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of authority and the management tools for effective control evaluation, planning, and audit.

(Author)

make better use of the time available, the CAA is now using a Ferranti digital simulator for training at London Airport. The simulator has two controller positions each equipped with a PPI (plan position indicator) and normal communications. A third PPI in an adjacent room serves the program controller who sits between two blip drivers. A maximum of 24 aircraft can be controlled at one time, but the system is capable of accepting data on up to 90 flights. The program controller can thus call up a steady flow of traffic, with outbounds, overfliers, light aircraft and helicopter traffic as well as the inbounds being controlled by his two students.

F.R.L.

A74-27520 # Alpha Jet · A German-French joint venture. S. Haller (Bundesamt für Wehrtechnik und Beschaffung, Koblenz, West Germany). Dornier-Post (English Edition), no. 1, 1974, p. 24-28.

The original Dornier Do P 375 project was concerned with the development of a two-seat, twin-jet trainer in response to the German Air Force's need for a jet aircraft for elementary and advanced training during the years from 1976 to 1980. Similar requirements on the part of the French Air Force led to the Alpha Jet TA 501 project undertaken jointly by the Federal Republic of Germany and France. Aspects of the concept phase of the project are discussed together with the definition phase, the execution of the program, and etails regarding the bilateral government organization involved.

G.R.

A74.27142

DCA's role in satellite communications. G. T. Gould, Jr. (USAF; U.S. Defense Communications Agency, Washing. ton, D.C.). Signal, vol. 28, Mar. 1974, p. 42-46.

Discussion of the key role that the Defense Communications Agency (DCA) is to play in the planning, system engineering, and management of future military communications satellite systems. The discussed DCA responsibilities and functions include the Military Satellite Communications (MILSATCOM) System Architect, the MILSATCOM System Office, Phases I and II of the Defense Satellite Communications System (DSCS) Project Management, the Washington-Moscow 'Hot Line', the Defense Communications Engineering Center (DCEC), the System Engineering Facility (SEF), the Defense Communications Engineering Office (DCEO), and the Satellite Simulation Facility. DCEC is shown to provide the technical expertise required to get a complex satellite communications system from the early concept stage to an operational facility. M.V.E.

A74-27634

HS. 146 progress report. A. Hofton. Flight International, vol. 105, Apr. 11, 1974, p. 457-462.

Because many operators will use the HS. 146 for stages with flight times of about one-half hour, particular attention has been paid to minimizing those costs which are related to the number of flight cycles rather than to flying hours. A target figure for direct maintenance costs has been established and techniques are being employed to monitor and control these costs throughout the design to the same extent as, for example, weight and manufacturing costs. Lycoming reports that test-rig and flight tests have shown that the ALF 502 fan engine has a high tolerance of inlet distortion, and during accelerations with accessory loads the engine is surge-free. The ALF 502 is built up from four basic modules that can be handled and serviced separately, and are interchangeable between engines.

F.R.L.

A74-27432 # Recent status on development of the turbofan engine in Japan. M. Matsuki, T. Torisaki (National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo, Japan), and K. Miyazawa (Ishikawajima Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Gas Turbine Conference and Products Show, Zurich, Switzerland, Mar. 30-Apr. 4, 1974, Paper 74-GT-39. 12 p. Members, $1.00; nonmembers, $3.00.

Efforts to design and develop new jet engines have been made in Japan since 1953. One family of propulsion engine (J3) succeeded in getting into production for installation on two models of Japanese developed aircraft (T1B and P2J). Another family of lift engine (JR) has been successfully used for overall VTOL system studies. Based upon these experiences, studies on a new fan engine for main propulsion are being carried out. This new engine (FJR-710) is a high bypass front fan engine developed for low noise generation and low smoke emission.

(Author)

A74-27804 # Compatibility planning for improved spectrum use. D. B. Colby (U.S. Navy, Naval Weapons Laboratory, Dahlgren, Va.). American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Communications Satellite Systems Conference, 5th, Los Angeles, Calif., Apr. 22-24, 1974, Paper 74-432. 7 p. 7 rets. Members, $1.50; nonmembers, $2.00.

In 1972, the Director of Telecommunications Policy issued Circular 11 which required assessment of spectrum availability prior to funding of Federal Government communication-electronics systems. An early, cooperative, multi-agency evaluation of advance information is applied, with special emphasis on space systems. Experience with this process in 1973 has demonstrated the desired early identification of potential compatibility problems, and helped in developing remedial options for telecommunications developments which will be important to the national economy and security in the future.

