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CHESHIRE CHEESE TAVERN xvi
CHESTER, WALLS OF .... 861
CHESTERFIELD, FIFTH
EARL OF

697 CHEYNE, DR. GEORGE 621 CHICHESTER

983 CLARKE, SAMUEL..

759 CLIVE, MRS. CATHERINE.. 891

HER RESIDENCE 893

Autograph
Letter

892 CLIVE, ROBERT LORD 821 Cook, CAPTAIN JAMES 609 COWDRAY HOUSE

985 COWLEY, ABRAHAM.

911 CRABBE, Rev. GEORGE ..

991 CRADOCK, JOSEPH

624 CROFT, REV. SIR HERBERT 1065 CROWN AND ANCHOR TAVERN..

625 CRUIKSHANK,

WILLIAM
CUMBERLAND

1027 CULLEN, DR. WILLIAM. 711 CUMBERLAND, RICHARD.. 627

(Miss R. E. Drummond) 1051 GEORGE III ....

701 GIBBON, EDWARD

1119 GOLDSMITH, OLIVER (Rey

nolds-Marchi), photogra-
vure, facing p.

654 GOLDSMITH, OLIVER, (Henry Bunbury)

651 HIS MONUMENT IN THE TEMPLE

653 HIS MONUMENT IN WESTMINSTER ABBEY 657 GORDON, LORD GEORGE . 881 GREEN, RICHARD

593 HIS MUSEUM . 594 GRAY, THOMAS

897 GREY, DR. ZACHARY 809

JOHNSON, SAMUEL (Northcote)...

(Miss Reynolds

(Sargent-Marcel AT THRALE'S SUMME House

AND BOSWELL, cari cature MONUMENT TO,

, LICHFIELD... JOHNSON'S MONUMENT I LICHFIELD CATHEDRAL

IN ST. PAUL's. GRAVE-STONE . JOHNSON, URN AT GWAG

NYNOG TO...... JOHNSON'S BIRTHPLACE. JOHNSON'S CHAIR . . JOHNSON, Facsimile Lette

· LIVES ENGLISH Poets," fac simile title pages.....84

BEAUTIES OF (fac simile)

DEFORMITIES OF (fac simile)

LIVES
ENGLISH POETS," (cor-

rected proof sheet)..., Johnson's Willow

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OF

THE

OF

THE

D'ARBLAY, FRANCES
BURNEY, MME,

1049 DODD, WILLIAM (Ridley). 679

DR. WILLIAM (John
Russell)

695 (Dr. Dodd). 713 DOUGLAS, DR. JOHN 1053 DYER, Rev. JOHN

587 SAMUEL

895

HACKMAN, REV. JAMES .. 847 HAMILTON, Rr. Hon.

WILLIAM GERARD 1033 HARRIS, JAMES

773 HASTINGS, WARREN

927 HAWKINS, SIR JOHN 1103 HEBERDEN, WILLIAM 1013 HECTOR, EDMUND

590 HIS House

589 HENRY, DR. ROBERT.. 819 HOOLE, JOHN

933 HORACE's VILLA

765 HORNE, DR. GEORGE 581 HUME, DAVID

677 HUMPHRY, Ozias.

1043 HURD, DR. RICHARD . 747

ANI

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IONA

715

FARMER, DR. RICHARD .. 901 FLATMAN, THOMAS

622 FLEET STREET

793 FLORENTINE BOAR

749 FORDYCE, REV. JAMES .. 1143 Fox, Hon. CHARLES JAMES 777 FRANKLIN, BENJAMIN

757

vure

AT

GARRICK, DAVID

(Luke Sullivan) 617

(Sir Joshua Reynolds). photogravure, facing p..

768 BETWEEN TRAGEDY AND COMEDY 771

—, BUST IN LICHFIELD CATHEDRAL

843 HIS RESIDENCE, ADELPHI TERRACE

950

JAMES, DR. ROBERT 605 JENKINSON, CHARLES, EARL OF LIVERPOOL

699 JENYNS, SOAME

789 JOHNSON, SAMUEL (John Opie, R.A.), photogra

...Frontispiece 1778 (Reynolds) 741

THRALE
PLACE

ST. CHADS
JOHNSON'S HOUSE, BOLT

COURT
JONES, SIR WILLIAM..

