History and digest of the international arbitration to which the United States has been a party, 1권

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THE GENEVA ARBITRATIONContinued
4
The Delagoa Bay RailwayContinued Page
5
Gepets Recall 4410
6
Preliminary Meeting of Commissioners
7
The Alleged Seizure and Detention 1189
8
CONVENTION
9
Mr Fishs Instructions 1702
11
CONTRACT CLAIMSContinued
12
Selection of the Third Commissioner
13
Provisions for Arbitration 1469
15
Depositions of Indians
20
Fulfillment of the Treaty of Peace
27
Declaration
29
CONVENTION WITH FRANCE OF JULY 4 1831 4447
31
Meaning of Term Property 4472
38
Origin of the Case 1807
42
CHAPTER II
45
Instructions of 1751 1998
49
Commissions of Governors of Nova Scotia
51
Conclusion of an Agreement 1040
55
General Arbitral Agreement 1287
58
Signature of the Award
60
Decision of the Commission 27
61
The Highlands
66
Morriss Recall 4414
67
Further Correspondence 1704
68
Appointment of Commissioners
72
Organization of the Commission 1046
73
Commencement of Surveys
74
Northwesternmost Head of Connecticut River
80
Public Sessions 1473
81
Skipwiths Report 4414
83
CHAPTER
85
Convention of Arbitration 1709
88
Case of Cotesworth Powell 2050
90
Design of the Treaty of 1783
91
Decree of Jannary 4 1795 4414
92
Report of Special Committee
97
First Meeting of the Commissioners 1296
99
Northwest Angle of Nova Scotia
101
Term Atlantic Ocean
107
Question of the Highlands
109
American Definitive Statement
113
Fortyfifth Parallel of North Latitude
119
Analysis of Award
136
The Vivanco Insurrection 1593
137
CHAPTER XLIX
142
Suggestion of Mr Hale
143
Mediation
146
Appointment of Commissioners 1710
147
Mr Websters Plan of Settlement 118
150
Compensation of Maine and Massachusetts
151
Difference as to the Treaties of 1778 4429
152
Awards Inconclusive as to Private Interests 4506
154
Debate in the Senate 1099
155
Map used by American Commissioners in 1782
156
BOUNDARY THROUGH THE RIVER ST LAWRENCE AND LAKES ONTA
162
The Umpires 1299
165
Provocations 1516
166
Free Navigation of Channels
170
CHAPTER L
171
Relative Positions of Commissioners
176
Views of American Commissioner
181
Claim of British Commissioner
182
Propositions of Compromise
188
The Secretaries 1305
190
Comments on the Settlement
194
CHAPTER XXVI
195
Convention between the United States and Venezuela of Decem
195
Grounds of American Territorial Claim
198
CONVENTION
199
Execution of the Convention 4432
200
An Erroneous Assumption 4455
201
Ukase of 1821
204
Instructions of Mr Rives 4458
208
Fiftyfour Forty or Fight
210
Opinion of AttorneyGeneral Black 1602
212
The Gorostiza Pamphlet 1213
213
Provisions for Arbitration 1551
215
British Proposal for Marking Boundary
216
American Commissioners Views
220
British Commissioners Special Instructions
222
Proposal of Arbitration 996
226
Summary of Arguments 1606
227
British Agent
228
Other Boundaries
235
CHAPTER XXXVII
237
PROCEDURE 2133
240
Rules
241
Retrocession of Louisiana to France 4433
244
EAST AND WEST FLORIDA CLAIMS 4519
246
Reply of United States Counsel
248
Duration of Companys Rights
252
Negotiation of a Convention 1216
254
Claims Included 4591
256