(Author)

A74-27490 # A discussion of effective management of scientific data processing in consideration of design. D. E. Barbeau (Teledyne, Inc., Teledyne CAE Div., Toledo, Ohio). American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Gas Turbine Conference and Products Show, Zurich, Switzerland, Mar. 30 Apr. 4, 1974, Paper 74-GT-151. 16 p. 20 refs. Members, $1.00; nonmembers, $3.00.

Consideration of the management of scientific data processing from a user's point of view. Specific areas considered critical to the user's operational effectiveness are discussed to illustrate approaches to the management system. Two major areas of consideration are programming and error analysis. These are examined in terms of analytic design requirements, which is most representative of the engineering computer functions. The premise is made that effective utilization of computer-related resource will come through effective management of scientific data processing operations. The means and requirements to accomplish this are discussed as they relate to the user operation. The primary areas of consideration are the allocation

A74-27834 # Long-range planning for telecommunications in a multinational environment. W. G. Gosewinckel (Overseas Telecommunications Commission, Sydney, Australia). American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Communications Satellite Systems Conference, 5th, Los Angeles, Calif., Apr. 22-24, 1974, Paper 74.490. 7 p. Members, $1.50; nonmembers, $2.00.

The growth and development of international telecommunica. tions services over the recent years is characterized by increasing demand for existing services, the emergence of many new services, and the need for progressive improvement of the availability and reliability of all services. Commercial communications satellites and submarine cable systems are expected to continue as the basic means of intercontinental telecommunications during the next twenty years, and it is viewed that their usage will be on a complementary rather than competitive basis. It is stressed that international organizations must jointly develop the necessary financing and planning machinery on a global basis to ensure that advanced technology is effectively exploited. The capabilities and activities of the Intelsat organization and of the British Commonwealth telecommunications organization in this area are delineated. T.M.

viable satellite communications network during the next two years. The new operations plan calls for start of communications services in July 1974 using leased satellite capacity. The second phase will be initiated in 1977 with the launch of the ASC satellites which will incorporate both 6/4 GHz and 14/12 GHz transponders. Aspects of system performance are considered together with the earth segment, the space segment, dedicated customer.site earth stations, and ASC future plans.

G.R.

A74-27835 # Philippine domestic satellite system. G. Cheadle (Philippine Overseas Telecommunications Corp., Washington, D.C.). American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Communications Satellite Systems Conference, 5th, Los Angeles, Calif., Apr. 22-24, 1974, Paper 74-491. 4 p. Members, $1.50; nonmembers, $2.00.

The Philippines needs to expand its domestic telecommunications capabilities and augment the amount and types of services provided. In particular, educational television is needed by the many schools in remote areas. It appears that a domestic satellite system would be the quickest and most economical solution. Three main questions are discussed: (1) what types of service at which locat ns should be provided; (2) what is the best overall technical, opera. tional, and economic approach; and (3) how can the project be financed.

(Author)

A74-28613

Design of a ground control system to operate domestic and maritime satellites. A. J. E. van Hover and W. J. Gribbin (COMSAT General Corp., Washington, D.C.). American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Communications Satellite Systems Conference, 5th, Los Angeles, Calif., Apr. 22-24, 1974, Paper 74-483.9 p. Members, $1.50; nonmembers, $2.00.

An integrated and automated Tracking, Telemetry and Com. mand (TT&C) Ground System was designed for the Comsat General Domestic and Maritime Satellite Systems. The TT&C earth stations, processing equipment, System Control Center, computer facilities and communication links are described as well as the system design criteria. Tradeoffs of manning versus automation, capital versus operating costs and innovation versus use of known technology are analyzed. General telemetry data management and reduction philosophies are addressed.

(Author)

A74-28501 # Management problems in European projects with regard to the geographical distribution of tasks. H. Tolle (ERNO Raumfahrttechnik GmbH, Bremen, West Germany). (British Interplanetary Society, European Space Symposium on International Collaboration in Space, 13th, London, England, June 25-27, 1973.) British Interplanetary Society, Journal, vol. 27, May 1974, p. 321-327.

