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him no more; and those who have erroneously imbibed prejudices against him, being misled by false reports, will learn to know the worth, appreciate the character, and venerate the memory of the late Duke of Kent.

66

houses, where the soldiers could get drunk on black strap for about half a real, though to the great injury of his own revenue; and also by introducing an admirable discipline, which made our soldiers the first in the world. Having served under him at Gib- And although some gentlemen, who raltar, I feel no hesitation in thus pub-preferred their ease, and a game of licly declaring, that I had an opportunity of appreciating his military character. He was to the army, what a pious and good bishop ought to be to the church; he not only did his duty himself, but saw that every one under his command did his also. What a state was the garrison in when he came into it! It was filthy as a pigstycontagion was without, and contagion was within. He had to cleanse the Augean stable; and he did so by shutting up the abominable wine

billiards, to a field-day, did not approve of this, yet I do not remember hearing any officer in the regiment in which I served, and which was under the command of his Royal Highness during the whole of the disturbance, speak disrespectfully of him, and long before he was recalled from the garrison, the most complete order was restored; and deeply by many was his departure regretted."

(To be concluded in our next.)

COMMERCIAL REPORT, 21st FEBRUARY, 1820.

THE last month has not been distinguished by any particular occurrence in trade; the rigour of the season has in a great degree prevented the usual lively intercourse with the interior: consequently sales of our bulkier imports have been much impeded by this circumstance; we do not however see any reason to alter our opinion, as to the prospect of a material revival in our commercial affairs during the present year; and by a reference to our Price Current, it will be obvious, that the prices of every article are so moderate, as to be susceptible of much improvement, whenever any favourable change takes place.

British Plantation Sugars still droop, and a slight depression may be noticed in the brown and low middling descriptions. The bright and fine qualities nearly maintain former prices.

Coffee has not proceeded in value in the manner anticipated by the speculators; but this product being of slow growth, and expensive in its culture, prices will probably not vary much during the year.-Rums are in steady demand; and Foreign Spirits have generally a tendency

to advance.

Cottons have last week been in good demand; this was most observable in American descriptions; the prices are steady.

Dry-Saltery Articles are chiefly without variation.-Logwood has rather improved ; also Valonia; which articles may be expected rather to advance, as they are the chief ingredients in dying black. Several sales of Sicily Shumac have been made at 21s. per cwt. Brimstone is without inquiry. Saltpetre is rather lower; 30s. per cwt. has been accepted for 500 bags of fair quality. In other Articles, nothing has occurred deserving remark.

The prices of Fish Oils are without variation, but there is scarcely any thing doing in them. In Tallow, however, a considerable improvement has taken place, and prices are looking up. The Timber market remains still in a dull state, but the stoppage of the canals, and the season of the year being unfit for building, has doubtless contributed much to this depression: a cargo of St. John's Pine has been sold, within these few days, at 18d. per cubic foot: a price which will not much more than clear the freight and charges, leaving the first cost a sacrifice. It seems to be in contemplation of the Legislature, to impose some duties on British American Imports: a measure of this kind seems to be called for, by our relations with the northern powers, although it is likely to be very strenuously opposed by the Colonists.

The Grain Market has exhibited some little degree of life; and Oats have advanced 1d. per bushel, and Irish Wheats about 3d. per bushel, on the last market day.

A considerable and lucrative trade has been carried on for some time past from this town, with Chili and the coasts of Peru ;-the first direct import from thence arrived here on the 19th instant, in the Thomas, J. Murphy, from Valparaiso.-The cargo consists of 2,446 serons Tallow.-67 ditto Peruvian Bark.-12 ditto Saffron.-152 ditto Clover and Bird Seed.-11 ditto Wheat.-66 ditto Vigonia Wool.-100 bundles Hemp.-932 bars Tin.—3 Trunks Chinchill Skins.-675 Hides.-82 Boxes-328,000 Dollars.

The trade to the shores of the Great Pacific seems likely to attract the attention of our merchants; and the extensive commerce now carried on to the coasts of the Amazon and La Plata, offer great marts for the manufactures of Britain, and it is hoped will reward the enterprise and industry of the merchant.

