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Ror. Barbarian | yes, I will for ever shun thee. Repeated injuries have steeled my heart, And I could curse myself for being kind. If there is any majesty above, ’ That has revenge in store for perjured love, Send, Heaven, the swiftest ruin on his head; Strike the destroyer! lay the victor dead! But what are curses? curses will not kill, Nor ease the tortures I am doomed to feel!

Alex. Oh, my fair star, I shall be shortly with

thee . What means this deadly dew upon my forehead 2 My heart too heaves Cas. The poison works.

Enter EUMENEs.

Eum. Pardon, dread sir, a fatal messenger: The royal Sysigambis is no more. Struck with the horror of Statira's fate, She soon expired, and with her latest breath Left Parisatis to Lysimachus. But, what I fear most deeply will affect you, Your loved Hephestion's— Aler. Dead then he is blest! But here, here lies my fate. Hephestion' Clytus! My victories all for ever folded up In this dear body. Here my banners lost, My standard's triumphs gone. Oh, when—Oh, when Shall I be mad indeed . [Exeunt all but CAssanDER and THEssaLus. Cass. He's gone—but whither? Follow, Thessalus, Attend his steps, and let me know what passes. [Exeunt THEssaLus and CAssanDER, separately.

SCENE II,

An Anti-chamber in the Palace.

Enter CASSANDER.

Cass. Vengeance, lie still, thy cravings shall Be sated ;

Death roams at large, the furies are unchain'd,

And murder plays his mighty master-piece.

Enter PolyPERcHoN,

Saw you the king? .
Poly. Yes; with disordered wildness in his looks,
He rushed along, till with a casual glance
He saw me where I stood; then stepping short,
Draw near, he cried—and grasped my hand in his,
Where more than fevers raged in every vein.
Oh, Polyperchon ' I have lost my queen!
Statira's dead!—and, as he spoke, the tears
Gushed from his eyes—I more than felt his pains.

Enter THEssaLUs.

Thes. Hence, hence, away !

Cas. Where is he, Thessalus 2

Thes. I left him circled by a crowd of princes. The poison tears him with that height of horror, Ev’n I could pity him—He called his chiefs,

Embraced them round—then, starting from amidst them,

Cried out, I come—'twas Ammon's voice—I know it—

Father, I come; but let me, ere I go, -
Despatch the business of a kneeling world!

Poly. No more; I hear him—we must meet anon. Cas. In Saturn's field—there give a loose to rapture, o the tempest we ourselves have raised, And triumph in the wreck which crowns our vengeance. [Ereunt.

SCENE ini.

The Palace.

ALExANDER, with his hair dishevelled, Lysimachus,
EUMENEs, PERDIccAs, &c. discovered.

Aler. Search there; nay, probe me, search my wounded reins— Pull, draw it out. Lys. We have searched, but find no hurt. Aler. Oh, I am shot! a forked burning arrow. Sticks cross my shoulders: the sad venom flies Like lightning thro' my flesh, my blood, my marrow ! Lys. How fierce his fever! Aler. Ha! what a change of torments I endure : A bolt of ice runs hissing thro' my bowels; "Tis sure the arm of death; give me a chair; Cover me, for I freeze, and my teeth chatter. And my knees knock together. Eum. Have mercy, Heaven! Alex. Who talks of Heaven? I burn, I burn again l The war grows wondrous hot: hey for the Tigris! of Bear me, Bucephalus, amongst the billows. . . - [Jumps into the chair.

Oh, 'tis a noble beast! I would not change him
For the best horse the sun has in his stable;
For they are hot, their mangers full of coals,
Their manes are flakes of lightning, curls of fire,
And their red tails like meteors whisk about.
Lys. Help, all; Eumenes, help !
Aler. Ha! ha! has I shall die with laughter.
Parmenio, Clytus, do you see yon' fellow,
That ragged soldier, that poor tattered Greek?
See how he puts to flight the gaudy Persians,
With nothing but a rusty helmet on, through which
The grisly bristles of his pushing beard .
Drive them like pikes—Ha! ha! hal
Per. How wild he talks :
Lys. Yet warring in his wildness.
Aler. Sound, sound ! keep your ranks close. Ay,
now they come;
Oh, the brave din, the noble clang, of arms!
Charge, charge apace, and let the phalanx move.
Darius comes—ay, 'tis Darius,
I see, I know him by the sparkling plumes,
And his gold chariot, drawn by ten white horses;
But, like a tempest, thus I pour upon him
He bleeds! with that last blow I brought him
down :
He tumbles; take him, snatch th' imperial crown.
They fly, they fly!—Follow, follow—Victoria!
Victorial Victoria

[Leaps into the Soldier's Arms. Per. Let's bear him softly to his bed. Aler. Hold, the least motion gives me instant death; My vital spirits are quite parched, burnt up, And all my smoky entrails turned to ashes. Lys. When you, the brightest star that ever shone, Shall set, it must be night with us for ever. Alex. Let me embrace you all before I die. [All kneel and weep. Weep not, my dear companions! the good gods Shall send you in my stead a nobler prince, One that shall lead you forth with matchless conduct. Lys. Break not our hearts with such unkind expressions. Per. We will not part with you, nor change for Mars. Aler. Perdiccas, take this ring, And see me laid in the temple of Jupiter Ammon. Lys. To whom does your dread majesty bequeath The empire of the world? Aler. To him that is most worthy. Per. When will you, sacred sir, that we should We To yoot memory those divine honours ... Which such exalted virtue does deserve? Aler. When you are all most happy and in peace. Your hands—Oh, father 1 if I have discharg'd The duty of a man to empire born ; If, by unwearied toils, I have deserv'd The vast renown of thy adopted son, Accept this soul, which thou didst first inspire, And which this sigh thus gives thee back again! [Dies.—Ereunt.

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