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WIX.

ing! It is, therefore, with great satisfaction that He has surpassed himself, and evinced a talent for we note the issue of this beautiful and valuable embodying sentiment beyond what seems indicated edition. We say valuable, because Professor by his previous productions. The whole book is, Boyd bas enriched it with copious notes, critical in fact, a perfect work of art, “beautiful exceedand illustrative, highly judicious and instructive. ingly.” The volume is elegantly bound and printed, and We may here announce, for the gratification of has illustrations by Burt. It will make not only a the author's multitudinous readers, that Mr. Scribbeautiful, but a valuable present for the holidays. ner has in press a new work from Mr. Mitchell,

entitled, we believe, “ Dream-Life.” We may

safely predict for it unbounded success. The Hand-Book of Literature and Fine Arts. By GEORGE RIPLEY and BAYARD TAYLOR ; and

Tallis' Library Edition of the Works of ShakThe Hand-Book of Biography. By Parke God

speare. Revised from the original editions, with New-York: Geo. P. Putnam.

Notes, &c. John Tallis & Co., 97 and 100 St. These two works form part of Mr. Putnam's

John street, London, and 40 John street, New“ Home Cyclopædia," intended for educational

York. purposes and the general reader. We know of no A Drawing-room Table Book of Theatrical Porbooks of reference in so accessible a shape, that traits, with Memoirs and Anecdotes. Same deserve to be so highly commended. They em- Publisher. the most convenient form for reference, and may

We have received two or three numbers of the be relied upon as generally accurate and fuli. above works. The Shakspeare will be a magniThere has been no greater want in literature than ficent edition, splendidly illustrated. The printing a cheap cyclopædia ; and Mr. Putnam deserves is remarkably clear and elegant. great praise and abundant success for supplying the want with so much conscientious care in making a work of permanent value and authority. A Catechism of Familiar Things; their History,

and the Events which led to their Discovery;

with a Short Explanation of some of the PrinThe Woodbine ; a Holiday Gift. Edited by

cipal Natural Phenomena.

For the use of CAROLINE May. With Illustrations. Phila

Schools and Families. By E. E. WILLEMENT. delphia : Lindsay and Blakiston. From Rohr

Carefully Revised by an American Teacher.

Newback & Co., Broadway, New-York.

Philadelphia : Lindsay & Blakiston.

York: Rohrbach & Co., Broadway. 1852. In a late “ Evening with some Female Poets," we took occasion to speak of Miss May's character

The title explains pretty fully the purport of

this useful book. as regards her original writings. Her contribu

Everything in art, science, tions in the book before us more truly, perhaps, geography, history, manufactures and mineralogy support the favorable opinion we then gave. Her is treated of and traced in a succinct manner, from paper on “ Handel” is every way acceptable. bazine to an earthquake, from Cayenne pepper to

a drop of dew to a granite block, a yard of bomAs an editor, Miss May shows exceeding taste and appreciation. Her selections from the writers a volcano, and from the Chinese tollow tree to across the water" are judicious, though we do not landscape painting. There are some omissions and like to encourage the appropriation of such. Our misstatements in the part of the work concerning sympathies would lead us have the book entirely arts and poetry, which should be corrected in an of home manufacture. Yet we cannot, nor will ensuing edition. Paul Veronese, one of the most her readers, we are sure, object to such morceaux

imaginative and inexhaustible of the Italian paintas she gives.

ers, famous for his grouping and breadth of light and shade, is not mentioned at all among the

painters of Italy. The omission of the names Reveries of a Bachelor; or, A Book of the Heart. of Palladio and Inigo Jones—the former the By IK MARVEL. Illustrated edition. New

founder of a new order, and the latter a most York: Charles Scribner.

successful professor—from the chapter in which

architecture is treated of, leave a blank unacWe understand that editions amounting to more counted for in the modern progress of that art. than ten thousand copies of this admirable book Barry is classed amongst the English painters, have been sold ; notwithstanding which, the enter- while every student of painting recollects his name prising publisher feels sufficient confidence in its as synonymous with Ireland. He was no more an worth and consequent continued success to warrant English painter than Fuseli (Swiss), Sir Peter him in issuing an edition for the boliday season, Lily (German), Sir Godfrey Kneller (German), most exquisitely illustrated, and superblý printed whose names, by the way, are not mentioned at and bound. The designs are by Darley, and cer- all, although the Germans were two of the most tainly the work could have been intrusted to no famous painters at the courts of Charles I. and II., one more competent. It was a delicate task he William III., and George I.,—than Rubens and had to perform, to embody the tender and beauti- Vandyke (Flemish), Benjamin West and J. S. ful fancies of his author, but he has done it with a Copley (Americans), all of whom lived a large grace and skill which leave nothing to be desired. portion of their lifetime in England, but who bave