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Jamaica.... 6 10
Honduras,.. 7 0

Nicaragua Wood,
large solid..)
small

TOBACCO, b.

James River

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..26

14 0 16 0 s. d. s. d. 0 31 a 0 8 05 0 31

stemmed........ 0 412

1st, Pot, fresh, U. S. 41 0 a 42

Montreal ........38 0 American, 1st, Pearl 410

07 0 6 0 6 0 31 0 6 s. d. s. d.

0

39 0

43 0

TAR, barrl.Stockholm 20 0

22 0

Archangel 20

0

22 0

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St. Petersburg 12-head 55 0 a HOPS, Kent pock. new 3 15 & Sussex, bags, do. 3 10 Worcester, do. 3 15 4 15 Yearling, Kent or 3 0 4 0 Worcester, in ps. 3 10 4 4 PINE TIMBER, cub ft. s. d. s. d. American ........ 1 5 a 1 6 Baltic 2 6 3 0 SALT PETRE, cwt. 30 0 35 0 GRAIN, 8. d. s. d.

Barley, Engl60b. 4 9 a 5 3
Irish & Foreign 3 9
Beans, Engl. qr...42 0

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Blanketing

112 pairs, 21520

Hats, 2147 doz.-Hose, 13924 doz. pairs. Hardware, 6124.-Nails, 1251 cwts. Copper, 1751.-Glass, 2152 cwt. 200 cts. Bar and Bolt Iron, &c....... 1015 tone. Steel, 324 cwts.-Tinplates, 1926 boxes. Lead, 240; Lead Ore 4 tons. Earthenware ....... ...3249 crates, &c. Refined Sugar...

... 1479 cwts. White Salt to Foreign Parts, 10005 tons. Ireland........ 80 Rock Salt to Foreign Parts.. 996 Ireland ...... 3895 Coal to Forein Parts

Ireland

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668 chal. 1938

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Liverpool Imports, from the 21st Jan. to the 21st February.

Sugar, B. P. 1660 hhds. 3 brls. 37 tces. Brazils, 91 cases, 10 chests. E. India, 3151 bags, 52 casks, 278 boxes.-Coffee, B. P. 59 casks, 40 brls. 10 tces. 356 bgs. Foreign, 40 casks, 107 brls. 526 bags. East India, 188 bales.-Cotton, West India, 707 bales, 30 bags, 5 pockets, 123 serons. American, 30316 bales, 2283 bgs. Brazils, 785 bales, 16492 bgs. 3222 serons. East India, 2860 bales.Rum, 314 punchs. 21 hhds.-Brandy, 351 punchs. 30 pipes.-Lemon juice, 20 casks.-Wine, 29 hhds. 135 pipes, I butt, 10 casks.-Nicaragua Wood, 25 tons.-Fustic, 834 tons.-Logwood, 135 tons.-Lignumvitæ,15 tons.-Ashes, 867 brls.-Tar, 500 brls.-Turpentine, 4134 barrels.-Rice, 124 tces. 118 brls. 1644 bgs.-Tobacco, 533 hhds. 705 bales. -Quercitron Bark, 198 hhds. 163 brls. 52 tees.-Ginger, 9690 bags, 14 bris.Saltpetre, 1283 bags, 98 cases.-Pepper, 1943 bags.-Hemp, 151 bales.-Indigo, 191 chests, 21 cases, 94 serons.-Mahogany, 157 logs.-Brimstone, 343 tons.Hides, 45802, and 2440 bdles.--Wool, 155 bales, 69 bags.-Sumac, 3215 bgs.Corkwood, 64 tons, 291 bales.-Oranges and Lemons, 2200 chests. 2409 boxes.Raisins, 2013 bxs, 401 drums, 347 csks. Corn, Wheat, 24825.-Oats, 29547.Barley, 5992 qrs. and 84 tons.-Beans, 1226 qrs.-Malt, 1915 qrs.-Flour, 457 tons, 11291 brls.-Oatmeal, 80 sacks, 1205 botts,114 tons.-Timber, 23 cargoes. Ireland.

