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Philadelphia, 1844. A "Pictorial History of the United States," with Notices of other parts of America." By S. G. Goodrich, author of Peter Parley's Tales. For the use of Schools. This is, perhaps, the best book of its kind which has issued from the press, for the purpose intended. The history is necessarily greatly condensed, but the incidents are clearly stated, and in a perspicuous style. There are a great many cuts, illustrative of historical facts, or descriptive of places rendered memorable by important events. But the celebrity of Peter Parley renders our commendation superfluous. This is the first edition of the work. A Pictorial History of France, by the same author, has been also recently published by Sorin and Ball, for the use of Schools.-Zion's Herald and Wesleyan Journal.

Belle-Vue Seminary, August, 17th, 1844.

I have carefully examined the "Pictorial History of the United States," edited by S. G. Goodrich, and do not hesitate to say, that I regard it as superior to any similar work that I am acquainted with, and as much better adapted to public or private instruction. I design to introduce it as a text book in this Seminary.

WILLIAM H. GILDER.

Butler House, Chesnut Street, September, 24th, 1844.

MESSRS. SORIN & BALL. GENT.-I know of no works of their kind more worthy of commendation than Goodrich's Histories. In style, arrangement, and general fitness for its purpose, I think the "Pictorial History of the United States," the best book on the subject used in the schools.

Yours Respectfully,
RUFUS W. GRISWOLD.

Philadelphia, July, 22nd, 1844.

I have examined with much interest "The Pictorial History of the United States, with notices of other portions of America, by S. G. Goodrich." The author of this work has, in my opinion, admirably succeeded in producing such a work as he aimed at a full, accurate and attractive history of the Western continent. Though intended particularly for youth, it may be read with profit and pleasure by all, and cannot fail to inspire all with sentiments of patriotism and a love of virtue.

The work is illustrated by maps, plans of battles, portraits, and engravings of scenes and incidents, equally creditable to the artist and profitable to the student.

The style and arrangement are such as to render the facts and sentiments most easy to be committed to memory.

JOSEPH P. ENGLES. Principal of the Classical Institute.

RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE "PICTORIAL HISTORY

OF FRANCE."

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Philadelphia, April, 1st, 1844. The reputation of the industrious and successful author of the Pictorial History of France," is so well established, that it needs no other commendation to the public, than his popular name. In preparing books of this eclectic character, the principal labor consists in the selecting of matter, and demands the exercise of a sound judgment, directed by a correct, discriminating taste, as the materials from which such histories are compiled, are exceedingly copious. From an examination of the plan, arrangement of parts &c., of this work, I think that it has been executed with great discretion. It is entertaining and instructive, as well as attractive to the eye, and is well adapted to the object for which it was prepared.

I cannot doubt that the attentive reading of such a syllabus as is here furnished, must excite an appetite, and prepare the mind for entering upon a larger and more extended history of the European Nations.

I know of nothing of the kind, better suited to the use of Schools, for which it is "particularly designed," and can cordially recommend it to the favorable regard of their supervisors and teachers.

S. JONES.

Principal of Classical and Mathematical Institute,
No. 17, South Seventh Street.

Philadelphia, December, 3rd, 1842.

MESSRS. SORIN & BALL.

GENT,-Having examined with care, the "Pictorial History of France," which you submitted to my inspection, I am prepared to commend it to the favorable notice to the public.

The want of a good history of France, suitable for a Class book, has been long felt, and this work seems to fill the vacuum.

I cannot better express my estimation thereof than by informing you that we have adopted it.

Yours, very Respectfully,
GILBERT COMBS.

Principal of the Spring Garden Institute, for Young Ladies.

MESSRS. SORIN & BALL.

Philadelphia, March, 30th, 1844.

GENT,-It affords me pleasure to recommend the "Pictorial History of France," lately published by you, to the favorable attention of teachers and parents, as a work, eminently calculated, by the simplicity of its style, the variety and interest of its facts, and the beauty and appropriateness of its pictorial illustrations, to afford at once pleasure and profit, not only to youth, for whom it is specially designed, but to readers of every class.

I am pleased to learn that you contemplate the publication of a History of England, of the same attractive character.

Such works are a valuable acquisition to the cause of public and private education, and cannot fail to be duly appreciated by those for whose benefit they are intended.

JOSEPH P. ENGLES. Principal of the Classical Institute.

MESSRS. SORIN & BALL.

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Philadelphia, 1844.

GENT. A "Pictorial History of France," for Schools, by S. G. Goodrich, author of Peter Parley's Tales. This volume seems well fitted to convey to young readers a brief sketch of French History-being well arranged, the prominent points clearly set forth and each chapter furnished with questions adapted to direct the attention to the principal events and to fix them in the memory. The book seems calculated to be of essential service in the early study of history. The Publishers propose to publish similar histories of the United States, of England, Rome, and Greece.

