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impiously been derided, even in a Court | tendency calculated to promote social of Judicature, we find a code of laws happiness: but the Saviour of manmore purely moral than could have en-kind not only died for our redemption, tered into the human imagination; for, but became the first-fruits of them to make use of the enlightened Mr. that slept; "for since by man came Locke's expressions, it has God for death, by man came also the resurrecits author, Truth for its matter, and tion of the dead!" for its end universal Salvation.”

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Shall a work then, embracing such a noble and disinterested motive, be wantonly exposed to insult and derision? or the daring exposer, with unparalleled effrontery, in the very face of his accusers, glory in the mischief he has done? Yet such evidently was the conduct of the man to whom I am alluding, who was treated with a degree of lenity almost amounting to reprehensible; though doubtless wiser heads than mine, had substantial reasons for this unexpected kind of forbearance. We doubtless have had a recent instance of the popularity attached to any individual supposed to be harshly used; or Hunt would never have made such a splendid entry into the metropolis of England.

It is this glorious resurrection alone, which inspires the heart of the devout Christian with the sustaining hope of future blessedness; for, as St. Paul says, "if the Spirit of Him who raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, He that raised up Christ from the dead, shall also quicken your mortal bodies."

"The ancient heathen might say, and the unbelieving libertine may still say, Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die;" observes Bishop Porteus, in his admirable lectures: "but where is the Christian mad enough to make such a declaration? With what resignation will the truly pious submit to poverty and misfortune, when they reflect, that if they bear them patiently, and hold fast their integrity, those

moment, shall work out for them a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory."

Politics and party measures, how-light afflictions, which are but for a ever, are totally unconnected with the preceding and following observations, which are intended to prove, that the Sacred Writings were inspired by a gracious and all-merciful God, and whoever would attain a perfect knowledge of the means of salvation, must search the Scriptures. "The Old and New Testament," observes an admired writer, like two mirrors placed at a little distance, reflect a mutual light upon each other;" and our blessed Saviour assured his disciples, that he would send the Spirit, to guide them into the light of Truth.

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The more attentively we peruse that sacred volume, the more perfectly shall we fulfil the varying duties of our station, for it appears impossible that a true Christian can venture to act in opposition to the Almighty's commands. Religion," says one of the most exemplary of judges, Sir Matthew Hale, teaches and tutors the soul to a high reverence and veneration of Almighty God, a sincere and upright walking, as if in the presence of the invisible Creator of the world; it regulates and governs the passions of the mind, and brings them under due moderation." If the precepts of the gospel stopped here, and did not open unto us the joys of eternity, it surely then must be allowed to have a

Though the Christian Religion is calculated to impart comfort to the afflicted, and to bring consolation to the meek, yet it is the resurrection of our Redeemer, which is in itself sufficient to reconcile us to the varying distresses of human life; for the resurrection of Christ, is a fact too well authenticated, to leave a shadow of doubt in the believer's mind.

Amongst the varying codes of moral laws, which different nations have circulated, where shall we find any that can equal our blessed Saviour's sermon from the mount? where shall we behold such a refinement of morality, blended with the purity of such an unostentatious religion?

That there should be Atheists in the world, appears to me as one of those incomprehensibilities, for which the sagest of philosophers is unable to account, as all nature seems so clearly to proclaim a Creator, that it must be obstinacy, or wilful blindness, which entertains a doubt! "The meanest insect we behold, and the most contemptible weed we tread upon," says Dr. Balguy, are in themselves sufficient to announce the vivifying hand of God; but if we direct our eyes to

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the sublimer scenes of nature, and fix stroy the hopes of an hereafter, can them upon the starry firmament, will never, in this enlightened age, be toleman then presume to declare that ob-rated? jects so sublime and beautiful are merely the effect of chance?"

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A friend of Lord Chesterfield's, during his last illness, recommended him to read Seed's sermons, particularly that, which was calculated to prove the Existence of God. I have read," said his lordship, some of Seed's sermons, and like them very much; but the one you allude to, I have not; as it would be too great a disparagement of that reason which has been bestowed upon me, could I entertain a doubt of the existence of God. If I believe in my own existence, I must believe in a Creator's; for as Cato very justly says,' And that He is, all nature cries aloud!"