Butter, 16546 frks. 151 kegs, &c.Rapeseed, 822 sacks. 374 qrs.-Flax, 972 bales & bgs.-Linen Cloth, 674 bxs. 570 bales and packages -Lard, 520 frks. &c.-Bacon, 578 bales, 38 hhds.-Hams, 138 hhds. 8 tces.-Pork, 3638 barrels.Beef, 870 tces. 224 brls.-Pigs, 2749.Cows, 327.-Sheep, 105.-Horses, 3.~~ Whiskey, 84 puncheons.

IRISH FUNDS.-February 19.

Government Debentures,34 cent, 79

Government Stock, 34

5

AMERICAN FUNDS-Feb. 19.

3 Cents

New 6 Cents

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FrankDitto at sight, 11: 16. Antwerp, Bourdeaux, 25: 35. Ports closed against all kinds of Grain for home consumption. Course of Exchange, in London, February 15. 12:1. Ex. M. Hamburg, 36: 1:2 U. Altona, 36: 2:20. fort on the Main, 1514. Ex. M. Madrid, 344. effect. Cadiz, 34 effect. Barcelona, 34. Gibraltar, 30. Leghorn, 474. Genoa, 441. Venice, Italian Liv. 27. 30. Malta, 46. Naples, 384. Palermo, 116. Lisbon, 52. Oporto, 514. Rio Janeiro, 56. Dublin, 94. Amsterdam, 11: 19 C. F. Paris, 3 days' sight, 25 5.

PRINTED BY H. FISHER, LIVERPOOL, PRINTER IN ORDINARY TO HIS MAJESTY:

Emperial Magazine;

OR, COMPENDIUM OF

RELIGIOUS, MORAL, & PHILOSOPHICAL KNOWLEDGE.

APRIL.]

"LITERARY PURSUITS AWAKEN AND IMPROVE OUR MENTAL ENERGIES."

REMARKS ON THE QUARTERLY

REVIEW.

66

[1820.

considerably shaken by a passage towards its conclusion. The passage relates to the prospective conversion IN number 43 of the Quarterly Review, of the Caffres. These people," says published in November last, there is a the Reviewer, "being entirely free from long article on the Colonization of the idolatrous prejudices, would be ready Cape of Good Hope. It professes to to embrace the benevolent doctrines of be a Review of eight publications on Christianity, and this field will perthat subject; though, by the way, it is haps be occupied by the Moravians, a misnomer to call it a review of either though we much fear that Methodists of them, unless we except the first, on of a less useful character have already which, from the few extracts that are got the start of them. These enthusiquoted from it, enough appears to be astic ranters have spread themselves said. Indeed the writers in the Quar- over the colony, and gone beyond its terly Review do not always conde- limits, encouraging idleness, by inscend to give even a description of the structing the natives in their own pework they place at the head of the culiar doctrines, and in nothing else, as article, and whose merits or demerits is but too apparent in their filthy and one expects to have pointed out, that wretched establishments, swarming the reader may be assisted in judging with Hottentots still in a state of nawhether it is or is not worth purchas-kedness, or in their ancient sheep-skin ing. In proof of this, to go no farther, I refer to article 9 of the present num- | ber. Its title is-Essays on the Institutions, Government, and Manners of the States of Antient Greece. BY HENRY DAVID HILL, D. D. But on this work, except producing a meagre table of contents, the Reviewer has said absolutely nothing; and yet he has written forty octavo pages. I do not say that these pages are destitute of interest, but it is a manifest perversion of language to call them a review; they are a distinct dissertation. This is not the place to enter into it, or I could perhaps satisfactorily account for this mode of reviewing. A celebrated publisher some years ago advised authors never to furnish a table of contents to their works. The reason is obvious. Reviewers read these, and without reading any thing farther, they write their review. Such reviews are perfectly deceptive, and a mere imposition upon the public.

