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B. But if, on the other hand, the recovery all times there have been pretenders, who takes place under the care of a Homeop- have persuaded a certain part of the public athist, or any other empiric, the circum- that they have some peculiar knowledge of stance excites a much larger portion of at- a royal road to cure, which those of the tention; and we really cannot very well regular craft have not. It is Homeopathy wonder that, with such knowledge as they now; it was something else formerly; and possess of these matters, the empiric should if Homeopathy were to be extinguished, gain much credit with the public.

there would be something else in its place. So far the practical result would seem to The medical profession must be contented be that Homeopathy can be productive of let the thing take its course; and they no great harm; and, indeed, considering it will best consult their own dignity, and the to be no treatment at all, whenever it is a good of the public, by saying as little as substitute for bad treatment, it must be the possible about it. The discussions as to the better of the two. But there is great harm evils of Homøopathy which have sometimes nevertheless. There are numerous cases in taken place at public meetings, have quite which spontaneous recovery is out of the an opposite effect to that which they were question: in which sometimes the life or intended to produce. They have led some death of the patient, and at other times to believe that Homeopathists are rather a the comfort or discomfort of his existence persecuted race, and have given to the sysfor a long time to come, depends on the tem which they pursue an importance which prompt application of active and judicious it would never have had otherwise ; just as treatment. In such cases, Homeopathy is any absurd or fanatical sect in religion neither more nor less than a mischievous would gain proselytes if it could only make absurdity; and I do not hesitate to say that others believe that it was an object of jeala very large number of persons have fallen ousy and persecution. After all, the harm victims to the faith which they reposed in it, done to the regular profession is not so great and to the consequent delay in having re- as many suppose it to be; a very large procourse to the use of proper remedies. It is portion of the complaints about which Hotrue that it very rarely happens, when any mæopathists are consulted being really no symptoms show themselves which give real complaints at all, for which a respectable alarm to the patient or his friends, that they practitioner would scarcely think it right to do not dismiss the Homeopathist and send prescribe. for a regular practitioner; but it may well There was a time when many of the medbe that by this time the mischief is done, ical profession held the opinion that not only the case being advanced beyond the reach Homeopathy, but all other kinds of quackof art.

ery, ought to be put down by the strong That the habit of resorting to Homeop- hand of the law. I imagine that there are athic treatment which has prevailed in very few who hold that opinion now. The some parts of society should have occa- fact is, that the thing is impossible; and sioned much dissatisfaction among the mass even if it were possible,—as it is plain that of medical practitioners, is no matter of the profession cannot do all that is wanted wonder. It cannot be otherwise than pro- of them, by curing all kinds of disease, and voking, to those who have passed three or making men immortal,—such an interference four years of the best part of their lives in with the liberty of individuals to consult endeavoring to make themselves well ac- whom they please would be absurd and quainted with disease, in the wards of a wrong. As it now is, the law forbids the hospital, to find that there are some among employment in any public institution of any their patients who resort to them for advice one who is not registered as being a qualionly when their complaints have assumed a fied medical practitioner, after a due examimore painful or dangerous character; while nation by some of the constituted authorithey are set aside in ordinary cases, which ties; and it can go no further. The only involve a smaller amount of anxiety and re-effectual opposition which the medical prosponsibility, in favor of some Homæopathic fession can offer to Homeopathy, is by indoctor, who, very probably, never studied dividually taking all possible pains to avoid, disease at all. But it cannot be helped. In on their own part, those errors of diagnosis

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by means of which, more than any thing est. The object of a medical consultation is else, the professors of Homæopathy thrive the good of the patient; and we cannot supand flourish ; by continuing in all ways to pose that any such result can arise from the act honorably by the public; at the same interchange of opinions, where the views time, never being induced, either by good- entertained, or professed to be entertained, nature or by any motives of self-interest, to by one of the parties as to the nature and appear to give their sanction to a system treatment of disease, are wholly unintelligiwhich they know to have no foundation in ble to the other. reality. To join with Homeopathists in at

