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projects, such as the MRCA (multirole crit aircraft) and the A-300 8 airbus. Approaches regarding the U.S. response to these developments are discussed, giving attention to the basic economics that must be considered in developing a successful long-term strategy for profitable operations.

G.R.

Cost is becoming an increasingly important consideration in the selection of new weapon systems. Reducing the ownership costs of future military aircraft engines will require: (1) establishing minimum acceptable airplane performance requirements, and (2) selecting the engine technology level and configuration which achieve these ormance goals at the lowest life-cycle cost. Jet engines are exam :d from a cost and performance viewpoint and their cost relationship to airplane mission needs developed. Several hypothetical aircraft are studied to show the influence that cost considerations may have on future engine design trends. (Author)

A74-11776

AMST · The approach to the STOL transport of the US (AMST · Der Weg zum STOL-Transporter der USA). N. Lynn. Flug Revue/Flugwelt International, Nov. 1973, p. 20-25. In German.

The Advanced Medium STOL Transport (AMST) program is to develop an aircraft which can be used to replace the Lockheed C-130 Hercules of the USAF. Each of two U.S. aerospace firms is to design and manufacture two AMST prototypes. New advanced technological methods are to be used to obtain an economical STOL transport design. The various intended military objectives for the new aircraft are discussed together with the major design specifications of the AMST and the individual characteristics of each of the two prototype versions. It is planned to develop also commercial AMST derivatives for civil aviation, including a model for 100 and a model for 180 passengers.

G.R.

A74-13299# Status of state air emission regulations affecting gas turbines. N. R. Dibelius and R. J. Ketterer (General Electric Co., Gas Turbine Div., Schenectady, N.Y.). American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Winter Annual Meeting, Detroit, Mich., Nov. 11-15, 1973, Paper 73-WA/GT-8. 13 p. Members, $1.00; nonmembers, $3.00.

A summary of the state regulations as of May 30, 1973, covering air pollution emissions from stationary gas turbines. The summary includes a tabulation of allawable emission for the 50 states, 2 territories, and the District of Columbia for particulates, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and visible emission. The tabulation presents a useful quick reference to the overall situation as of June, 1973, even though extensive changes to these regulations may be forthcoming

V.Z.

A7412440

Criteria for evaluating the economic expediency of multinational integrated production (Criteri per la valutazione della convenienza economica della produzione integrata multinazionale). G. B. Nicolo (Napoli, Università, Naples, Italy). L'Aerotecnica · Missili e Spazio, vol. 52, June 1973, p. 199-204. In Italian.

Use of simple key parameters to characterize an international program of aircraft production under consideration with respect to a program carried out exclusively on national bases for the purpose of satisfying the same need. It is shown that the limits of economic expediency of the multinational program relative to the national program can be easily determined as a function of these characteristic parameters with the aid of diagrams derived from simple analytical relations. It is concluded that the minimum number of aircraft to be added to the national requirement in order to achieve the expediency of multinational operation decreases as the complexity of the aircraft increases and the percentage increase in the development and production costs due to multinationality decreases.

A.B.K.

A74-13313

Aviation psychological research. Edited by J. D. Anderson. Brussels, Western-European Association for AviationPsychology, 1973. 103 p. In English, French, and German. $5.40.

The human factor in flight safety is discussed together with the perceptual defense organization as predictor of the pilot's adaptive behavior in military flying, the personality variables of airline pilots, and flight simulator research at the Royal Air Force Institute of Aviation Medicine. Other topics explored include student and instructor attitude to the simulator, the quantitative evaluation of aircraft flight simulators, the selection of fighter controllers, and aspects of management training in an international airline.

G.R.

A7412819* # Space Tug - Mission and program planning. J. W. Wild and P. E. Cuibertson (NASA, Washington, D.C.). International Astronautical Federation, International Astronautical Congress, 24th, Baku, Azerbaidzhan SSR, Oct. 7-13, 1973, Paper. 20 p.