Discussion of Stipulations 997
257
Possessory Rights
260
United States Commissioners Opinion
266
Berlin Decree 4479
267
Convention of April 11 1839 1218
270
Provisions of Treaty of Peace
272
Commissioners Opinion on La Abra Claim 1327
277
American Commissioners
278
Question as to Finality of Awards
280
Organization of the Commission 1711
281
Practical Difficulties
286
Delays in the Exchange of Ratifications 4592
287
Final Meeting and Rupture
292
Rules of Procedure 4539
293
Mr Evartss Report 1331
296
Convention of January 8 1802
298
CHAPTER XXII
299
Defects in Jurisdiction 1647
303
Order in Council January 8 1794
305
CASE OF THE MASONIC 1055
306
Course of Genet
311
Extension of Time 4540
312
The Pious Fund 1318
317
First Meeting of Commissioners
320
Loughboroughs Opinion
326
POWER OF ARBITRATORS TO DETERMINE QUESTIONS AS TO THEIR
327
The Conjectural Note 4436
329
Question as to Exhausting Judicial Remedies
332
Opinion of Mr Johnson 1502
335
Appointment of Umpire 1224
336
Resumption in 1802
339
Secretaries and Agents 1617
344
Immunities of Commissioners
345
The Montano Claim 1649
346
CHAPTER XXVIII
350
Mixed Commissions under Convention of June 30 July 12 1822
363
British Claim of Impressment 843
365
Commission of 186768 1659
366
Rules of Procedure 4437
371
Proceedings of the Commission 1618
374
Claims for Slaves 685
377
Proceedings of Commission 1000
386
Statement of Facts 1814
389
CHAPTER XII
391
Final Report 1619
392
Commissioners Report 1555
394
Declination of Mr Van Buren 97
400
Cooperation of Umpire and Commissioners
404
Mr E A Hopkins 1502
405
Legislation 4609
409
Case of the Cresle
410
Privateering Instructions of 1810 4550
411
CASE OF THE COLONEL LLOYD ASPINWALL 1007
413
Reports to the Umpire 1230
414
List of Claims Before the Commission
416
Arrest and Imprisonment 1815
418
Unfinished Business and its Cause 1232
420
Arbitration as to Damages 1013
423
CHAPTER XIII
426
Services of the Umpire 1237
427
Hearings 1716
430
Views of United States Commissioner and Surveyor
433
APPENDIX II
435
What Coasts were and were not to be examined
439
Wreck of the Canada 1733
440
Records of the Commission 1557
443
Argentine Republic See Brazil and Paraguay
449
Remonstrances 4550
451
Text of the Umpires Award 419
459
Text of the Umpires AwardContinued Page No 4 Pinnette
460
Cardigan
461
Souris
462
Crapaud
463
Stanley
464
Pierre Jacques
465
Enmore
466
The Miramichi
467
Questions to be Arbitrated 1819
468
The River Liverpool in the Province of Nova Scotia
480
The River Pictou in the Province of Nova Scotia
481
The Pawcatuck River the Boundary between the States of Connecticut and Rhode Island
482
The Rivers Vernon Orwell Seal Cardigan Fortune Souris Tryon Winter Hunter Stanley Ellis Pierre Jacques Percival Enmore and Haldiman in Prince ...
483
The Murray River in Prince Edward Island
484
The Foxley River in Prince Edward Island
485
The River Des Habitans in the Island of Cape Breton Province of Nova Scotia
486
The River Hudson in the State of New York United States
487
The Rivers Saint John and Minganm on the North Coast of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the River Jupïter in the Island of Anticosti Province of Ca...
