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LANCASTER CHURCH.

JANUARY 3, 1852.

LANCASTER is the county town of Lancashire, and is pleasantly situated on an eminence on the Southern bank of the river Lune, at a distance of 240 miles N.N.W. from London.

It seems probable this was a station (Ad Alaunam) of the Romans; and a variety of Roman remains have from time to time been discovered here. It has been subjected to great vicissitudes. At the time of the conquest it had greatly declined: in 1322 and 1389 it was burnt by the Scots: in the wars of York and Lancaster it was depopulated, the inhabitants obstinately adhering to the Lancastrian party; and in later years it has suffered by fire. It is now, however, a prosperous and thriving town. The streets in the older portions are narrow, but the more modern parts are open and well built. The church and the castle are the most prominent objects in the place, and present an imposing A church is supposed to have existed here, on the site occupied by the present parish church, in Danish times, and possibly even earlier. Soon after the conquest, this church, dedicated to St.

aspect to the traveller.

Mary,

mond, and a lofty and well-proportioned tower, erected in 1759, at the west end. The body of the church has two stories, both with battlements; and the walls, excepting those of the tower and registry court, which are modern buildings, are of and pillars, which separate the nave from the siderude grout. The interior is lofty; and the arches aisles, extend nearly to the altar. The roof is of plain ribbed oak, with principals slightly ornasouth sides. The arch of the chancel is high and mented. Galleries extend on the north-west and large and light east window, is now at Caponwray pointed. The screen, anciently placed before the Hall. The stalls stretch along the breadth of the minating in pointed heads. Along the east wall, chancel, and contain a profusion of tracery, teron the north and south sides of the altar, are curious folding seats, twelve of which have dis

torted human figures, and foliage. These groin front of the chancel and vestry, have for many tesque carvings, and the beautiful workmanship ages attracted the notice of the curious, and will long continue to be admired as excellent speciaisles and clerestory are plain, and have the flatmens of ancient art. .... The windows in the tened arch of the fifteenth century. An arched cavity in the south wall of the church is supposed to have been anciently a baptistry.

was attached by Roger de Poictou to a Benedictine priory, which he founded here as a cell to the abbey of St. Martin de Seez, in Norandy. Various charters afterwards confirmed and enlarged the possessions of this house. But, when the alien monasteries were suppressed in the reign of Henry V., this priory of Lancaster was given in trust to certain bishops and others for the abbey of Sion, in Middlesex, and continued as a cell dependent upon it till the dissolution. lish architecture, and was probably erected soon The present edifice is in the later style of Eng-tinct, but do not exactly coincide with any of the after the transfer of the priory to Sion. It stands on the north-east side of the castle-hill, and is a commanding object, situated high above the town. 40 high, consists of a centre or nave, two side-aisles The church, about 143 feet long, 58 broad, and d chancel, a vestry and registry court of the Lancashire portion of the archdeaconry of Rich

"The sepulchral monuments in this church are numerous. .... A few years ago a small stone cross, adorned with entangled scrolls, the usual beneath the soil of the churchyard of St. Mary's. characteristics of Danish crosses, was discovered An inscription appears upon this cross in three lines of Runic characters, which are tolerably dis

No.922.

B

numerous varieties of alphabets published by Dr. Hickes, the lexicographer. The height of the cross is 3 feet; its breadth 1 foot 3 inches" *. enlarged by Roger de Poictou, and adapted for his residence; and in its present state it is used for the county courts.

The castle is not far from the church. It was

* Baines' History of Lancashire, vol. iv.

VOL. XXXII.

[graphic]

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN VOL. XXXII.

Buildings, Views, &c.-
Prov. viii. 17, Dccccxli. 281.
Prov. xxviii. 8, 27, Dccccxliv. 321.
Quarles, Francis, Dccccl. 409.
Raleigh, Sir Walter, DCCCCXxxvi. 215.
Reynolds, Dr. John, Dccccxxxiii. 161.
Roman Sepulchre, Dccccxlix. 393.
Saint's Bed, Dccccli. 425.