An additional propulsive stage, carried in the payload bay, will be necessary for delivery of payloads to orbits beyond those which can be reached by the Shuttle alone. The concept of a reusable third stage, or Space Tug, has been under study for several years. Aspects of space tug operations planning are discussed together with payload studies, shuttle third stage program options, expendable stage studies, growth stage studies, and engine studies. Studies concerning reusable space tugs are considered, giving attention to a minimum development cost tug, a direct developed tug for 1983 operational capability, and a phased developed tug. Payload requirements are examined along with shuttle interface requirements, ground operations, and program options.

G.R.

A74-13814

Technical management techniques for large scale automatic test systems engineering. S. N. Mullin (LockheedCalifornia Co., Burbank, Calif.). In: Automatic support systems for advanced maintainability; International Symposium, Arlington, Tex., November 5-7, 1973, Record.

New York, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., 1973, p. 113-122. 9 refs.

Large scale automatic test systems (ATS) are defined and potential technical management problem areas are outlined. Critical technical management objectives for ATS projects are listed. Technical management techniques useful in the following areas are discussed: organization, supervisory and technical staffing, establishment of technical, schedule, and cost objectives, product technical quality assurance, and project control. An annotated bibliography is included as well as an appendix containing twenty-five widely believed myths of ATS engineering and management. The point of view reflected throughout the paper is that ATS technology has moved from an adolescent to a mature art rather recently and that similarly mature ATS management techniques have been evolved but are not being vigorously and consistently applied.

(Author)

A74-12922# Cost impact of mission requirements on future engine design selection. R. B. Dyson and W. J. Olsson (United Aircraft Corp., Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Div., East Hartford, Conn.). American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Society of Automotive Engineers, Propulsion Conference, 9th, Las Vegas, Nev., Nov. 5-7, 1973, AIAA Paper 73-1186. 6 p. Members, $1.50; non members, $2.00.

A7413976 # Improving aircraft productivity - We all have a part of the action. C. S. Glasgow (Douglas Aircraft Co., Long Beach, Calif.). Air Transport Association of America, Engineering and Maintenance Conference, Miami, Fla., Oct. 10-12, 1973, Paper. 15 p. Aircraft productivity is a function of utilization, speed, passenger capacity, load factor, and service life. In order to expedite the solution to delays and high maintenance problems Douglas appointed 'problem managers,' each responsible for elimination of a specific problem. In carrying out their responsibilities the problem managers made observations that clearly illustrate that increasing aircraft productivity involves manufacturers, equipment vendors, and the airlines. Some additional means of improving productivity are outlined, e.g., use of optimum flap setting on takeoff, and operating at the aft center of gravity limit.

F.R.L.

The history of European air transport is considered, giving attention to conditions at the beginning of air traffic, questions of aircraft development, predictions concerning future developments, and the liberalization of European air transport, Airline objectives are related to the customer, national aspects, and questions of profitability. Problems of airline creative marketing are discussed together with the significance of airport location, taking into account aircraft movement trends at Heathrow airport.

G.R.

A74-13977 # Make no mistake about it Air transport productivity demands a total and dedicated 'team effort.' J. F. Sutter (Boeing Commercial Airplane Co., Renton, Wash.). Air Transport Association of America, Engineering and Maintenance Conference, Miami, Fla., Oct 10-12, 1973, Paper. 8 p.

It is pointed out that the modern fleet of wide body jet transports can be even more productive by a team effort on the part of the airlines, the FAA, and the manufacturers. Since mid-1971, 36 features have been incorporated in new production aircraft to make the Boeing 747 more productive. An agressive program has been adopted to recognize and develop improvements for in-service problems. A number of details are provided concerning the program to reduce maintenance costs on the 747.

G.R.

A74-14512

Maplin · Management aspects. P. Whitford (British Airports Authority, London, England). In: Airports for the 80s; Proceedings of the Fourth World Airports Conference, London, England, April 3-5, 1973.

London, Institution of Civil Engineers, 1973, p. 125-129.