I am, dear sir, tendance on cases of either medical or sur

Yours, etc., gical disease, would be neither wise nor hon

B. C. BRODIE.

A New STIMULANT.— Attention has lately considerable quantity of coco-leaves, with which been redirected in medical circles towards the it was intended to experiment in the army and valuable properties which the leaves of the navy. Nothing has been made public of the reerythroxylon coca are reported to possess in sults of these experiments, but it is possible their power of preserving human life and that, in another European war, these leaves may strength without any other food. The shrub is exercise a decided influence on the results of largely cultivated in several South American battles. Propositions have been repeatedly States, and it has been fully proved by the tes- made, in Europe, to introduce them in the navy, timony of many travellers and physicians that and to cause emigrant and other ships to supply the Indians and working men in the above themselves with coca-leaves, so that the crew named countries, who are subject to great hard- and passengers, in cases of accident or disaster, ships, habitually chew the leaves along with the may by keeping up their strength, have increasalkaline ashes of some plants, or with a little ed chances of being ultimately saved. The dose lime, and are thereby enabled to endure an of coca-leaves is about one drachm, which is in. amount of fatigue without food or sleep, which creased in the most fatiguing hardships to not would appear almost incredible were the facts over half an ounce, and is renewed after two oj not well authenticated. Tschudi employed an three hours. Persons unaccustomed to it require Indian for excavations for five days and five less. nights in succession, who, during this entire A moderate use of coca-leaves does not seem time, ate no food, and only slept for two hours to have any injurious effect upon the constitaat night; immediately afterwards he accom- tion, as the Indians of Peru, who habitually inpanied his temployer (who was on horseback), dulge in it, generally live to a great age; but an and travelled on foot, in two days, a distance of excessive indulgence, like all other excesses, will sixty-nine English miles. During all this time gradually undermine the bodily health. he merely chewed coca-leaves, and then ex- From all reports by reliable authorities, it pressed his willingness to endure the same hard- seems evident that coca-leaves may become a ships again, provided he was supplied with these valuable medicine, and that it deserves at least leaves. An Indian, in the employ of Scherzer, a trial in a military campaign, where an army travelled the distance from La Pazto to Taena, of perhaps a hundred thousand men may be ex250 English miles, in four days, then, after rest- posed in a warm climate to all the hardships and ing one day, returned in five days, over a moun- privations incidental to war. tain 13,000 feet in height; he partook of no The consumers of coca-leaves are estimated food except coca-leaves and some roasted maize. at ten millions, and they use thirty millions of During the wars, in 1817, when the Spaniards pounds annually.-- London Review. were cut off from all supplies, and had to be constantly prepared for fight, they subsisted almost entirely on coca-leaves, thereby retaining DISINTERESTED ADVICE TO LADIES OF A their vigor, and preserving themselves from LITERARY Turx. - Never marry an author. starvation and annihilation by a vigorous foe. He is sure at some time or other to put you in The horses of travellers, who are accompanied his books, and the consequence is, you will on foot through the deserts by Indian guides, come out, like those rare botanical specimens who chew their coca-leaves, frequently break similarly preserved, as flat, and as dead as posdown on hot days from exhaustion, when their sible. Not a fraction of color will there be left in guides are still able to travel many miles. The you! There will only be the withered outline, by miners, amid deadly metallic exhalations, and which you will be able to trace your original in an unfavorable climate, preserve by coca not beauty only their strength, but also their health ; and In fact, a wife to an author is only so much the bearers of burdens travel through marshes book-muslin to enable him to dress up his charand over steep rocks, where horses and mules acters with. To clothe others, the wretch does cannot go. The Austrian frigate Novara brought, not scruple to cut up his own wife.—The Hermit some ycars ago, from her scientific expedition, a of the Haymarket.Punch.

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From The Saturday Review. | Brown, one of the pilgrim fathers, and both CAPTAIN JOHN BROWN. *

his grandfathers had been officers in the This little book has many merits as a bi- Revolutionary War. His father moved ography. It is plain, modest, and carefully west when he was five, and was one of the put together, is written with a hearty and first pioneers in Ohio. John would always intelligent sympathy for the man of whom it sooner stay at home and work hard than go speaks, and the cause for which he lived and to school, and at twelve, “ to be sent off died, and allows him to speak as much as alone through the wilderness, sometimes possible in his own words, and tell his own more than a hundred miles with companies story, without lumbering the narrative with of cattle was his great delight, barefooted a mass of irrelevant gossip and so-called and bareheaded, with buckskin breeches contemporary history. Besides the chief suspended often with one leather strap over figure, the book gives a slight but vivid and his shoulder, but sometimes with two." truthful sketch of a group of families, of a When war broke out with England, his type which cannot perhaps now be paralleled father supplied beef to the army. John visin any other part of the world ; of good de- ited the camp, and was so disgusted with scent, and gentle in blood and manners, what he saw, that he refused to drill for the poor in this world's goods and with no de- militia, and paid fines for exemption until sire for wealth, and living a primitive and past the age for service. On this occasion patriarchal life; a simple, God-fearing soci- he saw a negro boy of his own age, who had ety, tilling and subduing the earth quietly, done him numerous little acts of kindness, until they are brought face to face with the brutally used, beaten with an iron shovel by great question which is tearing their nation a man in whose house he was staying, and in pieces, and then taking their part in a who made a great pet of Brown. To this spirit of the noblest heroism and self-sacri- he himself attributed his first hatred of fice. The whole story carries us back near slavery, which grew into a belief that “he three thousand years, and we can almost had a commission direct from God to act fancy ourselves standing by the herdsman against it.” Unlike many abolitionists, he of Tekoa, and hearing his answer to King had a high opinion of the negroes, who, he Amaziah, “I was no prophet, neither was I said quaintly, “ behaved so much like folks, a prophet's son; but I was an herdsman, he almost thought they were so." But until and a gatherer of sycamore fruit; and the past middle life he had no opportunity of Lord took me as I followed the flock, and doing more than helping individuals; at said unto me, ‘Go, prophesy unto my people last in 1849, the opening he had been so Israel.'"