KEDDLESTONE.

CHURCH
KELLY, HUGH
KEMBLE, JOHN PHILIP
KIPPIS, DR.
KNOWLES, MRS. MARY

743
1773 (Ozias
Humphry)

745 1777 (Nollekens) 825 (James Barry). 913 1782 (Trotter) 975 1784 (J. Roberts) 1069 (Bоsland) 1035 (Lamborn) 1041 (Loggan)

1077

LANGTON, BENNET, photo

gravure facing p....... LICHFIELD, BISHOP's PALACE . CATHEDRAL

Johnson's
MONUMENT IN ....

FRIARY..
LICHFIELD, GREEN'S
MUSEUM..

JOHNSON'S MONU

MENT AT

JOHNSONS WILLOW AND Sr. CHADS

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PLACE .....

LICHFIELD, OLD GUILD OR
Town HALL..

601
Miss PORTER'S
HOUSE

598 ST. MARY'S CHURCH 1113 AND MARKET

1147 THREE CROWNS INN 591

PARLOUR OF.. 592 LOCKE, JOHN

833 LONDON, ADELPHI TERRACE

950 CHARING CROSS AND NORTHUMBERLAND House

683 CHESHIRE CHEESE TAVERN

xvi CROWN AND ANCHOR TAVERN

625 The Essex HEAD .. 1039

FLEET STREET IN THE
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 793

TEMPLE BAR FROM
BUTCHER Row

795 -,Dr. BURNEY's HOUSE 969

JOHNSON'S HOUSE,
BOLT COURT...... 867

GOLDSMITH'S MONU-
MENT IN THE TEMPLE.. 653

ST. PAUL'S CATHE-
DRAL

1135 JOHNSON'S MONUMENT AT

1137 ST. MILDRED'S AND THE POULTRY

645 REYNOLDS's HOUSE 811 THRALE'S BREWERY, SOUTHWARK

941 -, NEWGATE, THE BURNING OF....

883 LUTON HOE

966 LYTTELTOX, GEORGE LORD 921

MURPHY, ARTHUR

619 NewGATE, BURNING OF..

883 NICHOLS, JOHN

909 OGLETHORPE, GENERAL 639 ΟΜΑΙ

611 OPIE, JOHN

1142 ORRERY AND CORK, EARL OF

753 OXFORD (Dayes)

689 FROM MAGDALEN BRIDGE ..

1057 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 577 PAOLI, GENERAL ......

623 PARR, DR. SAMUEL.

899 PELICAN INN, BATH

629 PENNANT, THOMAS

779 PERCY, THOMAS ..781, 865 Piozzi, GABRIEL

1089 Piozzi, MRS. See THRALE. PORTEOUS, DR. BEILBY.. 783 PORTER, Mrs. LUCY 1123

HER House.. 598 POULTRY AND ST. MILDRED'S CHURCH

645 PRIESTLEY, DR. JOSEPH.. 1021 PRIOR, MATTHEW...

733 PSALMANAZAR, GEORGE .. 803

PAGE STERNE, LAURENCE

952 StoWHILL

599 STRATFORD-UPON-AVON 586 SWIFT, JONATHAN

919 TEMPLE BAR.

795 TEMPLE, SIR WILLIAM 775 THOMSON, JAMES.

671 THRALE, MRS., AT THRALE PLACE

743 THRALE, HENRY

943 AT THRALE PLACE

743 THRALE, Mrs. (J. Jackson) 607 (Reynolds) ....

937 (Mrs. Piozzi) . 1085

1117 THRALE'S BREWERY

941 THRALE PLACE

981 SUMMERHouse

971 DRAWINGROOM

743 THURLOW, LORD

1093 Tooke, Rev. John HORNE 807 TYERS, THOMAS

805

RAMSAY, ALLAN

817 RAY, MARTHA ..

849 REYNOLDS, Miss FRANCES 813

Sir JOSHUA, photogravure facing p..