The paper reviews the problems introduced into European space projects by the requirement for a geographical distribution of work in agreement with the funding of the project through the European nations involved. It recommends on the basis of some examples a flexible and generous handling of geographical distribution boundaries and an early commitment of the European countries in the case of new projects.

(Author)

A74-28675 # One of a kind spacecraft designed to a cost. E. Offenhartz (Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, N.Y.). Defense Management Journal, vol. 10. Apr. 1974, p. 24-28.

The program considered is concerned with the achievement of maximum performance for a fixed development cost. A typical spacecraft cost distribution and breakout is shown. The system development approach employed uses a disciplined multiskilled team to translate customer mission and functional requirement into configuration definitions. Relations with the suppliers are discussed together with questions of budget control and customer influence.

G.R.

A74-28572

State versus federal regulation of commercial aeronautics. R. F. Maris. Journal of Air Law and Commerce, vol. 39, Autumn 1973, p. 521-557. 215 refs.

Current federal legislation in the field of air law is dominated by the Federal Aviation Act of 1958. The primary stimulus for its enactment was the undesirable state into which the quality of safety regulation of aeronautics had fallen. Since Congress has the constitutional right to regulate all interstate commerce, and since the aeronautics industry is essentially interstate, it is natural that an area of contention would be whether air safety, and now recently, environmental protection, are so intertwined with the commercial aspect of air transportation as to preclude any state regulation in these areas. In addition, federal domination of the area of airspace control is not matched by control in the economic realm. Rather, it seems that the intent of Congress has been to allow a certain degree of concurrent state authority, which has generated a tremendous amount of uncertainty and litigation since no consistent pattern of federal-state regulation has been articulated. The present work maintains that the distinction between rates and certification, on the one hand, and routes and services on the other, is illogical and should be ended.

P.T.H.

A74-28726

The national microwave landing system /MLS/. J. W. Edwards (FAA, Microwave Landing System Div.). Society of Automotive Engineers, Business Aircraft Meeting, Wichita, Kan., Apr. 2-5, 1974, Paper 740345. 9 p. Members, $1.25; nonmembers, $2.00.

The microwave landing system (MLS) is being developed as the next generation approach and landing system to replace the present worldwide instrument landing system (ILS). In order to satisfy diverse users such as civil and military aviation and conventional and V/STOL aircraft, the MLS employs compatible modular configura. tions. The five-year National MLS Development Program, half over, has just completed a hardware feasibility demonstration phase, is about to choose the best technique, either scanning beam or Doppler scan, and in the next phase will select a single national system from among competing contractors. Operational advantages provided by the MLS include far greater flying precision and flexibility, including curved or segmented approaches in three dimensions; and flare guidance for all-weather automatic landing capability, resulting in greater safety while increasing airport capacities.

(Author)

A74-28612# The American satellite communications system. S. Ashton and D. Silverman (American Satellite Corp., Germantown, Md.). American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Communications Satellite Systems Conference, 5th, Los Angeles, Calif., Apr. 22-24, 1974, Paper 74-482. 8 p. Members, $1.50; nonmembers, $2.00.

The American Satellite Corporation (ASC) plans to build a

A74-28738

The background to propeller airplane noise regulations. E. W. Sellman (FAA, Office of Environmental Quality. Oklahoma City, Okla.). Society of Automotive Engineers, Business Aircraft Meeting, Wichita, Kan., Apr. 2-5, 1974, Paper 740361. 8 p. 6 rets. Members, $1.25; nonmembers, $2.00.

Outline of the development of noise standards applicable to light, propeller-driven aircraft. The new noise abatement standards required under the Noise Control Act of 1972 are discussed in regard of authority and the management tools for effective control evaluation, planning, and audit.

(Author)

make better use of the time available, the CAA is now using a Ferranti digital simulator for training at London Airport. The simulator has two controller positions each equipped with a PPI (plan position indicator) and normal communications. A third PPI in an adjacent room serves the program controller who sits between two blip drivers. A maximum of 24 aircraft can be controlled at one time, but the system is capable of accepting data on up to 90 flights. The program controller can thus call up a steady flow of traffic, with outbounds, overfliers, light aircraft and helicopter traffic as well as the inbounds being controlled by his two students.

F.R.L.

A74-27520 # Alpha Jet · A German-French joint venture. S. Haller (Bundesamt für Wahrtechnik und Beschaffung, Koblenz, West Germany). Dornier-Post (English Edition), no. 1, 1974, p. 24-28.