From the New York TRIBUNE.

Philadelphia, November, 10th, 1842. GENT. I have examined with much satisfaction the "Pictorial History of France," by S. G. Goodrich, on the basis of Markham's History of France, and consider it well adapted to use in our Schools.

MESSRS SORIN & BALL.

Yours Respectfully,

A. D. BACHE.

GENT. I have given a partial examination to the "Pictorial History of France," lately published by you; and from what I have seen of the work, I should think it sustains the reputation which its well known author has acquired as an interesting writer for the young. A comprehensive knowledge of the history of France is next in importance to a similar knowledge of our own history and that of England. And I think the author of this work has taken a judicious medium between the voluminous detail and the scanty abridgement.

Yours, &c., R. W. GREEN.

Philadelphia, May, 10th, 1843.

MESSRS. SORIN & BALL.

GENT. I have looked over partially the "History of France," by S. G. Goodrich, which you were kind enough to send me. From the slight examination I have been able to give it, it appears to me to possess most of the qualities which have rendered the author's other works so popular, and to be well adapted to the purposes of juvenile instruction.

MESSRS. SORIN & BALL.

Respectfully Yours,
E. C. WINES.

Philadelphia, September, 19th, 1844.

GENT. The "Pictorial History of France," recently published by you; appears to me to be an excellent work, and well calculated for general use. The simplicity and clearness of its style, the variety of its incidents, and the number of its illustrations will tend to make it both interesting and useful, Your obedient Servant,

MESSRS. SORIN & BALL.

A. B. HUTTON. Deaf and Dumb Institution.

Philadelphia, September, 1842.

GENT. Having examined your edition of S. G. Goodrich's "Pictorial History of France," I am gratified at being able to speak of it in terms of warm commendation. Written with all the clearness, method, and tact of Goodrich, the work is curiously illustrated by pictorial representations of

of almost every great man or important event of French story. The number, variety, and appositeness of these illustrations, add greatly to the usefulness of the book, which while it does not neglect any other mode of impression, abounds in appeals to the great avenue to the memory, the eye. Wishing you much success in your useful enterprise.

I am, very Respectfully, Yours,

J. K. MITCHELL.

From the Philadelphia, Saturday Courier, of September, 17th, 1842. Is there a reader in the United States who has not read some of the productions of Peter Parley? If there is, he should immediately buy and read them all. Few men of any age have done so much real good towards facilitating the easy acquirement of useful knowledge, as our much esteemed friend, Mr. S. G. Goodrich. He has now brought out an embellished History of France, and we will tell our young friends that they will find it a condensed and valuable one. The history of France is a very absorbing one. For years we have been deeply interested in it and we are much pleased that a natural, eloquent and pure writer, like the renowned author of Peter Parley, has taken it upon himself to present to the Youth of our land a "Pictorial History," of a country with which all Americans should be well acquainted. It is a single 12mo. volume, of 347 pages.

From the Philadelphia, Saturday Evening Post, September 17th, 1842. The "Pictorial history of France," by S. G. Goodrich, author of "Peter Parley's Tales," one volume 12mo. Philadelphia, Messrs. Sorin and Ball.— The great and well deserved popularity of all Mr. Goodrich's former works, will secure for this history of France a favorable reception. It is designed principally for schools, and is written in the author's peculiarly simple and perspicuous style. The very large number of wood engravings with which it is embellished are admirably executed, and will add much to its interest and value, especially to the juvenile reader. We commend it heartily, as well to the general reader, as to parents and teachers.

From the Pennsylvania Inquirer and National Gazette, September, 10th,1842.

The "Pictorial History of France." An excellent volume with this title has just been published by Messrs. Sorin and Ball, of this city. It is from the pen of S. G. Goodrich, the author of "Peter Parley's Tales," and seems to us from the hasty examination we have been able to give it, one of the very best works for Schools that has been issued for a long time. While the facts are strictly historical, they are connected together in a manner at once captivating, agreeable, and especially suited for the youthful mind.

AN

IMPROVED GRAMMAR

OF THE

ENGLISH LANGUAGE,

ON THE

INDUCTIVE SYSTEM;

WITH

WHICH ELEMENTARY AND PROGRESSIVE LESSONS IN COMPOSITION ARE COMBINED.

- FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS AND ACADEMIES,

AND PRIVATE LEARNERS.

BY REV. BRADFORD FRAZEE,

LATE PRINCIPAL OF ELIZABETH FEMALE ACADEMY, WASHINGTON, (MISS.)

AND

STEREOTYPE EDITION.

PHILADELPHIA:

SORIN AND BALL,

NO, 42 NORTH FOURTH STREET.

BOSTON:

B. B. MUSSEY,

FOR SALE BY THE PRINCIPAL BOOKSELLERS IN THE U. STATES.

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