Managing in the 80s a new airport like Maplin will present a different challenge from that which faced the first managers of existing airports. Both the size and the technological content will be different. Objectives and management styles must be carefully chosen and defined, and the airport manager must ensure that the whole airport system gives a high level of passenger service. To do this he must know what the passenger really wants, not what he thinks the passenger wants. It will be difficult to permit large numbers of individual, autonomous organizations to operate in parallel without adversely affecting the level of passenger service. A large degree of automation throughout the whole airport system will be necessary if the maximum planned capacity, approximately 125 million passengers per annum, is to be achieved.

(Author)

A74-14104 * Experimental payloads · Inception to integra-
tion. M. Bader (NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.).
In: Space Shuttle payloads; Proceedings of the Symposium,
Washington, D.C., December 27, 28, 1972.
Tarzana, Calif., American Astronautical Society, 1973, p. 45-53.

Space payload management concepts previously outlined (Bader and Farlow, 1971) are reviewed and are extended to include the aircraft research management scheme. The application of this scheme to the Space Shuttle, both as an orbiting laboratory and as a launch vehicle for unmanned spacecraft is discussed. It is shown that low-cost short-lead-time procedures, based on experience with the use of ordinary laboratory equipment aboard aircraft, are for the most part directly transferable to the Space Shuttle.

V.P.

A74-14515

Economic consequences of airport development. N. Lichfield. In: Airports for the 80s; Proceedings of the Fourth World Airports Conference, London, England, April 3-5, 1973.

London, Institution of Civil Engineers, 1973, p. 155-161. 19 refs.

The economic impacts of airport development are so widespread that under this title many different papers could be written. Some selection of topics is thus necessary. Employment in airports, the urban development required for the regular employees and the advantages and disadvantages of airports in economic terms are the themes followed and developed in this paper, in broad terms, after a preliminary discussion of the overall economic framework in which they will be placed. By way of illustration, references are made to the recent major studies for the siting of the third London airport.

(Author)

A74-14132

MLS program - Phase II. J. W. Edwards (FAA, Microwave Landing System Branch, Washington, D.C.). In: Western Electronic Show and Convention, San Francisco, Calif., September 11-14, 1973, Proceedings.

North Hollywood, Calif., Western Periodicals Co., 1973, p. 24/1-1 to 24/1-9.

Phase II of the national plan for development of a microwave landing system (MLS) is intended for the acquisition of appropriate data and information to support the selection of the best equipment and technique (scanning beam or Doppler scanning). Four contractor teams are presently developing and fabricating hardware that will be tested to evaluate compliance with a specified range of operational requirements. The main features of equipment to be developed by each of the four contractors are delineated, and the anticipated test program is described in terms of the envisioned factory, static-field, and flight tests.

T.M.

A74.15045 # Transport aerospace industry contributions to modern problem solutions /W. Rupert Turnbull Lecture for 1973/. J. E. Steiner (Boeing Commercial Airplane Co., Renton, Wash.). (Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute, Annual General Meeting, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, May 14, 1973.) Canadian Aeronautics and Space Journal, vol. 19, Oct. 1973, p. 388-403.

The significance of air transportation in Canada is briefly examined. Economic trends for the period from 1965 to 1985 are discussed, giving attention to a number of countries of different levels of economic development. Questions concerning the stimulation of the economy provided by tourism are considered together with aspects of the world commercial jet transport market, details regarding the pressures and constraints of transportation, program management tools, the cost management cycle, trends of aircraft production cost, airspace control problems, runway acceptance rate, and the growth in U.S. gross national product.

G.R.

A74-14309

Relating factory test failure results to field reliability, required field maintenance, and to total life cycle costs. C. M. Ryerson (Hughes Aircraft Co., Culver City, Calif.). (U.S. Air Force Academy Military Operations Research Symposium, 29th, Colorado Springs, Colo., June 27-29, 1972.) Microelectronics and Reliability, vol. 12, Oct. 1973, p. 357-384.

A74-14507

Changes in the European air transport pattern. C. Stuart (British European Airways Corp., Ruislip, Middx., England). In: Airports for the 80s; Proceedings of the Fourth World Airports Conference, London, England, April 3-5, 1973.

London, Institution of Civil Engineers, 1973, p. 65-72.