997 889 1139

1079 His House. 811 ROCHESTER, EARL of .... 731 ROUND ROBIN, THE

655 RUDD, MARGARET CAROLINE

815

727 613 995 915

VACAULAY, MRS.

CATHERINE MACLAURIN, COLIN MANSFIELD, EARL OF. MILTON, JOHN MODERN MIDNIGHT CON

VERSATION. MONBODDO, LORD MONCKTON, Hox. Miss

(LADY CORK) MOXTAGUE, MRS. ELIZA

829 1047

953

UTTOXETER, MARKET

PLACE

1108

VAUXHALL GARDENS

797 VESTRIS, SIGNOR

939 WALKER, JOHN

1009 WALPOLE, HORACE

1075 WARBURTON, WILLIAM 917 WARREN, DR. RICHARD.. 1130 WATSON, DR. RICHARD

(BISHOP OF LLANDAFF). 959 Watts, ISAAC

834 WELCH, SAUNDERS

742 WESLEY, Rev. JOHN 855 WESTMINSTER ABBEY.... 1131

GOLDSMITH'S
MONUMENT

657
JOHNSON'S
GRAVE-STONE

1133 WHITE, Rev. HENRY.... 1109 WHITEFIELD, Rev. GEORGE 859 WHITEFOORD, CALEB 1081 WILKES, JOHN (R. E. Pine) 643

(Hogarth) 725

(J. Chapman). 951
WILLIAMS, HELEN MARIA 1055
WILLIAMS, ANNA.... 1152
WINDHAM, Rr. Hon.
WILLIAM

999 YO DR. EDWARD.... 961

HIS RESIDENCE 963

>

.

BETH
JIORE, HANNAH

St. Cross HOSPITAL ......687
ST. MILDRED'S CHURCH.. 645
St. Paul's CATHEDRAL .. 1135

1137
SEWARD, ANNA .

597 CANON THOMAS. 595 WILLIAM..

681
SHEBBEARE, JOHN

955
SHERIDAN, RICHARD
BRINSLEY

675
SHIPLEY, DR. JONATHAN 769
SIDDONS, MRS. SARAH.. 1029
SOUTHILL CHURCH

965
SPENCE, JOSEPH

923
STEELE, SIR RICHARD 583

877
791
945

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From a drawing by F. Clementson

THE CHESHIRE CHEESE TAVERN

Wine Office Court, Fleet Street Although this tavern is not mentioned by Boswell in his "Life of Johnson," it is, traditionally, believed to have been one of the sage's haunts. Cyrus Redding, in his “Fifty Years' Recollections, Literary and Personal," 1858, says, “I often dined at the Cheshire Cheese. Johnson and his friends, I was informed, used to do the same, and I was told I should see individuals who had met them there. Johnson had been dead above twenty years, but there were Fleet Street tradesmen who well remembered both Johnson and Goldsmith in those places of entertainment."

CHAPTER XXXI-1776

A TOUR IN THE MIDLANDS

Johnson Starts on his Journey to the Midlands with Boswell—Mr. Gwyn, the Architect-Johnson and

Boswell at Oxford-University College-Dr. Wetherell—Pembroke College-Dr. Adams-Phil Jones and Fludyer-Dr. Bentham-Dr. Horne-Walton's Lives"-Thomas Warton—Robert and James Dodsley—Dr. John Campbell—Steele—“Tristram Shandy"-Edmund Burke-At Blenheim-Inns and Taverns-Shenstone-Dyer's Fleece ”—Grainger's “Sugar Cane”—Dr. Percy–At Birmingham-Mr. Hector and Mr. Lloyd-Quakers—Mrs. Careless— Lichfield—Three Crowns Inn—Lucy Porter-Peter Garrick—Harry Jackson-Oat-ale—Garrick-Richard Green