The original Dornier Do P 375 project was concerned with the development of a two-seat, twin-jet trainer in response to the German Air Force's need for a jet aircraft for elementary and advanced training during the years from 1976 to 1980. Similar requirements on the part of the French Air Force led to the Alpha Jet TA 501 project undertaken jointly by the Federal Republic of Germany and France. Aspects of the concept phase of the project are discussed together with the definition phase, the execution of the program, and details regarding the bilateral government organization involved.

G.R.

A74-27142

DCA's role in satellite communications. G. T. Gould, Jr. (USAF; U.S. Defense Communications Agency, Washing. ton, D.C.). Signal, vol. 28, Mar. 1974, p. 42-46.

Discussion of the key role that the Defense Communications Agency (DCA) is to play in the planning, system engineering, and management of future military communications satellite systems. The discussed DCA responsibilities and functions include the Military Satellite Communications (MILSATCOM) System Architect, the MILSATCOM System Office, Phases I and Il of the Defense Satellite Communications System (DSCS) Project Management, the Washington-Moscow 'Hot Line', the Defense Communications Engineering Center (DCEC), the System Engineering Facility (SEF), the Defense Communications Engineering Office (DCEO), and the Satellite Simulation Facility. DCEC is shown to provide the technical expertise required to get a complex satellite communications system from the early concept stage to an operational facility. M.V.E.

A74-27634

HS. 146 progress report. A. Hofton. Flight International, vol. 105, Apr. 11, 1974, p. 457-462.

Because many operators will use the HS. 146 for stages with flight times of about one-half hour, particular attention has been paid to minimizing those costs which are related to the number of flight cycles rather than to flying hours. A target figure for direct maintenance costs has been established and techniques are being employed to monitor and control these costs throughout the design to the same extent as, for example, weight and manufacturing costs. Lycoming reports that test-rig and flight tests have shown that the ALF 502 fan engine has a high tolerance of inlet distortion, and during accelerations with accessory loads the engine is surge-free. The ALF 502 is built up from four basic modules that can be handled and serviced separately, and are interchangeable between engines.

F.R.L.

A74-27432 # Recent status on development of the turbofan engine in Japan. M. Matsuki, T. Torisaki (National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo, Japan), and K. Miyazawa (Ishikawajima Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Gas Turbine Conference and Products Show, Zurich, Switzerland, Mar. 30-Apr. 4, 1974, Paper 74-GT-39. 12 p. Members, $1.00; nonmembers, $3.00.

Efforts to design and develop new jet engines have been made in Japan since 1953. One family of propulsion engine (J3) succeeded in getting into production for installation on two models of Japanese developed aircraft (T1B and P2J). Another family of lift engine (JR) has been successfully used for overall VTOL system studies. Based upon these experiences, studies on a new fan engine for main propulsion are being carried out. This new engine (FJR-710) is a high bypass front fan engine developed for low noise generation and low smoke emission.

(Author)

A74-27804 # Compatibility planning for improved spectrum use. D. B. Colby (U.S. Navy, Naval Weapons Laboratory, Dahlgren, Va.). American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Communications Satellite Systems Conference, 5th, Los Angeles, Calif., Apr. 22-24, 1974, Paper 74-432. 7 p. 7 refs. Members, $1.50; nonmembers, $2.00.

In 1972, the Director of Telecommunications Policy issued Circular 11 which required assessment of spectrum availability prior to funding of Federal Government communication-electronics sys tems. An early, cooperative, multi-agency evaluation of advance information is applied, with special emphasis on space systems. Experience with this process in 1973 has demonstrated the desired early identification of potential compatibility problems, and helped in developing remedial options for telecommunications developments which will be important to the national economy and security in the future.

(Author)

A74-27490 # A discussion of effective management of scientific data processing in consideration of design. D. E. Barbeau (Teledyne, Inc., Teledyne CAE Div., Toledo, Ohio). American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Gas Turbine Conference and Products Show, Zurich, Switzerland, Mar. 30 Apr. 4, 1974, Paper 74-GT-151. 16 p. 20 refs. Members, $1.00; nonmembers, $3.00.