A74-16103

Skylab checkout operations. K. P. Timmons (Martin Marietta Aerospace, Kennedy Space Center, Fla.). In: Technology today and tomorrow; Proceedings of the Tenth Space Congress, Cocoa Beach, Fla., April 11-13, 1973.

affecting the selection of a management information system for the Shuttle will be analyzed and discussed.

(Author)

Cape Canaveral, Fla., Canaveral Council of Technical Societies, 1973, p. 1-9 to 1-12.

The Skylab Program at Kennedy Space Center presented many opportunities for interesting and profound test and checkout experience. It also offered a compilation of challenges and promises for the Center and for the contractors responsible for the various modules making up Skylab. It is very probable that the various contractors had common experiences during the module and combined systems tests, but this paper will discuss those experiences from the viewpoint of the Multiple Docking Adapter contractor. The experience will consider personnel, procedures, and hardware.

(Author)

A74-16117

Space Test Program. N. T. Anderson (USAF, Space and Missile Systems Organization, Los Angeles, Calif.). In: Technology today and tomorrow; Proceedings of the Tenth Space Congress, Cocoa Beach, Fla., April 11-13, 1973. Cape Canaveral, Fla., Canaveral Council of Technical Societies, 1973, p. 6-1 to 6-17.

The Department of Defense Space Test Program is a unique organization dedicated to stimulating space-related technology by providing launch and orbital support for research and development payloads. This paper delineates program management techniques, past accomplishments, and c:rrent activities. The benefit to the DOD is discussed.

(Author)

A74-16104

The Skylab Student Project. H. B. Floyd (NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.). In: Technology today and tomorrow; Proceedings of the Tenth Space Congress, Cocoa Beach, Fla., April 11-13, 1973. Cape Canaveral, Fla., Canaveral Council of Technical Societies, 1973, p. 1-13 to 1-28.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Science Teachers' Association (NSTA) undertook in 1971 a cooperative effort which brought high school students of the Nation into the mainstream of Skylab research through the Skylab Student Project. This paper presents the background, objectives and scope of the project, experiment selection procedures, as well as experiment descriptions and status. The paper includes observations on student caliber and inclinations and implications of some developments for the benefit of future researchers. (Author)

A74.16124

NASA's International Satellite Projects IA technical overview/. G. W. Ousley. In: Technology today and tomorrow; Proceedings of the Tenth Space Congress, Cocoa Beach, Fla., April 11-13, 1973.

Cape Canaveral, Fla., Canaveral Council of Technical Societies, 1973, p. 7-27 to 7-31.

Discussion of the project management responsibility assigned to the Goddard Space Flight Center for 17 international cooperative satellites previously launched, and five such satellites presently under development. The basic NASA ground rules, guidelines, and practices associated with the establishment and conduct of the NASA International Cooperative Project are reviewed.

M.V.E.

A74-16107

The Symphonie project organization. G. Mösl. In: Technology today and tomorrow; Proceedings of the Tenth Space Congress, Cocoa Beach, Fla., April 11-13, 1973.

Cape Canaveral, Fla., Canaveral Council of Technical Societies, 1973, p. 3-7 to 3-16.

Symphonie is a Franco-German project for the planning, construction, launching, and utilization of an experimental telecommunication satellite. In this lecture, the governmental and contractor organizations are presented as well as the project experiences discussed.

(Author)

A74-16445

Manufacturing exercise involved in the redesign of the Hawker Siddeley Trident /tri-jet/ fuselage. J. Fielding (Hawker Siddeley Aviation, Ltd., Woodford, Ches., England). In: Titanium science and technology: Proceedings of the Second International Conference, Cambridge, Mass., May 2-5, 1972. Volume 1.

New York, Plenum Press, 1973. p. 45-52. Three particular areas were chosen for evaluation, viz., the sheet/stringer/frame structure in the keel area, the upper fuselage, and a window panel area. The usual attention was given to fatigue strength, critical crack length, and residual strength. Fusion welding was used whenever practicable, i.e., for skin to stringer joints and panel butt welds, with a little electrical resistance spot welding for the frame to fuselage skin attachment. The weight savings possible with titanium design as compared with an aluminum structure amounted to 23.6% overall on the complete fuselage section. Chemical milling, through welding under tension, welding on the tension draw welding machine, and vacuum hot sizing are discussed.

