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Ant. And so am I too.

Isaac. Well, perhaps he'll save time, and marry us both together or I'll be your father, and you shall be mine. Come along-but you're obliged to me for all this. Ant. Yes, yes.

[Exeunt.

SCENE V.

A Room in the Priory.-FRIARS at the Table,

drinking.

GLEE AND CHORUS.

This bottle's the sun of our table,

His beams are rosy wine;
We, planets, that are not able,

Without his help to shine.
Let mirth and glee abound,
.. You'll soon grow bright,

With borrow'd light,
And shine as he goes round.
Paul. Brother Francis, toss the bottle about, and
give me your toast.

Francis. Have we drank the abbess of St Ursuline? Paul. Yes, yes; she was the last.

Francis. Then I'll give you the blue-eyed nun of St Catharine's.

Paul. With all my heart. (Drinks.] Pray, brother Augustine, were there any benefactions left in my absence?

Francis. Don Juan Corduba has left a hundred ducats, to remember him in our masses.

Paul. Has he! let them be paid to our wine mere

chant, and we'll remember him in our cups, which will do just as well. Any thing more?

Aug. Yes ; Baptista, the rich miser, who died last week, has bequeathed us a thousand pistoles, and the silver lamp, he used in his own chamber, to burn before the image of St Anthony.

Paul. 'Twas well meant, but we'll employ his money better-Baptista's bounty shall light the living, not the dead.St Anthony is not afraid to be left in the dark, though he was -See who's there.

[A Knocking, FRANCIS goes to the Door,
and
opens

it. Enter PORTER, Porter. Here's one without in pressing haste to speak with Father Paul.

Francis. Brother Paul !
[PAUL comes from behind a Curtain, with a Glass

of Wine, and in his Hand a Piece of Cake. Paul. Here ! how durst you, fellow, thus abruptly break in upon our devotions ?

Porter. I thought they were finished.

Paul. No, they were not-were they, Brother Francis ?

Francis. Not by a bottle each.

Paul. But neither you nor your fellows mark how the hours go-no, you mind nothing but the gratifying of your appetites; ye eat and swill, and sleep, and gormandize, and thrive, while we are wasting in mortification.

Porter. We ask no more than nature craves.

Paul. 'Tis false, ye have more appetites than hairs ! and your flushed, sleek, and pampered appearance, is the disgrace of our order-out on't-If you are hungry, can't you be content with the wholesome roots of the earth; and if you are dry, isn't there he crystal spring? (Drinks.] Put this away, [Givesa

Glass.) and show me where I'm wanted. (PORTER draws the Glass.-Paul, going, turns.] So, you would have drank it, if there had been any left. Ah, glutton! glutton !

(Exeunta

SCENE VI.

The Court before the Priory.

Enter Isaac and ANTONIO.

Isaac. A plaguy while coming, this same Father
Paul-He's detained at vespers, I suppose, poor fel-
low.
Ant. No, here he comes.

Enter PAUL.
Good Father Paul, I crave your blessing.

Isaac. Yes, good Father Paul, we are come to beg a favour.

Paul. What is it, pray?

Isaac. To marry us, good Father Paul ; and in truth thou dost look the very priest of Hymen.

Paul. In short, I may be called 80; for I deal in repentance and mortification.

Isaac. No, no, thou seemest an officer of Hymen, because thy presence speaks content and good humour.

Paul. Alas! my appearence is deceitful. Bloated I am, indeed! for fasting is a windy recreation, and it hath swoln me like a bladder.

Ant. But thou hast a good fresh colour in thy face, father; rosy, i'faith.

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your face.

Paul. Yes, I have blushed for mankind, till the hue of my shame is as fixed as their vices.

Isaac. Good man!

Paul. And I have laboured too, but to what purpose ? they continue to sin under my very nose.

Isaac. Efecks, father, I should have guessed as much, for your nose seems to be put to the blush more than any other part of

Paul. Go, you're a wag.

Art. But, to the purpose, father-will you officiate for us?

Paul. To join young people thus clandestinely is not safe : and, indeed, I have in my heart many weighty reasons against it. Ant. And I have in

my

hand many weighty reasons for it. Isaac, hav'n't you an argument or two in our favour about you?

Isaac. Yes, yes; here is a most unanswerable purse.

Paul. For shame! you make me angry: you forget who I am, and when importunate people have forced their trash-ay, into this pocket, here-or into this why, then the sin was theirs. [They put Money into his Pockets.) Fie, now how you distress me! I would return it, but that I must touch it that way, and so wrong my

oath. Ant. Now then, come with us.

Isaac. Ay, now give us your title to joy and rapture.

Paul. Well, when your hour of repentance comes, don't blame me.

Ant. No bad caution to my friend Isaac. (Aside.) Well, well, father, do you do your part, and I'ìl abide

consequence. Isaac. Ay, and so will I. [They are going

Enter Louisa, running. Louisa. O, Antonio, Ferdinand is at the porch, and enquiring for us.

the

Isaac. Who? Don Ferdinand ! he's not enquiring for me, I hope.

Ant. Fear not, my love, I'll soon pacify him.

Isaac, Egad, you won't-Antonio, take my advice, and run away: this Ferdinand is the most unmerciful dog! and has the cursedest long sword !-and, upon my soul, he comes on purpose to cut your throat. Ant. Never fear, never fear.

Isaac. Well, you may stay if you will ; but I'll get some one to marry me; for, by St Iago, he shall never marry me again, while I am master of a pair of heels.

[Runs out.

Enter FERDINAND.
Ferd. So, sir, I have met with you at last.
Ant. Well, sir.

Ferd. Base, treacherous man! whence can a false, deceitful soul, like yours, borrow confidence to look so steadily on the man you've injured ?

Ant. Ferdinand, you are too warm :-'tis true you find me on the point of wedding one I love beyond my life; but no argument of mine prevailed on her to elope-I scorn deceit, as much as you-By Heaven I knew not she bad left her father's, till I saw her.

Ferd. What a mean excuse ! You have wronged your friend then, for one, whose wanton forwardness anticipated your treachery—of this, indeed, your Jew pander informed me; but let your conduct be consistent, and since you have dared to do a wrong,

follow me, and show you have a spirit to avow it.

Louisa . Antonio, I perceive his mistake leave him to me.

Paul. Friend, you are rude, to interrupt the union of two willing hearts.

Ferd. No, meddling priest, the hand he seeks is mine.

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