. We learn this catastrophe to the naturalist is no less vexing, uppn the all the artillery of the fortress opened its fire from the information of his successor, the late specimens of insects and other animals preon the ships : but this was answered with such amiable and learned Dr. Patrick Grahame, served in his cabinet. The moths in question effect by Woodlock's little squadron, that a also minister at Aberfoil, who, in his Sketches are of the family named Tinea by entomolobreach was speedily made; and the Waterford- of Perthshire, has not forgotten to touch upon gists, such as the tapestry moth ( T'inea tapet. ians, led on by Lieut. Grant, rushed to the the Daoine Shie, or men of peace. The Rev. zella), the fur moth (Tinea pellionella), the storm with a resolution that proved irresistible Robert Kirke was, it seems, walking upon a wool moth (Tinea vestianella), the cabinet -forced the barbacan, burst into the castle, little eminence to the west of the present moth (Tinea destructor, Stephens), &c. The and hoisted St. George's standard on the top of manse, which is still held a Dun Shie, or moths themselves are, in the winged state, the tower. Sir Fineen O'Driscol had already fairy mound, when he sunk down, in what small

, and well fitted for making their way made his escape to Dunboy; but Gilly Duff, seemed to mortals a fit, and was supposed to through the most minute hole or chink, so that it perceiving that all was lost, resolved to perish be dead. This, however, was not his real fate. is scarcely possible to exclude them by the close. in the ruins of the castle. Seizing a flaming Mr. Kirke was the near relation of Graham ness of a wardrobe or a cabinet. If they canbrand, he applied it to a powder barrel, and of Duchray, the ancestor of the present Ge- not effect an entrance when a drawer is out, or both victors and vanquished were instantly neral Graham Stirling. Shortly after his fu- a door open, they will contrive to glide through launched into eternity. Grant alone stood un neral, he appeared in the dress in which he the key-hole; and if they once get in, it is no injured, in a recess of one of the tower win. had sunk down, to a medical relation of his easy matter to dislodge or destroy them, for dows, while the flames were crackling around, own, and of Duchray. "Go,' said he to him, they are exceedingly agile, and escape out of and burning beans and melting lead falling on to my cousin Duchray, and tell him that I sight in a moment. Moufet is of opinion that every side. At that moment Lieut. Butler, am not dead. I fell down in swoon, and the ancients possessed an effectual method of seeing the perilous condition of his gallant com- was carried into Fairyland, where I now am. preserving stuffs from the moth, because the rade, seized a cross-bow, and fastening a cord Tell him, that when he and my friends are as robes of Servius Tullius were preserved up to to a steel bolt, shot it up to Grant, who tying sembled at the baptism of my child (for he had the death of Sejanus, a period of more than it to the stone mullion of the window, slided left his wife pregnant), I will appear in the five hundred years. On turning to Pliny to down in a moment, and found himself secure room ; and that if he throws the knife which learn this secret, we find him relating, that stuff in the arms of his companions. The men of he holds in his hand over my head, I will be laid upon a coffin will be ever after safe from Waterford continued five days on the island, released, and restored to human society.' The moths; in the same way as a person once stung during which they captured or destroyed seventy man, it seems, neglected for some time to de- by a scorpion will never afterwards be stung by pinnaces belonging to O’Driscol, ruined the liver the message. Mr. Kirke appeared to a bee, or a wasp, or a hornet! Rhasis again castle and convert, and returned in triumph, him a second time, threatening to haunt him says, that cantharides suspended in a house loaded with booty.

night and day till he executed his commission, drive away moths; and, he adds, that they

- which at length he did. The time of the will not touch any thing wrapped in a lion's The Waverley Novels. Vol. VIII. Rob Roy. baptism arrived. They were seated at table ; skin ;— the poor little insects, says Réaumur

Vol. II. Edinburgh, 1830, Cadell and Co.; the figure of Mr. Kirke entered; but the sarcastically, being probably in bodily fear of London, Simpkin and Marshall.

Laird of Duchray, by some unaccountable so terrible an animal. Such are the stories Tuis publication goes on most prosperously-fatality, neglected to perform the prescribed which fill the imagination even of philosophers, 80 prosperously, indeed, as to be a subject of ceremony. Mr. Kirke retired by another door, till real science entirely expels them. The continued wonder even to those most sanguine and was seen no inore. It is firmly believed etfluvium of camphor or turpentine may some. in bookselling, and the greatest admirers of that he is at this day in Fairyland.'"

times kill them when in the winged state, but the genius of the author. The present vo. postscript contains the Duke of Montrose's this will have no effect upon their eggs, and lume, concluding the delightful novel of Rob original letter to the government relative to seldom upon the caterpillars ; for they wrap Roy, has very little of additional literary il. the seizure of Killearn while collecting his themselves up too closely to be easily reached lustration; though the frontispiece from Les-rents; and with great propriety mentions the by any agent except heat. This, when it can lie, and a viguette, with two horses charmingly indefatigable zeal of Mr. Robert Lemon, who l be conveniently applied, will be certain either

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