The article on the Colonization of the Cape, with this exception-that it is not a Review, is, taken as a whole, a valuable article, supposing the information it contains to be authentic. I cannot prove that it is not, and yet I confess my faith in its accuracy was No. 14.-VOL. II.

clothing. Instead of expressing their gratitude to their Creator in hymns and songs, the Methodist Hottentots do nothing but whimper, whine, and groan."

This passage contains more charges against that denomination of Christians than is usually met with in so small a compass. The question is, Are these charges true or false?

On the first of these, it is not necessary to say much; it may however be proper to remark one or two things. The Reviewer considers the Moravians a superior class of Methodists; now really this betrays a degree of inaccuracy, not to say ignorance, not very honourable to a public censor; for, first, the term Methodist properly applies only to the followers of Wesley and Whitfield, to whom it was originally given at Oxford. Its application

to the Moravians is at once novel and absurd. And,

Secondly, Because, though it is readily admitted that the Moravians have been, and continue to be a useful people, yet it is denied that they have been more useful than the Methodists. In this country there is hardly any comparison between the moral and religious good which have been effected

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by these two denominations. The labours of the former have been confined to a very few places in the kingdom; the labours of the latter are nearly coextensive with the kingdom | itself, having penetrated, not only cities and market towns, but also vil-siast; that is, he is passionately fond lages and hamlets. That the former have been useful in turning many from darkness to light, is granted: but these sink into perfect insignificance, in the presence of that multitude, who, through Methodist instrumentality, have been brought to a life of piety and virtue. Nor has their usefulness been confined merely to one or two classes of society, but has diffused itself through all its various gradations. Even persons of no religion are so convinced of the moral and civil advantages of Methodism, that in many places they cheerfully contribute to its support. This is particularly the case in some of the more populous districts in this kingdom, and which, their enemies themselves being judges, in times of popular commotion, would often have furnished scenes of anarchy and blood, but for the tranquillizing influence of Methodism.

Enthusiasm is often used in a good sense as merely signifying a passionate ardour. Take, for example, the following expressions:- He is, in politics, or in painting, or in music, or in poetry, or in sculpture, quite an enthu

That the Moravians have been useful in distant lands also, both in the torid and the frigid zones; and that their missionaries have furnished some striking and truly apostolic examples of zeal, and patience, and perseverance-are facts which one feels a pleasure in recording; but it is equally correct that Methodist missionaries have furnished examples not less striking-examples of zeal, and patience, and perseverance, and success, which have rarely been equalled, and perhaps never surpassed by any denomination of Christians in either modern or ancient times, the period of the apostles alone excepted. In making this statement, the object is not to depreciate the Moravians, who are highly entitled to the esteem of the Christian world, but to rescue a bòdy of Christians, who are not less entitled to that esteem, from the wanton aspersions of bigotry.

The Reviewer charges them with being enthusiasts. What an enthusiast is, he has not told us. It is good policy sometimes, not to define terms. Want of definition gives an opportunity to escape by replying-O you misunderstood me, I did not mean THAT.

of these. A man who is destitute of enthusiasm, will never excel in any of the arts. In relation to these, it is a good thing; but the moment it is employed in religion, it becomes a bad one. How is this? Is it right to be passionately fond of science, and wrong to be so of religion? Right, to be zealous in the propagation of political truth; and wrong, to be so in the propagation of those truths which are able to make men wise unto salvation? Right, in ardently entering into those plans which have for their object the temporal emolument and aggrandisement of a nation; and wrong, when that ardour is employed in rescuing immortal spirits from eternal perdition? Should not our ardour be regulated by the importance of the subject in which it is engaged? But if so, should there not be more of this, more of (what in application to other subjects is called) enthusiasm in religion than in any thing else? Will not even the Reviewer himself, if he think there is any such thing as religion, be obliged to admit this?