I desire to be dissolved, and to be with Christ, (says the holy apostle, St. Paul;)-and this conviction was forcibly impressed upon the heart of a being who had been one of the strongest opposers of the propagation of the gospel! May that allseeing Power, which wrought that miraculous change in the heart of this enlightened apostle, produce a similar effect in the mind of that man, to whom, at the commencement of this treatise, Í have indirectly alluded; and may the Spirit of the Holy One so shine upon him, as to enable him truly and sincerely to repent!

66

Shall I forgive my brother seven times, if he offends me? was an inquiry made by one of the disciples to his gracious Master; and the answer ought to be written in characters which the hand of time could never efface: "Not only seven times," replied our blessed Saviour, but seventy times seven!" What a lesson is this to erring humanity! how affectionately kind is the precept it conveys! "If ye forgive not men their trespasses," said our Redeemer, “how can ye expect God will forgive you?" If there was no life after this, if we were to die like the beasts which perish, and merely viewed Christianity as a code of moral laws; where shall we find any thing to be compared to it, in the different parts of the globe? But as death does not put a final period to our existence, but when this short life is ended we shall enter into a state of happiness or wretchedness, how necessary becomes the inquiry which the gaoler put to Paul and Silas, "What must I do to be saved?" This is an in

I find myself again diverging from the subject of the present treatise, which is to recommend to each individual the study of the Holy Scriptures; for the genuine Christianity they inculcate will, like pure gold tried in the furnace, appear more brilliant, from Atheistical discussions. Though the writings of the celebrated Dr. Beattie may be known to the generality of my readers, yet I cannot resist the inclination I feel to make an extract from one of his compositions: speaking of those who are elevated by fortune, and who seem not to require the sustaining aid of religion, he says, "Caressed by the great, engrossed by the fopperies and formalities of life, intoxicated with vanity, or pampered by adulation, they have little need of, and perhaps find little relish in, the practical performance of the duties of religion. But let them know, that in the solitary scenes of life, there is many a tender heart pining with incurable anguish,pierced with the sharp stings of disap-quiry which deserves the utmost atpointment,-bereft of friends,-chilled with poverty,-racked with disease, and scourged by the oppressor's lash; whom nothing could save from despair, or desperation, but a firm reliance upon the future retribution of an all-merciful Providence." And would they, with sacrilegious hands, attempt to violate this last refuge of the miserable, and rob them of the only comfort they have left? Would they deprive them of those blessings which the sacred writings promise to all those who truly, and sincerely repent? Surely the wretches who would endeavour to de

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tention; but the prophet Micah has answered it in very concise terms,"Do justice, and love mercy, and walk humbly with thy God."

Since Christianity has had its rise, there have been found cavillers who have attempted to defame it; but that excellent man, Dr. Doddridge, has declared that its course gains by debate ;

for the Gospel" he adds, " comes like fine gold out of a furnace, more brilliant, and approved, the more it is tried."

"We live in a dissolute, though enlightened age," observes that much

impiously been derided, even in a Court | tendency calculated to promote social

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Shall a work then, embracing such a noble and disinterested motive, be wantonly exposed to insult and derision? or the daring exposer, with unparalleled effrontery, in the very face of his accusers, glory in the mischief he has done? Yet such evidently was the conduct of the man to whom I am alluding, who was treated with a degree of lenity almost amounting to reprehensible; though doubtless wiser heads than mine, had substantial reasons for this unexpected kind of forbearance. We doubtless have had a recent instance of the popularity attached to any individual supposed to be harshly used; or Hunt would never have made such a splendid entry into the metropolis of England.

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happiness: but the Saviour of mankind not only died for our redemption, but became the first-fruits of them that slept; "for since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead!"

It is this glorious resurrection alone, which inspires the heart of the devout Christian with the sustaining hope of future blessedness; for, as St. Paul says, "if the Spirit of Him who raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, He that raised up Christ from the dead, shall also quicken your mortal bodies."

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"The ancient heathen might say, and the unbelieving libertine may still say, Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die;" observes Bishop Porteus, in his admirable lectures: “ but where is the Christian mad enough to make such a declaration? With what resignation will the truly pious submit to poverty and misfortune, when they reflect, that if they bear them patiently, and hold fast their integrity, those

moment, shall work out for them a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory."

Politics and party measures, how-light afflictions, which are but for a ever, are totally unconnected with the preceding and following observations, which are intended to prove, that the Sacred Writings were inspired by a gracious and all-merciful God, and whoever would attain a perfect knowledge of the means of salvation, must search the Scriptures. The Old and New Testament," observes an admired writer, like two mirrors placed at a little distance, reflect a mutual light upon each other;" and our blessed Saviour assured his disciples, that he would send the Spirit, to guide them into the light of Truth.