their true birth-homes assigned them. Edward ! make no mention than introduce mediocrity; or, if Smith and Samuel Forde, whom the English have names must be given, then let us have those which respectively called the Phidias and Angelo of Ire- are regarded with esteem and admiration by the land; among the poets of Ireland, Scotland, and world for their real merits. England, Goldsmith, Burns, and Shelley, are not mentioned at all; and among those of our own country, the names of Bryant, Longfellow, Halleck, Hoffman, and Wallace are left out, while Meditations in America, and Other Poems. Ву the only ones recognisable or discerned among WILLIAM Ross WALLACE. New York: Charles the ten given are Edgar A. Poe and Ed. c. Scribner. Pinckney. To say that, because all those men who are mentioned wrote verses, and are dead This volume of genuine poems will be widely (with one exception), and so are poets, is doing welcomed by the numerous admirers whom they injustice to the genius of our land, and giving our have won in our own and other pages, where most children a wrong notion of imagination, sublimity, of them have appeared. It is an unpretending and taste, as regards literature. It is better to and beautiful voluine.

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The New-York Gallery of the Fine Arts, after , York attractions ; and no visitor to the city can be an interval of a few months, is again open in the said to have seen all its various institutions without rooms of the National Academy of Design. The enumerating among them the New-York Gallery general appearance of the exhibition is more pleas- of the Fine Arts. ing, as the pictures hang to better advantage in “The Course of Empire,” by Cole, is the main the long rooms than in the large one occupied by attraction of this exhibition. Other works by him, the Gallery last year, and more interest is apparent embracing a larger number than the public have in the addition of pictures by artists who have not access to in any other place, contribute largely to heretofore been represented in the Gallery. give the Gallery a character which belongs to it

The catalogue embraces the names of many dis- alone, and which, in the course of time, will render tinguished artists : Cole, Trumbull, Inman, Brown, it one of the most important institutions in the city. Clevenger, Leutze, Durand, Mount, Ingham, Ed. We allude to its being a receptacle for one or more monds, Kensett, Hicks, Cummings, Flagg, and other of the works of every American artist, so that, American artists, to which may be added the j after he shall have passed away, both students names of Morland and Raeburn. "To strangers, the and amateurs of succeeding generations may know Gallery must be an agreeable lounge for two or where to find a work of every artist, at all conthree leisure hours, and to "sight-seers” it fur- spicuous in our country's history of art. The value nishes a place of great interest. Most of the works of the Gallery in this respect is hardly appreciable exhibited are by artists of perbaps a greater local as yet, but that it is beginning to be so, is apparent than a foreign reputation; but being “to the in the desire of young students in art to study the manor born,” they are an integral part of New works of Cole.

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d. preaching of the general they enjoy thinking, deulles

, how the Departe

that He has surpassed himself, and evinced a talent for the pay, for in the distalad oll medieval ston-mohis

, we

uable embodying sentiment beyond what seems indiested

ofessor by his previous productions. The whole book is het is dead. So para follow in their whittlings, wall be me critical in fact, a perfect work of art, "beautiful exoved to give to them as it le founded to see, some day after a

ructive. ingly." means of comixtulbi, a full-riggedeburch, with more

ed, and We may here announce, for the gratification of

t only a the author's multitudinous readers, that Mr. Sorib considering water bir and chancel, battres, spin sal-beli

nolidays. Der has in press a new work from Mr. Mitchell, them, do not forget tuff. hauled out on the floating dick to Low bez

entitled, we believe, “Dream-Life." We may all men and was a new corner stone spiked into Leslie all

safely predict for it unbounded success speak fluendis, ar er lions recoppered, and her modern

Arts. By preaching media malked and pitchel But

Tallis' Library Edition of the Works of Shak and that our DOW,

ARKE GOD

speare. Revised from the original editions, with as a thousand boas apels, and chaplains and her like

Notes, &e. John Tallis & Co.

, 97 and 100 St. inland, this is al die plant proportion of real silin de

Ir. Putnam's

John street, London, and 40 John street, New

York. asked. Let the mes te ever bear a good word nie! educational

fe know of no A Drawing-room Table Book of Theatrical Porn representativa de and the factes del

a shape, that

traits, with Memoirs and Anecdotes. Same

red. They em- Publisher. shore, be the relea

con, arranged in The Beamul Pal amy churches, and they wants

erence, and may

We have received two or three numbers of the ccurate and fuit

. above works. The Shakspeare will be a magni

in literature than ficent edition, splendidly illustrated. The printing be the most interes

Putnam deserves is remarkably clear and elegant. well managed do

ccess for supplying

ientious care in makImerican Triet Say Sunday morning, ani bare

plaa
cue and authority

A Catechism of Familiar Things; their History,

and the Events which led to their Discovery;

with a Short Explanation of some of the Prinretfal of som; would spend the lense number of shop, and the night in the

day Gift. Edited by

cipal Natural Phenomena. For the use of h Illustrations. Phila

Schools and Families. By E. E. WILLEMENT. ten prodigaly zeta Mothelio

Blakiston. From Rohr

Carefully Revised by an American Teacher.
Philadelphia : Lindsay & Blakiston. New-