Consideration of the management of scientific data processing from a user's point of view. Specific areas considered critical to the user's operational effectiveness are discussed to illustrate approaches to the management system. Two major areas of consideration are programming and error analysis. These are examined in terms of analytic design requirements, which is most representative of the engineering computer functions. The premise is made that effective utilization of computer-related resource will come through effective management of scientific data-processing operations. The means and requirements to accomplish this are discussed as they relate to the user operation. The primary areas of consideration are the allocation

A74-27834 # Long-range planning for telecommunication
in a multinational environment. W. G. Gosewinckel (Over
Telecommunications Commission, Sydney, Australia). Am
Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Communication:
Systems Conference, 5th, Los Angeles, Calif., Apr. 23
Paper 74-490. 7 p. Members, $1.50; nonmembe - on:

The growth and development of interna
tions services over the recent years is chi
demand for existing services, the emerger
and the need for progressive improver
reliability of all services. Commercial
submarine cable systems are expecter
of intercontinental telecommunic:
years, and it is viewed that their
rather than competitive basis

1972.

San Francisco, San Francisco Press, Inc., 1974, p. 148-155.

Domestic and international NASA technology utilization experiences are described together with prospects for applying technology to problems of local and state governments. Transfer mechanisms used by NASA to introduce new technology in both the private and public sectors of the domestic scene are discussed, and attention is given to experiences gained in a pilot program designed to establish a refined methodology for the transfer of aerospacedeveloped technology to developing nations. Technical assistance to local and state governments involves applications of NASA experiences to further the constructive involvement of industry.

T.M.

Dayton, Ohio). IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, vol. PC-17, Mar. 1974, p. 1-8. 8 rets. Contract No. F33615-71-C-1069.

Review of the results of an experimental program that was designed to test the effect of using various sources of index terms on retrieval effectiveness and costs and to provide quantitative data as a basis for a management decision on optimal indexing procedures for an information storage and retrieval system. The results include the finding that indexing efficiency is greatest when title and abstract are used as sources of index terms.

M.V.E.

A74.30119

Transfer of commercial technology. G. R. White (Xerox Corp., Stamford, Conn.). In: Technology transfer: Successes and failures; Proceedings of the Conference, Seattle, Wash., November 28-30, 1972.

San Francisco, San Francisco Press, Inc., 1974, p. 194-207.

Description of prevailing circumstances and utilized techniques in several specific cases of commercial technology transfer between corporations, from government to corporation, from technical institute to corporation, and from university to corporation. Each of these cases is analyzed to draw general guidelines on the responsibili. ties of commercial enterprises, the government, technical institutes, and universities as efficient components of a technology development and distribution system.

T.M.

A74-30942

Organizing an ? & Doriented computer activity - Management and control of an Independent Research & Development Program. I. M. Datz. Angewandte Informatik, May 1974, p. 209-218.

An analysis of the effectiveness of a research and development program is discussed, giving attention to the problems associated with management and control activities. The establishment is considered of tools and criteria which will provide management with quantitative guidelines as an aid for the maintenance of conditions conducive to creative thought and innovation.

G.R.

A74-31274

Major advances expected from ATS-F. C. Covault. Aviation Week and Space Technology, vol. 100, May 27, 1974, p. 38.42.

Major technology innovations for communications spacecraft on board the ATS-F include passive thermal control, graphite composite materials usage, offset pointing capability, and attitude control innovations. The spacecraft's design consists of five major structural elements, including an environmental measurement package, solar arrays, the reflector, the support truss, and an earth viewing module. The ATS-F experiments are considered.

G.R.

A74-30353# Federal aviation requirements for future air navigation improvements. A. B. Winick (FAA, Washington, D.C.). In: National Radio Navigation Symposium, Washington, D.C., November 13.15, 1973, Proceedings.

Washington, D.C., Institute of Navigation, 1974, p. 13-17. 6 refs.

Aviation requirements for long distance navigation aids are based on the need to assure safe separation in high traffic density portions of the airspace. In domestic areas, a growing need appears to exist for a supplement to the standard short distance navigation system. A worldwide ground reference aid appears desirable as an adjunct to self-contained systems, and primary device in other cases. Accuracy requirements are not extreme; reliability and suitability for cockpit operation have equal importance. The goal of a single ground-based system appears feasible, if agreement can be reached on common requirements and sufficient time is planned for an orderly transition.

(Author)

A74-31339

Variables sampling and MIL-STD-414. E. G. Schilling (General Electric Co., Lamp Business Div., Cleveland, Ohio). Quality Progress, vol. 7, May 1974, p. 16-20.