488
The River Fox in the Island of Anticosti Province of Canada
489
The Rivers Grand Bonaventure and Grand Casca Pediac Province of Canada and River Caraquette Province of New Brunswick
490
The Rivers Susquehanna North East Elk and Sassafras
491
Chester River
492
Patuxent River
493
CHAPTER XIV
495
Seizure of the Montijo 1421
496
The Belligerency Question 1558
499
Naturalization Question
501
Unpropitious Conditions
507
Terms of the Convention 4563
509
Reference to the Court of Claims 1102
512
Papers Relating to Spanish Claims 4462
515
Organization of the Commission 1640
517
Motleys Interview with Lord Clarendon
519
Diplomatic Protests 1056
524
Mr Sumners Memorandum
525
Lord Granvilles Response
531
Procedure of the Commission
537
Spanish Blockades 4488
538
Propriety of Arbitration 1105
539
Agreement as to the Alabama Claims
543
Proceedings of the Commission 1641
545
Provisions as to Alabama Claims
547
Other Subjects Included
553
Rules of Commissions
555
Opening of the Arbitration
559
CHAPTER LXVI
560
Suspension of Diplomatic Relations 4493
561
THE VAN NESS CONVENTION 4533
562
Trent Case
565
Action of the House 4466
566
The Portuguese Title 1910
571
The Three Rules
572
Agreement of Arbitration 1735
576
Position of Spain 4534
577
The Rappahannock
578
Hospitalities to the Confederates
582
Case of the Alexandra
586
Representations to Colombia 1422
588
Award 1742
589
Appointment of a Special Commissioner 1612
590
The British Case
593
AGREEMENT OF FEBRUARY 12 1871 1019
595
International Rights and Duties
598
Action in France 4466
601
The Spanish Volunteers 1020
602
Contraband and Blockade Running
604
Meaning of Due Diligence
610
Limits of Neutral Duty
616
Announcement by Mr Staempfli
618
Decrees as to Infidencia 1021
619
Hospitalities to Confederates
622
CHAPTER LXVII
623
Decree of January 3 1808 4494
624
Statements of American Commissioners
628
Terms of the Submission 1749
631
Draft of Articles
634
Agreement of Arbitration 1914
635
Demands for Redress 1032
638
Lord Tenterdens Suggestion
641
Charges of Mismanagement 1105
643
New General Arguments Refused
647
Evidence 1750
648
Case of the Florida 619
649
Notice of Organization 4566
654
Effect of a Commission 635
655
Message of December 7 1835 4466
658
Administrative and Judicial Proceedings 1057
660
Arbitrators Expressions as to British Feeling
661
Grounds of the Award 1064
664
Baron Roennes Reports 1238
664
Payment of the Award
665
Ratification of the Treaty 4497
667
Expenses of the Arbitration
669
Rule of Decision 1750
670
Failure to Request Accession to the Three Rules 666
671
Mexico and the United States
676
An Incident of the Alabamas Escape
678
CHAPTER XXIII
683
Claims Distinct from Alabama Claims 683 1
684
Fenian Raids
686
Presentation of Claims 1423
688
Awards against Peru 1646
690
Mutual Renunciations of Claims 4498
691
Reports of the Agents
692
The Awards 1757
693
Hostilities at Fayal 1071
695
MINOR OR PENDING CASES 1855
698
Payment of Final Award
699
The Award 1943
700
Origin of the Fund 4627
702
CHAPTER XVI
703
Imperial Act of 1819
710
Action of Colonial Authorities
713
Conclusion of the Convention 1133
715
Proceedings 1945
716
Claims Allowed 4628
717
XXV Treaty of Washington
719
Powers of Consuls 4400
722
Appointment of the Halifax Commissioners
725
Arrest and Imprisonment of Mr Santos 1579
729
Taking of Testimony
731
The Award 1964
732
Jurisdiction of the Commission 1134
733
The Liberty to Land
737
Benefits of the Protective Service
738
Miscellaneous Provisions 1135
739
CHAPTER XLVIII
740
War between France and Great Britain 4403
742
British Reply
744
National Responsibility for State Acts 1439
746
Reply of Lord Salisbury
750
The Kellett Case 1862
751
CHAPTER XVII
755
RussoBritish Convention of 1825
762
Joint Resolution of 1883 1663
764
Mr Frenchs Letter of 1881
769
Negotiations 1665
771
Mr Bayards Report 1793
774
Condemnation of Vessels
775
Conclusion of a Convention 4581
776
Negotiations in London
781
Negotiations at Washington
787
Lord Salisburys Argument on Questions of Right
793
Exceptional Character of the Claim 1693
795
NATIONALITY
796
Treaty of Arbitration 1969
797
APPENDIX III
798
Conclusion of a Treaty of Arbitration
799
New Modus Vivendi and the Question of Damages
805
Forgery of Translations
814
Further Arguments for the United States 844
815
HISTORICAL NOTES 4821
816
Question as to Embargoed Estates 1035
819
Representatives of the Argentine Republic and Brazil 1969
820