York: Rohrbach & Co., Broadway. 1852.
with some Female Poets,"

The title explains pretty fully the purport of nal writings. Her contribu

efore us more truly, perhaps, geography, history, manufactures and mineralogy Jour duty to the allow provided and

le opinion we then gave. Her is treated of and traced in a succinct manner, from el® Of every way acceptable

. a drop of dew to a granite block, a yard of bomMay shows exceeding taste and

ser selections from the writers st they be doing and wantin " are judicious, though we do not landscape painting. There are some omissions

and lied healul Pus have the book entirely ants and poetry, which should be corrected in an al boutmen, det lite mere

ufacture.
we are sure, object to such morceaux derni, intius fardinexhaustible of the Italian painet

kurioms, but very few stils mall various agenda de meted area theit gegylalay med is

food would they do tla na dla kere. I have known a crea to be

religious establishman

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ir commercial ca provided with des for the attend er of civie pride me chat great puts aspect. Diop de hey bou or

mashore, being an obtin, lhin

of a Bachelor; or, A Book of the Heart of Palladio and Inigo Jones—the former the

MARVEL. Illustrated edition. New founder of a new order, and the latter a most

Charles Scribner. =of what that like that

understand that editions amounting to more counted for in the modern progress of that art. en thousand copies of this admirable book Barry is classed amongst the English painters, been sold ; notwithstanding which, the enter. wbile every student of painting recollects his name th and consequent continued success to warrant English painter than Fuseli (Swiss), Sir Peter

ng publisher feels sufficient confidence in its as synonymous with Ireland. He was no more an ost exquisitely illustre and superbly printed whose names, by the way, are not mentioned at a in issuing an edition for the holiday season, Lily (German), Sir Godfrey Kneller (German),

Darley, and cernd hennd. The

all, although the Germans were two of the most

rusted to no famous painters at the courts of Charles I and II., air work

ate task he William III., and George I., -than Rubens and ne it with a Copley (Americans), all of whom lived

and beauti- Vandyke (Flemish), Benjamin West and J. S. 5 be desired. portion of their lifetime in England, but who h

described

a larg

head baril

their true birth-homes assigned them. Edward make no mention than introduce mediocrity; or, if Smith and Samuel Forde, whom the English have dames must be given, then let us have those which respectively called the Phidias and Angelo of Ire- are regarded with esteem and admiration by the land; among the poets of Ireland, Scotland, and world for their real merits. England, Goldsmith, Burns, and Shelley, are not mentioned at all; and among those of our own country, the names of Bryant, Longfellow, Halleck, Hoffman, and Wallace are left out, while Meditations in America, and Other Poems. By the only ones recognisable or discerned among WILLIAM Ross WALLACE. New-York: Charles the ten given are Edgar A. Poe and Ed. C. Scribner. Pinckney. To say that, because all those men who are mentioned wrote verses, and are dead This volume of genuine poems will be widely (with one exception), and so are poets, is doing welcomed by the numerous admirers whom they injustice to the genius of our land, and giving our have won in our own and other pages, where inost children a wrong notion of imagination, sublimity, of them have appeared. It an unpretending and taste, as regards literature. It is better to and beautiful volume.

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The New-York Gallery of the Fine Arts, after, York attractions ; and no visitor to the city can be an interval of a few months, is again open in the said to have seen all its various institutions without rooms of the National Acadeny of Design. The enumerating among them the New-York Gallery general appearance of the exhibition is more pleas- of the Fine Arts. ing, as the pictures hang to better advantage in “The Course of Empire,” by Cole, is the main the long rooms than in the large one occupied by attraction of this exhibition. Other works by him, the Gallery last year, and more interest is apparent embracing a larger number than the public bare in the addition of pictures by artists who have not access to in any other place, contribute largely to heretofore been represented in the Gallery. give the Gallery a character which belongs to it

The catalogue embraces the names of many dis- alone, and which, in the course of time, will render tinguished artists : Cole, Trumbull, Inman, Brown, it one of the most important institutions in the city. Clevenger, Leutze, Durand, Mount, Ingham, Ed- We allude to its being a receptacle for one or more monds, Kensett, Hicks, Cummings, Flagg, and other of the works of every American artist, so that, American artists, to which may be added the j after he shall have passed away, both students names of Morland and Raeburn. To strangers, the and amateurs of succeeding generations may ktor Gallery must be an agreeable lounge for two or where to find a work of every artist, at all conthree leisure hours, and to "sight-seers” it fur spicuous in our country's history of art. The value nishes a place of great interest. Most of the works of the Gallery in this respect is hardly appreciable exhibited are by artists of perbaps a greater local as yet, but that it is beginning to be so, is apparent than a foreign reputation ; but being “to the in the desire of young students in art to study the manur born,” they are an integral part of New- works of Cole.

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