The principal advantage of variables plans over attributes is reduction in sample size. Probably the most important consideration in applying variables sampling plans is the requirement that the shape of the underlying distribution of measurements to which the plan is to be applied must be known and stable. This means that statistical tests on past data must show that the distribution of measurements involved actually is that assumed by the plan. Control chart evidence also is desirable to indicate its stability. Military Standard 414 is an acceptable quality level (AQL) type sampling scheme that assumes underlying normality of distribution of the measurements to which it is applied. Since it is an AQL plan, it incorporates switching rules to move from normal to tightened or reduced inspection and return.

F.R.L.

A74-30358 # Economical usage of long range navigation. W. K. Vogeler (Telcom, Inc., McLean, Va.). In: National Radio Navigation Symposium, Washington, D.C., November 13.15, 1973, Proceedings

Washington, D.C., Institute of Navigation, 1974, p. 63.70. 5 refs.

A description of the operational requirements and economic factors which confront the low-cost user of long range navigation/ positioning systems serves as an introduction to the comparison of satellite, Omega, Decca, and Loran-C usage in the non-military area. Three categories of users are described: the direct user who desires to know his location, the analytic user who desires a documented record of his unit's track, and the controller who desires the location of other units. The four systems are then compared with respect to those considerations which are of importance from the user's viewpoint. Loran-C is selected as the system which best meets the user requirements. The manner in which Loran-C can be utilized with a description of industrial and governmental tasks concludes the paper.

(Author)

A74-31446

Energy self-sufficiency · An economic evaluation. M. A. Adelman, H. D. Jacoby, P. L. Joskow, P. W. MacAvoy, D. C. White, M. B. Zimmerman (MIT, Cambridge, Mass.), and H. P. Meissner. Technology Review, vol. 76, May 1974, p. 22-58. Research sponsored by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

On the assumption that the U.S. meets all its energy demands from internal sources by 1980, forecasts are made of the prices at which supply and demand will be in equilibrium. The results indicate that prices in the range from $10.00 to $12.00 per barrel (oil-equivalent) will be necessary to bring forth enough additional supplies of fossil fuels to satisfy demands in domestic energy markets by that time. The development of special price policies is recom. mended for the synthetics industry. Security can be provided against import disruption by the introduction of radically new import policies. One important element would be an import storage program.

G.R.

A74-30416

The significance of titles, abstracts, and other portions of technical documents for information retrieval. F. L. Scheffler, H. H. Schumacher, and J. F. March (Dayton, University,

A7432319 # DOD's Space Test Program. F. A. Pacarozzi and N T. Anderson (USAF, Directorate of Spae, Washington, D.C.). Astronautics and Aeronautics, vol 12, June 1974, p. 42-47,

The Department of Defense Sose Test Program provides promot spaceflight support to developmental, preoperational, and research payloads. The program has encompassed 56 payloads on 18 different spacecraft missions, and another 31 payloads have been assigned to missions not yet flown. Although the Au Force is the executive agency, the management procedures for the program are outlined in a joint Army, Navy, and Air Force manual. Payloads may be submitted by any one of dozens of laboratories and program offices, while the Space Test Program selects the payloads and sets their priority. The general steps involved in the cost analysis of a given payload are outlined,

P.LH.

The Practical System for Cataloging, Indexing, and Retrieval of Remote Sensing Data developed by the Interdisciplinary Remote Sensing Group at the Unwersity of Wisconsin consists of a card catalog, a site-inder mao, a site-index-file, an industry-index-file, and a project-index-file. The system is designed for retrieval of remotesensing data which include imagery, magnetic tapes, flight logs, maps, ground-truth reports, and research reports containing raw data. It can be operated by conventional library methods, but provision has been made for digitizing the systern for computer retrieval.

P.T.H.

A74-32320 * " Mariner Venus/Mercury '73 - A strategy of cost control. A Biggs (NASA, Office of Space Science and Applications, Washington, DC.) and W J. Downhower (California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif ) Astronautics and Aeronautics, vol. 12, June 1974, p. 48-53.

The Mariner Venus/Mercury '73 project kept within its originally established goals for schedule, performance, and cost. Underlying this development success was the availability of the Mariner technology. But meeting the goals dernanded management determination, planning, and discipline to make optimum use of state-of. the art technology The present work points out management approaches and techniques that kept schedules and controlled costs, the intent being to stimulate thought about how to do the same with future spacecraft and payloads,

P.LH

A7433298 A proposed pricing procedure for domestic airlines. C. K Walter (Nebraska, University, Lincoln, Neb.). Journal of Air Law and Commerce, vol. 40, Winter 1974, p. 61-74. 34 refs.