But that he does not intend the word in a good sense, is evident from his joining it to Ranters. A Ranter, Dr. Johnson tells us, is a ranting fellow : and to rant, is to rave in VIOLENT or highsounding language. The passage under consideration is a fine specimen of this kind. Whether the Reviewer intended it as such, it would perhaps be too much, confidently to assert; but as the sense so exactly echoes to the sound, there is strong ground for such a supposition: but though the Reviewer has a clear and indisputable title to this character, what wisdom has he furnished, that it has any application to the Methodist missionaries? None. He indeed raves in violent language about them; but this only proves that he himself is a ranter, and leaves them, for any evidence adduced by him, as innocent of ranting as St. Paul. As reviewers sometimes say-" it so happens that we know," so I say-it so happens that I know something of the Methodist missionaries in Africa, and that they are not enthusiastic ranters,

I admit that " nature," or

"Nature may appoint new laws,

Cut off the effect from its connected cause,"

but men of genuine piety, and unble-selves?
mished morals; of clear, and sound, rather the God of
and masculine understandings; men
of minds sufficiently cultivated to be-
come writers in the Quarterly Review,
had they been favoured with a talent
at ranting; and men who are indefati-wrought in the case before us.
gable in their exertions to promote the
best interests of the Hottentots, both
in relation to this life, and the life to

come.

66

But these missionaries, it seems, encourage idleness." And this they do, first, by teaching them (the Hottentots) their peculiar doctrines. What these are, he has not told us; but as "idleness" is the result of such teaching, they must of course be doctrines by which idleness is promoted; for the effect must agree with the cause. To affirm that their “peculiar doctrines” do not promote idleness, and yet that idleness is encouraged by their peculiar doctrines, is a direct contradiction, and therefore impossible.

but I demand proof of the Quarterly Reviewer that such a miracle has been If the

obvious tendency of a doctrine be to promote an imitation of Jesus Christ, though that doctrine may fail to produce that imitation, it is morally impossible that it should produce its opposite.

be conformed to this world, but transformed by the renewing of his mind;"

But it is not true that they teach nothing but the doctrines of the gospel, which, perhaps, if the Reviewer meant any thing but to declaim, is the only thing intended by "their own peculiar doctrines," supposing that they neglected to preach the duties of Christianity. But in this also he greatly errs, for they strenuously maintain that every real Christian is created in Christ Jesus unto good works;-that he is bound to "present his body a What the doctrines are which pro-living sacrifice unto God, and not to duce the evil complained of, it is difficult to conjecture. I am well acquainted with the doctrines preached by the missionaries, but cannot perceive any connection between them and idleness. They preach repentance towards God; but surely there is no necessary connection between being sorry for sin, deeply humbled on account of it, hating it, and putting it away, and idleness. They preach faith in the Lord Jesus Christ,-faith in him as the Redeemer of the world, who came to make an atonement for sin by his death, to procure pardon for every penitent sinner who believes in his name, -and to regenerate and sanctify them by his spirit; and who will finally come to judge the world, when he will reward diligent or faithful servants, and punish idle or unprofitable ones. They preach, that Christians are to imitate the example of Christ, and to be followers of God. But is this to "encourage idleness?" Is it possible to utter a grosser libel on him who went about doing good?

But they encourage idleness, it seems, secondly, by teaching them "nothing else." Suppose they dont teach any thing else, what then? Is there not enough in the above to prove that idleness cannot possibly be the result of their teaching, unless it be in the nature of doctrines to produce an effect directly the reverse of them

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and to “glorify God in his body and in his spirit, which are God's." They not only teach them (the Hottentots) the duties which they immediately owe to God, but also those which they owe to themselves and to each other. And among other things they do not fail to teach our Lord's golden rule-“ As ye would that others should do to you, do ye even so to them;"-and to enforce that law as the constant rule of life, one of whose precepts is, Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour;-rules with which our Reviewer seems unacquainted, or, if acquainted with them, rules which he practically rejects, whilst he betrays the rancour of his spirit by uttering the grossest falsehood with the most shameless effrontery.

But, in addition to teaching religion and morality, they also teach the arts of civilization. The Rev. Mr. Shaw, a Methodist missionary, has introduced among the Hottentots the English plough, and has shewn them how they may perform as much labour with four oxen, as they formerly could perform with twelve. He has erected a smith's shop among them, by which means they arc supplied with a variety of implements of great importance to their convenience and comfort, of which they before were destitute.

He has

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