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III.

SUSPENSIVE QUANTITY. CUSPENSIVE QUANTITY means prolonging the end D of a word, without an actual pause; and thus suspending, without wholly interrupting, the progress of sound.

The prolongation on the last syllable of a word, or sus- pensive quantity, is indicated thus , in the following examples. It is used chiefly for three purposes : 1st. To prevent too frequent a recurrence of pauses; as,

Her lover sinks—she sheds no ill-timed tear;

Her chief is slain--she fills his fatal post;
Her fellows flee—she checks their base career;

The foe retires—she heads the rallying host. 2d. To produce a slighter disjunction than would be made by a pause; and thus at once to separate and unite; as,

Would you kill your friend and benefactor ? Would you practice hypocrisy and smile in his face, while your conspiracy is ripening?

3d. To break up the current of sound into small portions, which can be easily managed by the speaker, without the abruptness which would result from pausing wherever this relief was needed ; and to give ease in speaking; as,

Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze,
Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees;
Lives through all life, extends through all extent,

Spreads undivided, operates unspent. GENERAL RULE.— When a preposition is followed by as many as three or four words which depend upon it, the word preceding the preposition will either have suspensive quantity, or else a pause; as,

He is the pride of the whole country.

Require students to tell which of the preceding rules or principles is illustrated, wherever a mark, representing the pause or suspensive quantity, is introduced in the following

EXERCISES IN PAUSES. 1. It matters very little what immediate spot may have been the birth-place of such a man as Washington. No peo

EXERCISE IN DAUSES.

55

which of our pozis the defent creation.

ple y can claim y no country can appropriate him. The boon of Providence to the human race his fame is eternity on and his dwelling-place-creation.

2. Though it was the defeat y of our arms and the disgrace of our policy 44 I almost bless the convulsion y in which he had his origin. If the heavens thundered, and the earth rocked my yet when the storm passed how pure was the climate that it cleared 74 how bright in the brow of the firmament was the planet which it revealed to us!

3. In the production of Washington it does really appear as if nature , was endeavoring to improve upon herself 44 and that all the virtues of the ancient world, were but so many studies preparatory to the pātriot of the new. Individual instances no doubt there were splendid exemplifications y of some single qualification. Cæsar was merciful 7 Scipio was continent Hannibal y was patient. But y it was reserved for Washington y to blend them all in one my and like the lovely masterpiece of the Grecian artist to exhibit - in one glow of associated beauty, the pride of every modèl - and the perfection of every master.

4. As a general y he marshaled the peasant into a veteran go and supplied by discipline the absence of experience. As a statesman yn he enlarged the policy of the cabinet into the most comprehensive system of general advantage. And such was the wisdom of his views y and the philosophy of his counsels that to the soldier and the statesman, he almost added the character of the sage.

5. A conqueror, he was untainted with the crime of blood yn a revolutionist he was free from any stain of treason for aggression commenced the contesty and his country called him to the field. Liberty unsheathed his sword y necessity stained go victory y returned it.

6. If he had paused here - history might have doubted, whati station to assign him yu whether at the head of her citizens or her soldiers y her heroes or her pătriots. But the last glorious act, crowns his career and banishes all hesitation. Who - like Washington after having emancipated a hemisphere - resigned its crown vw and preferred the retirement of domestic life to the adoration of a land he might almost be said to have created ?

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OBSERVATIONS TO TEACHERS.

TN order to form good readers, it will be necessary for I students, after they have thoroughly mastered PART FIRST, to review frequently the more important elements of elocution, reading again and again, both separately and in concert, the exercises for illustration.

In PART SECOND, they should be required to study carefully each reading lesson, acquiring a knowledge of the pronunciation and definitions of doubtful words and of the important facts embraced in the notes, before attempting to read in the class. In order to secure a natural and easy style of delivery, let them often commence with the last word in a paragraph and pronounce back to the first, before reading from left to right. Their judgment and taste should constantly be called into exercise by requiring them to determine what principle, or principles, of elocution each reading lesson is best adapted to illustrate.

Reading aloud and recitation, when properly conducted, become very useful and invigorating muscular exercises. The instructor will require the students to stand or sit uprightly and easily; to inhale fully at the beginning, and as often as is necessary, at the natural pauses of discourse, in order to keep an abundant supply of air in the lungs; and, in forming and undulating the voice, to use freely the draphragm and abdominal muscles, as well as the muscles of the chest.

KEY TO THE USE OF MARKED LETTERS.

åge or āge, åt or åt, årt, áll, båre, åsk; wè or wē, end or ěnd, her; ice or īce, in or în; old or õld, ổn or on, dở; múte or māte, ůp or ủp, füll; this; azure; reäl, (not rēl); o'vershoot'; badness, (not nīss); agèd, (not ājd).

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