A tariff construction system for domestic airlines is proposed which it is argued is equitable to both passengers and airlines, logical, and programable for computation. The basis for determining fares would be the distance from origin airport to destination airport. A table of all commercial airports, their latitudes and longitudes, and some basic formulas would constitute sufficient information to determine the distance between any airport pair. The class of service would also be considered. This linear pricing system is simple, although possible arguments against it are also brought forward.

P.T.H.

A74-33299

An analysis of the national transportation policy. S. D. Browne (MIT, Cambridge, Mass.). (Annual Air Law Symposium, 8th, Dallas, Tex., Mar, 14, 1974.) Journal of Air Law and Commerce, vol. 40, Winter 1974, p. 75-79.

The present work advocates greater central control of national transportation policy making, and states that Congress must address the problem of an all-mode transportation department with power to allocate resources between the modes. It is also pointed out that recent data concerning the fuel efficiency of various modes of transportation are out of line. It is argued that these data, obtained by dividing total passenger miles by total fuel, reflected badly on air transportation without taking into consideration actual trip distances, infrastructure costs, and time considerations. P.I.H.

A74-32321 # Ground testing and simulation. I · Key to efficient development of aerospace systems, J. D. Whitfield (ARO, Inc, von Karman Gas Dynamics Facility, Arnold Air Force Station, Tenn ), Astronautics and Aeronautics, vol. 12, June 1974, p. 54, 55. 6 rets,

Future developments of aerospace systems can be carried out faster, safer, and at a lower cost through more complete and earlier ground testing and simulation. This requires a change in present development philosophies as well as the availability of more advanced facilities, such as high Reynolds number transonic tunnels, large full scale subsonic tunnels, and propulsion facilities for testing very large turbine engines

(Author)

A74-32733

European space activities since the war - А personal view. A. V. Cleaver. (British Interplanetary Society, Meeting, London, Mar, 8, 1974.) Spaceflight, vol, 16, June 1974, p. 220-238

If European collaboration is to be meaningful, an attempt must be made to subordinate national interests to the common aim. Long-term objectives must always be borne in mind, basic decisions can rarely be taken as a result of short-term cost benefit analyses. Effective European collaboration is impracticable unless better political continuity can be assumed, with fewer changes of policy. delays in decision

making, and cycles of 'stop-go' decisions. Perhaps the only possible solution to the problem would be for European ministers to confine their own powers to laying down certain very broad but form guidelines, thereafter leaving the implementation of such policies to the professionals within agencies and industry.

F.R.L.

A74-33300 Dynamics and forecasts of R & D funding. C. E. Falk (National Science Foundation, Div. of Science Resources Studies, Washington, D.C.), Technological Forecasting and Social Change, vol. 6, no. 2, 1974, p. 171-189, 21 refs.

The relationships between U.S. R & D funding and other macroparameters are analyzed on an overall national basis and within the four major sectors of the economy. The study concentrates on the dynamics of the two largest funding sources, government and industry, which are examined at decreasing levels of aggregation. Various numerical relationships are demonstrated and explanations of observed dynamical interactions are presented. The effects of the introduction of new areas of R&D interest are investigated. Funding patterns are shown to reflect an inherent stability of R & D operations, as illustrated by lack of good, short-term correlations between R & D funding and cyclical variants such as profits in industry or science and engineering graduate enrollments in institutions of higher education. The analyses and evolved numerical relationships are utilized to develop sectoral and national R & D expenditure projections for the year 1980.

(Author)

A74.33072

A catalog system for remote-sensing data. R. S. Singh and J. P. Scherz (Wisconsin, University, Madison, Wis.). Photogrammetric Engineering, vol. 40, June 1974, p. 709.720. 8 refs. Grant No. NGL-50-002-127.

A74-33612 # Space law and international action. E. Brooks. In: Colloquium on the Law of Outer Space, 15th, Vienna, Austria, October 8.15, 1972, Proceedings.

Davis, Calif., University of California; South Hackensack, N.J., Fred B. Rothman and Co., 1973, p. 188-196. 24 refs.

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