long waiting for presented itself. The book, too, is singularly well timed. Up to that time, he had been a well-to-do We are full of scorn and disgust at the pan- farmer and tanner, rigidly upright in his ics, the exaggeration, the coarse bluster and dealings, and skilful in business, though he purposeless action of the Americans. It is never accumulated much money. He was well that we should get this glimpse into the twice married, and the father of fourteen heart of New England; and never was sons and six daughters, who had been reared there a time when Englishmen had more in his own strong faith, and intense hatred need to fix their eyes steadily on any exam- of slavery. In 1849, Mr. Gerrit Smith, of ple, come from what quarter it will, of faith New York, a rich and well-known abolitionwhich goes beneath wrangling and specula- ist, offered plots of ground in the Adirondtion, and holds ease and goods and name and ack Mountains to colored settlers, and Brown life as a trust to be used, kept, or cast away wrote to him: “I see by the newspapers at the call of Him who has bestowed them.

that have offered so many acres of land We will give a short sketch of the life of to each of the colored men on condition they Captain John Brown in the hope of leading cultivate them. Now, they are mostly inreaders to the book itself.

experienced in this kind of work, and unJohn Brown was born in 1800, in Connec- used to the climate, while I am familiar with ticut. He was sixth in descent from Peter both. I propose, therefore, to take a farm

* Life and Letters of Captain John Brown. there myself, clear and plant it, showing the Smith and Elder.

negroes how such work should be done. I 771

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will also employ some of them on my land,“ border ruffian” law prevailing, and were and will look after them in all ways, and be plundered and insulted. They wrote to their a kind of father to them."

father “to procure such arms as might ena His proposal was accepted, and he moved ble them in some degree to protect themto the black farm of North Elba, in the selves, and personally bring them to KanAdirondacks, where his family still live, sas." where corn will not grow, and cattle have to John Brown procured arms, started be housed six months in the year. Before at once, and arrived in Kansas in the authis time, however, in fact, as early as tumn of 1855. Pierce, the then President 1839,-he had made up his mind that slav- of the Union, now openly sided with the ery could not be put down without a fight, slaveholders, who thus gained the upper and had studied drill and military works to hand for a time. In October, at the elecprepare himself for the struggle which he tions, a crowd of ruffians, “the Missouri foresaw, and would never engage in any mud scarcely dry on their boots," with rifles business which could not be wound up hon- in their hands, knives in their belts, bottles orably on short notice.

in their pockets, and whiskey in their belIn May, 1854, the "territory " of Kansas, lies, swaggered round the polls, drinking in defiance of the Missouri Compromise, and shouting in exultation over their triwas thrown open to slaveholders, and was umph.” The Free State settlers were not at once inraded by bands of “ border ruf- yet thoroughly roused. Attempts were made fians," as they soon came to be called (and on Lawrence, the stronghold of the Free rejoiced in the name themselves), who State settlers in the winter. In May, 1856, passed over into Kansas from Missouri and the United States marshal, at the head of other Slave States. The temper of these eight hundred men, entered the town on men may be judged from their leaders. pretence of making arrests. The arrests General Stringfellow, speaking in Missouri were submitted to peaceably, the marshal to a force of them about to start for Kan- dismissed his men, by whom in twenty-four sas, exhorts them thus: “I tell you to mark hours the town was sacked. From this every scoundrel among you who is the least time civil war raged, and the free settlers tainted with abolitionism or free-soilism, and formed themselves into companies : one at exterminate him. Neither give nor take Prairie City, under John Brown, described quarter from the damned rascals. To those by Mr. Redpath, is worth looking at as a who have qualms of conscience as to violat- contrast to the Missouri ruffians : “ Brown ing laws, state or national, I say the time himself stood near the fire with his shirthas come when such impositions must be dis- sleeves rolled up, and a large slice of pork regarded, as your rights and property are in his hand. He was cooking a pig. He in danger. I advise you, one and all, to en- was poorly clad, and his toes protruded from ter every election district in Kansas, in de- his boots. . . . In this camp no profane lanfiance of Reeder (the governor of Kansas guage was permitted, no man of immoral appointed by the United States) and his character was allowed to stay, except as a myrmidons, and vote at the point of the prisoner of war. He made prayers in which bowie-knife and revolver. Neither take nor all the company united every morning and give quarter, as the cause demands it. It evening, and no food was ever tasted by his is enough that the slaveholding interest wills men until the divine blessing had been asked it, from which there is no appeal.” General on it., Often, I was told, he returned to the Stringfellow was mistaken. There were sev- densest solitudes to wrestle with God in eral appeals open to the Kansas free-settlers prayer. . . . He said to me, I would rather