Counter Case of United States
821
Printed Argument of Mr Carter the Nature of Law
827
Seizure of the San Fernando 1700
829
The Institution of Property
833
Mr Phelpss Written Argument
839
Question of Protection Apart froin Property
849
CHAPTER LV
853
Difference between Seals and Certain Wild Animals
856
The Right to Protect the Industry
864
Oral Argument of Sir Charles Russell
870
Novelty of Claim of United States
876
The Nature of the Seal
882
The Sealing Industry
889
Examination of the Authorities cited by the United States
895
The Argumentum ad Hominem the Pearl Fisheries
901
Question as to Procedure
907
Shorthand Reports
910
Instructions of Mr Webster 1085
911
Recognition of Russian Rights by Great Britain
916
The Question of Regulations
922
Ninth Article
928
Text of the Award
935
The Result of the Award
957
Liability of Belligerents 1243
959
Protest on behalf of the Claimants 1097
960
Plans for Permanent Arbitration
963
Terms of Settlement 4581
969
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23 페이지 - St. Croix River to the highlands; along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St. Lawrence, from those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean, to the northwesternmost head of Connecticut River...
556 페이지 - Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective ; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
536 페이지 - Secondly, not to permit or suffer either belligerent to make use of its ports or waters as the. base of naval operations against the other, or for the purpose of the renewal or augmentation of military supplies or arms, or the recruitment of men. Thirdly, to exercise due diligence in its own ports and waters, and, as to all persons within its jurisdiction, to prevent any violation of the foregoing obligations and duties.
xcviii 페이지 - Superior; thence through Lake Superior northward of the Isles Royal and Phelipeaux, to the Long Lake; thence through the middle of said Long Lake, and the water communication between it and the Lake of the Woods, to the said Lake of the Woods; thence through the said lake to the most northwestern point thereof, and from thence on a due west course to the river Mississippi; thence by a line to be drawn along the middle of the said river Mississippi until it shall intersect the northernmost part of...
689 페이지 - Provided however, that the American fishermen shall be admitted to enter such bays or harbours for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever.
586 페이지 - He must determine what degree of force the crisis demands." The proclamation of blockade is itself official and conclusive evidence to the Court that a state of war existed which demanded and authorized a recourse to such a measure, under the circumstances, peculiar to the case.
444 페이지 - States fishermen by the Convention between the United States and Great Britain, signed at London on the 20th day of October, 1818, of taking, curing, and drying fish on certain coasts, of the British North American Colonies therein defined, the inhabitants of the United States shall have, in common with the subjects of Her Britannic Majesty, the liberty...
387 페이지 - The Commissioners so named shall meet at Washington at the earliest convenient period after they shall have been respectively named, and shall, before proceeding to any business, make and subscribe a solemn declaration that they will impartially and carefully examine and decide, to the best of their judgment, and according to justice and equity...
xcviii 페이지 - Lawrence; comprehending all islands within twenty leagues of any part of the shores of the United States, and lying between lines to be drawn due east from the points where the aforesaid boundaries between Nova Scotia on the one part, and East Florida on the other, shall respectively touch the Bay of Fundy and the Atlantic Ocean; excepting such islands as now are, or heretofore have been, within the limits of the said province of Nova Scotia.
200 페이지 - It is agreed that any country that may be claimed by either party on the north-west coast of America, westward of the Stony Mountains, shall, together with its harbors, bays, and creeks, and the navigation of all rivers within the same, be free and open for the term of ten years from the date of the signature of the present convention, to the vessels, citizens, and subjects, of the two powers...

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