66

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The more attentively we peruse that sacred volume, the more perfectly shall we fulfil the varying duties of our station, for it appears impossible that a true Christian can venture to act in opposition to the Almighty's commands. Religion," says one of the most exemplary of judges, Sir Matthew Hale, teaches and tutors the soul to a high reverence and veneration of Almighty God, a sincere and upright walking, as if in the presence of the invisible Creator of the world; it regulates and governs the passions of the mind, and brings them under due moderation." If the precepts of the gospel stopped here, and did not open unto us the joys of eternity, it surely then must be allowed to have a

Though the Christian Religion is calculated to impart comfort to the afflicted, and to bring consolation to the meek, yet it is the resurrection of our Redeemer, which is in itself sufficient to reconcile us to the varying distresses of human life; for the resurrection of Christ, is a fact too well authenticated, to leave a shadow of doubt in the believer's mind.

Amongst the varying codes of moral laws, which different nations have circulated, where shall we find any that can equal our blessed Saviour's sermon from the mount? where shall we behold such a refinement of morality, blended with the purity of such an unostentatious religion?

That there should be Atheists in the world, appears to me as one of those incomprehensibilities, for which the sagest of philosophers is unable to account, as all nature seems so clearly to proclaim a Creator, that it must be obstinacy, or wilful blindness, which entertains a doubt! "The meanest insect we behold, and the most contemptible weed we tread upon," says Dr. Balguy, “are in themselves sufficient to announce the vivifying hand of God; but if we direct our eyes to

the sublimer scenes of nature, and fix stroy the hopes of an hereafter, can them upon the starry firmament, will never, in this enlightened age, be toleman then presume to declare that ob-rated? jects so sublime and beautiful are merely the effect of chance?"

66

66

A friend of Lord Chesterfield's, during his last illness, recommended him to read Seed's sermons, particularly that, which was calculated to prove the Existence of God. I have read," said his lordship, some of Seed's sermons, and like them very much; but the one you allude to, I have not; as it would be too great a disparagement of that reason which has been bestowed upon me, could I entertain a doubt of the existence of God. If I believe in my own existence, I must believe in a Creator's; for as Cato very justly says, And that He is, all nature cries aloud!'"

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I find myself again diverging from the subject of the present treatise, which is to recommend to each individual the study of the Holy Scriptures; for the genuine Christianity they inculcate will, like pure gold tried in the furnace, appear more brilliant, from Atheistical discussions. Though the writings of the celebrated Dr. Beattie may be known to the generality of my readers, yet I cannot resist the inclination I feel to make an extract from one of his compositions: speaking of those who are elevated by fortune, and who seem not to require the sustaining aid of religion, he says, "Caressed by the great, engrossed by the fopperies and formalities of life, intoxicated with vanity, or pampered by adulation, they have little need of, and perhaps find little relish in, the practical performance of the duties of religion. But let them know, that in the solitary scenes of life, there is many a tender heart pining with incurable anguish,— pierced with the sharp stings of disappointment,-bereft of friends,-chilled with poverty,-racked with disease, and scourged by the oppressor's lash; whom nothing could save from despair, or desperation, but a firm reliance upon the future retribution of an all-merciful Providence." And would they, with sacrilegious hands, attempt to violate this last refuge of the miserable, and rob them of the only comfort they have left? Would they deprive them of those blessings which the sacred writings promise to all those who truly, and sincerely repent? Surely the wretches who would endeavour to de

I desire to be dissolved, and to be with Christ, (says the holy apostle, St. Paul;)-and this conviction was forcibly impressed upon the heart of a being who had been one of the strongest opposers of the propagation of the gospel! May that allseeing Power, which wrought that miraculous change in the heart of this enlightened apostle, produce a similar effect in the mind of that man, to whom, at the commencement of this treatise, Í have indirectly alluded; and may the Spirit of the Holy One so shine upon him, as to enable him truly and sincerely to repent!