to the United States Government, to their have the small-pox, yellow fever, and cholown friends at home, and to the Judge of era altogether in my camp than a man withall the earth. They carried their cause to out principles. It's a mistake, sir, that our each of these courts, failed in the first, and people make when they think bullies are were successful in the other two. Amongst the best fighters, or that they are the men others, four sons of John Brown were on fit to oppose these Southerners ; give me their way to Kansas. They had no arms God-fearing men--men who respect themwith them. On their arrival they found ! selves—and with a dozen of them I will op

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pose any hundred such men as those Buford bly the last opportunity you will have of ruffians."

seeing a fight, so that you had better do Not the sort of men, these, one would your best. If they should come up to atcare to be fighting with. So their enemies tack us, don't yell and make a great noise, found; they soon were marked men. A but remain perfectly silent and still. Wait certain Captaiu Pate and his company cap- till they get within twenty-five yards of you, tured two of Brown's sons, sacked and burnt get a good object, be sure you see the hind their houses, and treated them so brutally sight of your gun, then fire. A great deal that one of them went mad. Within a few of powder and lead, and very precious time days, Brown, with twenty-three men, at- is wasted by shooting too high. You had tacked Pate's company of sixty, entrenched better aim at their legs than their heads, in a strong position, with a ravine behind but in either case be sure of the hind sight and a breastwork of wagons in front, and of your gun.” After which characteristic completely routed them, taking Pate and speech, he led out the one hundred men twenty-one men, besides wounded, prisoners. who had rifles, routed the advanced guard

In August, Captain Brown and “Preacher of four hundred, and the rest drew off. Steward,” another free leader, united their In October, 1856, “the ruffians” having companies, and, with sixty men, attacked a retired from Kansas, Brown visited the Eastcamp of one hundred and sixty Missourians ern States, to get funds for properly arming with the like result, taking thirteen prison- and equipping one hundred mounted men, ers, their whole baggage, and one hundred and for purchasing arms and ammunition. stands of arms. On the 30th, a detachment The object of his journey, to a great extent, of five hundred Missourians under General failed. He left again for Kansas, in April, Reid, marched suddenly on the town of Os- 1857, in deep sadness; a paper in his handsowatomie, near which Captain Brown's writing, entitled “Old Brown's Farewell to camp lay. They shot his son Frederick in the Plymouth Rocks,'•Bunker Hill Moncold blood on their way. He had just time uments,' • Charter Oaks,' and Uncle Tom's to throw himself with thirty men (half of Cabin,'” shows how bitterly he felt this failwhom were almost without ammunition and ure. But his spirit was as brave as ever. retired early in the fight) into the wood in His brother " urged him to go home to his front of the town. Before they were driven family, and attend to his private affairs. I back across the river with a loss of two feared his course would prove his destruckilled and three wounded, they had left tion, and that of his boys.” He replied “he thirty-two dead and fifty wounded of the was sorry I did not sympathize with him. enemy on the field. The Missourians sacked That he knew that it was in the line of his Ossowatomie and returned in triumph to duty, and must pursue it, though it should their own state ; but, it is said, that the destroy him and his family." To another sight of the killed and wounded, when the influential abolitionist who helped him, he number of Brown's men who had fought remarked, “I believe in the Golden Rule, them crept out, spread a feeling of terror sir, and the Declaration of Independence. through Missouri which had no small influ- I think they both mean the same thing; and ence in freeing Kansas.

it is better that a whole generation should The tide was turning ; Lane and Stevens pass off the face of the earth—men, women, were victorious in other parts of Kansas, and children-by a violent death, than that but again Lawrence was threatened, while one jot of either should fail in the country. only two hundred men could be mustered I mean exactly so, sir.” And in this temper for the defence. Brown was in the town, the old man went back to Kansas in the and they unanimously voted him the com- spring, where he had already lost one son, mand. He mounted on a packing-case, and had another son and son-in-law desperately addressed his men: “Gentlemen,- It is said wounded, and a third son driven mad by illthere are twenty-five hundred Missourians usage, and where he and his had lost their down at Franklin, and that they will be here whole disposable property. in two hours. You can see for yourselves He found Kansas comparatively quiet, and the smoke they are making by setting fire on his return the Missourians who had to the houses in that town. This is proba- I been threatening the border withdrew. He

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