F.R.L.

A74-16108 * An optimum organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary Space Base. J. M. Ragusa (NASA, Sciences and Applications Projects Office, Kennedy Space Center, Fla.). In: Technology today and tomorrow; Proceedings of the Tenth Space Congress, Cocoa Beach, Fla., April 11-13, 1973.

Cape Canaveral, Fla., Canaveral Council of Technical Societies, 1973, p. 3-17 to 3-29. 6 refs.

The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify an optimum hypothetical organizational structure for a large earthorbiting multidisciplinary research and applications (R&A Space Base manned by a mixed crew of technologists. Since such a facility does not presently exist, in situ empirical testing was not possible. Study activity was, therefore, concerned with the identification of a desired organizational structural model rather than the empirical testing of it. The essential finding of this research was that a four-level project type 'total matrix' model will optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of Space Base technologists. (Author)

A74-16111

Management systems for operational processing of launch vehicles. A. G. Mackey (American Airlines, Inc., Tulsa, Okla.). In: Technology today and tomorrow; Proceedings of the Tenth Space Congress, Cocoa Beach, Fla., April 11-13, 1973.

Cape Canaveral, Fla., Canaveral Council of Technical Societies, 1973, p. 4.7 to 4.18.

This paper summarizes the status of management information systems with emphasis on applications to planning and management of airline maintenance and refurbishment operations. Pastap proaches to management of launch operations are reviewed and analyzed for their applicability to the Space Shuttle era. Factors

A7416447

B-1 cost/weight trade methodology. R. E. Edmonson and W. A. Reinsch (North American Rockwell Corp., Los Angeles, Calif.). In: Titanium science and technology: Proceedings of the Second International Conference, Cambridge, Mass., May 2.5, 1972. Volume

New York, Plenum Press, 1973, p. 57-68.

A development is described which provides the capability for detailed subsystem selections based on cost/weight to a degree of credibility not previously obtainable. The process is based on the comparison of the weight differentials of competitive subsystem elements, converting these differentials to dollar value, and then evaluating these dollar values along with the detail acquisition cost estimate of the candidate design. This cost/weight trade study methodology has provided early visibility for potential cost and risk problems, and is considered a strong management tool for design decisions. In general, the structural components using titanium are required to be cost/weight effective, and to exhibit high fatigue life, good fracture toughness, and be relatively damage-tolerant. Annealed 6A1-4V was selected for these applications.

F.R.L. A74.16878 # The importance of technical cooperation for airline companies in Europe with particular reference to the technical cooperation ATLAS (Die Bedeutung von Technischen Kooperationen für Luftverkehrsgesellschaften innerhalb Europas unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Technischen Kooperation ATLAS). H. Gröger. Braunschweig. Technische Universität, Philosophische und sozialwissenschaftliche Fakultät. Doktor der Staatwissenschaften Dissertation, 1972. 152 p. 127 rets. In German. Research supported by Deutsche Lufthansa.

The complexity of the problems involved in establishing technological cooperation based on work division among the member airlines is illustrated, and the various aspects of these problems are discussed. The organization, activity, and the technical information system within the European Airlines Montparnasse Committee are outlined. The aspects of the cooperation of the Swissair/Austrian airlines, the SAS/Swissair airlines, the Dutch/SAS/Swissair and Dutch/SAS/Swissair/French Trans Airlines are discussed. Data concerning the technical cooperation ATLAS (Air France/Lufthansa/ Alitalia/Sabena) are covered in detail.

V.P.

A74-17159# Integrated test planning in the AEROS project (Integrierte Testplanung im Projekt AEROS). K. Fahlenbock (Dornier-System GmbH, Friedrichshafen, West Germany). Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Symposium über wissen. schaftlich-technische Ergebnisse des AEROS-Programms, Meersburg, West Germany, Oct. 18, 19, 1973, Paper 73-141. 24 p. In German. Research supported by the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Wissenschaft.