Salmon Catching, Dccccxxiv. 33.
Sidney, Sir Philip, Dccccxxviii. 89.

Stamford, St. Mary's Church, Dccccxxxii. 145.

Welsh Shepherd, Dccccxxxi. 65.

Wilton Church, Dccccxlvii. 361.

Wotton, Sir H., Dccccxlviii. 377.

Natural HistoryCrepis virens, Dccccxxix. 105.

Plane, Oriental, Dccccxlvi. 353.

Scandix pecten Veneris, Dccccxxxi. 137.

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LANCASTER is the county town of Lancashire, and is pleasantly situated on an eminence on the southern bank of the river Lune, at a distance of

240 miles N.N.W. from London.

mond, and a lofty and well-proportioned tower, erected in 1759, at the west end. The body of the church has two stories, both with battlements; and the walls, excepting those of the tower and registry court, which are modern buildings, are of rude grout. The interior is lofty; and the arches and pillars, which separate the nave from the sideaisles, extend nearly to the altar. The roof is of plain ribbed oak, with principals slightly orna

It seems probable this was a station (Ad Alau-
sam) of the Romans; and a variety of Roman
remains have from time to time been discovered
here. It has been subjected to great vicissitudes.
At the time of the conquest it had greatly de-mented.
clined: in 1322 and 1389 it was burnt by the

Scots: in the wars of York and Lancaster it was
depopulated, the inhabitants obstinately adhering
to the Lancastrian party; and in later years it
has suffered by fire. It is now, however, a pros-
perous and thriving town.
The streets in the older portions are narrow, but
the more modern parts are open and well built.
The church and the castle are the most prominent
octs in the place, and present an imposing
aspect to the traveller.

Galleries extend on the north-west and south sides. The arch of the chancel is high and pointed. The screen, anciently placed before the Hall. The stalls stretch along the breadth of the large and light east window, is now at Caponwray chancel, and contain a profusion of tracery, terminating in pointed heads. Along the east wall, on the north and south sides of the altar, are curious folding seats, twelve of which have distesque carvings, and the beautiful workmanship torted human figures, and foliage. These groin front of the chancel and vestry, have for many ages attracted the notice of the curious, and will

A church is supposed to have existed here, on The site occupied by the present parish church, in long continue to be admired as excellent speciDanish times, and possibly even earlier on mens of ancient art...... The windows in the after the conquest, this church, dedicated to St. aisles and clerestory are plain, and have the flatMary, was attached by Roger de Poictou to a tened arch of the fifteenth century. An arched Benedictine priory, which he founded here as a cavity in the south wall of the church is supposed cell to the abbey of St. Martin de Seez, in Nor to have been anciently a baptistry. mandy. Various charters afterwards confirmed "The sepulchral monuments in this church are and enlarged the possessions of this house. But, numerous..... A few years ago a small stone when the alien monasteries were suppressed in the cross, adorned with entangled scrolls, the usual reign of Henry V., this priory of Lancaster was characteristics of Danish crosses, was discovered given in trust to certain bishops and others as beneath the soil of the churchyard of St. Mary's. the abbey of Sion, in Middlesex, and continued as lines of Runic characters, which are tolerably disAn inscription appears upon this cross in three a cell dependent upon it till the dissolution. he present edifice is in the later style of Eng-tinct, but do not exactly coincide with any of the numerous varieties of alphabets published by Dr. after the transfer of the prior baby erected soon Hickes, the lexicographer. The height of the on the north-east side of the castle-hill, and is a cross is 3 feet; its breadth 1 foot 3 inches" *. commanding object, situated high above the town: enlarged by Roger de Poictou, and adapted for The church, about 143 feet long, 58 broad, and his residence; and in its present state it is used for high, consists of a centre or nave, two side-aisles and chancel, a vestry and registry court of the Lancashire portion of the archdeaconry of Rich

Jish architecture, and was probably

No, 922,

B

The castle is not far from the church. It was

the county courts.

* Baines' History of Lancashire, vol. iv.
VOL. XXXII.

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