Shall I forgive my brother seven times, if he offends me? was an inquiry made by one of the disciples to his gracious Master; and the answer ought to be written in characters which the hand of time could never efface: "Not only seven times," replied our blessed Saviour, "but seventy times seven!" What a lesson is this to erring humanity! how affectionately kind is the precept it conveys! "If ye forgive not men their trespasses," said our Redeemer, "how can ye expect God will forgive you?" If there was no life after this, if we were to die like the beasts which perish, and merely viewed Christianity as a code of moral laws; where shall we find any thing to be compared to it, in the different parts of the globe? But as death does not put a final period to our existence, but when this short life is ended we shall enter into a state of happiness or wretchedness, how necessary becomes the inquiry which the gaoler put to Paul and Silas, "What must I do to be saved?" This is an inquiry which deserves the utmost attention; but the prophet Micah has answered it in very concise terms,"Do justice, and love mercy, and walk humbly with thy God."

Since Christianity has had its rise, there have been found cavillers who have attempted to defame it; but that excellent man, Dr. Doddridge, has declared that its course gains by debate;

for the Gospel" he adds," comes like fine gold out of a furnace, more brilliant, and approved, the more it is tried."

66

We live in a dissolute, though enlightened age," observes that much

impiously been derided, even in a Court | tendency calculated to promote social of Judicuture, we find a code of laws happiness: but the Saviour of manmore purely moral than could have en-kind not only died for our redemption, tered into the human imagination; for, but became the first-fruits of them to make use of the enlightened Mr. that slept; "for since by man came Locke's expressions, it has God for death, by man came also the resurrecits author, Truth for its matter, and tion of the dead!" for its end universal Salvation."

66

Shall a work then, embracing such a noble and disinterested motive, be wantonly exposed to insult and derision? or the daring exposer, with unparalleled effrontery, in the very face of his accusers, glory in the mischief he has done? Yet such evidently was the conduct of the man to whom I am alluding, who was treated with a degree of lenity almost amounting to reprehensible; though doubtless wiser heads than mine, had substantial reasons for this unexpected kind of forbearance. We doubtless have had a recent instance of the popularity attached to any individual supposed to be harshly used; or Hunt would never have made such a splendid entry into the metropolis of England.

It is this glorious resurrection alone, which inspires the heart of the devout Christian with the sustaining hope of future blessedness; for, as St. Paul says, " if the Spirit of Him who raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, He that raised up Christ from the dead, shall also quicken your mortal bodies."

"The ancient heathen might say, and the unbelieving libertine may still say, Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die;" observes Bishop Porteus, in his admirable lectures: “but where is the Christian mad enough to make such a declaration? With what resignation will the truly pious submit to poverty and misfortune, when they reflect, that if they bear them patiently, and hold fast their integrity, those Politics and party measures, how-light afflictions, which are but for a ever, are totally unconnected with the moment, shall work out for them a preceding and following observations, far more exceeding and eternal weight which are intended to prove, that the of glory." Sacred Writings were inspired by a gracious and all-merciful God, and whoever would attain a perfect knowledge of the means of salvation, must search the Scriptures. "The Old and New Testament," observes an admired writer, like two mirrors placed at a little distance, reflect a mutual light upon each other;" and our blessed Saviour assured his disciples, that he would send the Spirit, to guide them into the light of Truth.

66

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The more attentively we peruse that sacred volume, the more perfectly shall we fulfil the varying duties of our station, for it appears impossible that a true Christian can venture to act in opposition to the Almighty's commands. Religion," says one of the most exemplary of judges, Sir Matthew Hale, teaches and tutors the soul to a high reverence and veneration of Almighty God, a sincere and upright walking, as if in the presence of the invisible Creator of the world; it regulates and governs the passions of the mind, and brings them under due moderation." If the precepts of the gospel stopped here, and did not open unto us the joys of eternity, it surely then must be allowed to have a

Though the Christian Religion is calculated to impart comfort to the afflicted, and to bring consolation to the meek, yet it is the resurrection of our Redeemer, which is in itself sufficient to reconcile us to the varying distresses of human life; for the resurrection of Christ, is a fact too well authenticated, to leave a shadow of doubt in the believer's mind.

Amongst the varying codes of moral laws, which different nations have circulated, where shall we find any that can equal our blessed Saviour's sermon from the mount? where shall we behold such a refinement of morality, blended with the purity of such an unostentatious religion?

That there should be Atheists in the world, appears to me as one of those incomprehensibilities, for which the sagest of philosophers is unable to account, as all nature seems so clearly to proclaim a Creator, that it must be obstinacy, or wilful blindness, which entertains a doubt! "The meanest insect we behold, and the most contemptible weed we tread upon," says Dr. Balguy, are in themselves sufficient to announce the vivifying hand of God; but if we direct our eyes to

66

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