Rev. Thos. Seward-Miss Seward—Death of Mr. Thrale's Son-Mrs. Aston—Marriage. On Tuesday, March 19, which was fixed for our proposed jaunt, we met in the morning at the Somerset coffee-house in the Strand, where we were taken up by the Oxford Coach. He was accompanied by Mr. Gwyn, the architect; and a gentleman of Merton college, whom we did not know, had the fourth seat. We soon got into conversation ; for it was very remarkable of Johnson that the presence of a stranger had no restraint upon his talk. I observed that Garrick, who was about to quit the stage, would soon have an easier life. JOHNSON: “I doubt that, Sir." BOSWELL : “Why, Sir, he will be Atlas with the burden off his back.” JOHNSON : “But I know not, Sir, if he will be so steady without his load. However, he should never play any more, but be entirely the gentleman, and not partly the player: he should no longer subject himself to be hissed by a mob, or to be insolently treated by performers, whom he used to rule with a high hand, and who would gladly retaliate." BOSWELL: “I From an engraving by J. Greig think he should

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, OXFORD play once a year

Johnson and Boswell were entertained at University College on their visit to for the benefit of

Oxford in 1776.

371–3279)

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decayed actors, as it has been said he means to do.” JOHNSON : “Alas, Sir! he will soon be a decayed actor himself.”

Johnson expressed his disapprobation of ornamental architecture, such as magnificent columns supporting a portico, or expensive pilasters supporting merely their own capitals, “ because it consumes labour disproportionate to its utility. For the same reason he satirised statuary. Painting (said he) consumes labour not disproportionate to its effect; but a fellow will hack half a year at a block of marble, to make something in stone that hardly resembles a man. The value of statuary is owing to its difficulty. You would not value the finest head cut upon a carrot.” Here he seemed to me to be strangely deficient in taste; for, surely, statuary is a noble art of imitation, and preserves a wonderful expression of the varieties of the human frame; and although it must be allowed that the circumstances of difficulty enhance the value of a marble head, we should consider that, if it requires a long time in the performance, it has a proportionate value in durability.

Gwyn was a fine, lively, rattling fellow. Dr. Johnson kept him in subjection, but with a kindly authority. The spirit of the artist, however, rose against what he thought a Gothic attack, and he made a brisk defence. “What, Sir! will you allow no value to beauty in architecture or in statuary? Why should we allow it then in writing ? Why do you take the trouble to give us so many fine allusions, and bright images, and elegant phrases? You might convey all your instruction without these ornaments.” Johnson smiled with complacency; but said, “Why, , Sir, all these ornaments are useful, because they obtain an easier reception for truth ; but a building is not at all more convenient for being decorated with superfluous carved work."

Gwyn at last was lucky enough to make one reply to Dr. Johnson which he allowed to be excellent. Johnson censured him for taking down a church which might have stood many years, and building a new one at a different place, for no other reason but that there might be a direct road to a new bridge ; and his expression was, “ You are taking a church out of the way, that the people may go in a straight line to the bridge.”—“No, Sir (said Gwyn), I am putting the church in the way that the people may not go out of the way.” JOHNSON (with a hearty loud laugh of approbation) : “Speak no more. Rest your colloquial fame upon this."

Upon our arrival at Oxford, Dr. Johnson and I went directly to University College, but were disappointed on finding that one of the fellows, his friend Mr. Scott, who accompanied him from Newcastle to Edinburgh, was gone to the country. We put up at the Angel Inn, and passed the evening by ourselves in easy and familiar conversation. Talking of constitutional melancholy, he observed, “A man so afflicted, Sir, must divert distressing thoughts, and not combat with them.” BOSWELL : May not he think them down, Sir ? " JOHNSON : “No, Sir. To attempt to think them down is madness. He should have a lamp constantly burning in his bed-chamber during the night, and if wakefully disturbed, take a book and read, and compose himself to rest. To have the management of the mind is a great art, and it may be attained in a considerable degree by experience and habitual exercise.” BOSWELL : “Should not he provide amusements for himself ? Would it not, for instance, be right for him to take a course of chemistry?” Johnson : “Let him take a course of chemistry or a course of rope-dancing, or a course of anything to which he is inclined at the time. Let him contrive to have as many retreats for his mind as he can, as many things to which it can fly from itself. Burton's “ Anatomy of Melancholy' is a valuable work. It is, perhaps, overloaded

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