Description of the provisions of an integrated test plan which gives an overview of the flight viability tests to be performed and their incorporation into the schedule planning of the AEROS project. The philosophy underlying integrated test planning is defined, and the role played by simulation of various environmental and space conditions in the qualification and acceptance of components and systems is indicated. The provisions of an integrated test plan are then described which is based on the general philosophy that almost all qualification and acceptance tests at the component level should be carried out as specified for the overall system. This integrated test plan involves a careful consideration of the influence parameters, specification of the qualification and acceptance range, developmental tests, functional tests, and the compiling of docu. mentation. It is shown by examples how the actual integrating process takes place during the project.

A.B.K.

A74-17154 # Specific features of AEROS satellite develop. ment (Die besonderen Merkmale bei der Entwicklung des Satelliten AEROS). K.-J. Gluitz (Dornier-System GmbH, Friedrichshafen, West Germany). Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Symposium über wissenschaftlich-technische Ergebnisse des AEROSProgramms, Meersburg, West Germany, Oct. 18, 19, 1973, Paper 73.132. 29 p. in German. Research supported by the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Wissenschaft.

The AEROS project organization and management are discussed, and the principal data on the AEROS mission and the AEROS satellite itself are reviewed. The relationship between the customer and the principal contractor, and between the principal contractor and subcontractors are outlined. The development and model philosphies of the AEROS project are discussed, along with the component and satellite models, and the test phylosophy. Some engineering characteristics and new developments concerning the system structure, the power supply system, the active magnetic attitude control system, the orbital correction system, and the communications system are examined.

V.P.

A74-17162 # The AEROS rocket program (AEROS Raketenprogramm). H. Demharter and A. Kirchner (MesserschmittBölkow-Blohm GmbH, Ottobrunn, West Germany). Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Symposium über wissenschaftlich. technische Ergebnisse des AEROS-Programms, Meersburg, West Germany, Oct. 18, 19, 1973, Paper. 27 p. in German. Research supported by the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Wissenschaft.

A high-altitude research probe program carried out within the AEROS satellite project is described. Particular attention is given to three types of EUV payload and four types of combination payload developed in the program. The scientific task of the payload experiments was to measure in vertical profile the same aeronomic parameters that were measured by the AEROS satellite in horizontal profile.

V.P.

A74-17158 # Development of the AEROS structure (Ent wicklung der AEROS-Struktur). W. Walter (Dornier-System GmbH, Friedrichshafen, West Germany). Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Symposium über wissenschaftlich-technische Ergebnisse des AEROS-Programms, Meersburg, West Germany, Oct. 18, 19, 1973, Paper 73-140, 22 p. In German. Research supported by the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Wissenschaft.

Description of the various stages of development of the structure of the AEROS satellite. After stating the requirements to be met by the AEROS structure and the philosophy governing the design of the structure, a brief description is given of the structure itself. The latter is basically divided into a star-shaped load-bearing structure which houses most of the components mounted in the satellite and an outer structure in the shape of a cylindrical shell which protects the components from the outside and houses certain sensors, the engines, and the despin system. The methods used in static and dynamic calculations of strength and reliability are summarized, the materials employed in the fabrication of the structure in order to meet the requirements imposed are noted, and a test program is described which consists of structural component tests, developmental tests on a structural test model, and qualifica. tion tests on a structural qualification model. Finally, the organization of the structure subsystem management is discussed. A.B.K.

A74-17531

Avionics design for maintainability · Are we gaining or losing. T. A. Ellison (United Air Lines, Inc., Chicago, III.). Society of Automotive Engineers, National Aerospace Engineering and Manufacturing Meeting, Los Angeles, Calif., Oct. 16-18, 1973, Paper 730882. 9 p. Members, $1.25; nonmembers, $2.00.

An overview of avionics maintainability, as indicated from airline operating statistics, shows improvement in some elements and degradation in others, but a slowly degrading overall trend. Maintain. ability elements and trends are identified and discussed. Principal problems are the shop labor expended for the high proportion of removed equipment found to be in satisfactory condition, and the increasing line maintenance effort required by wide-body aircraft. Built-in test equipment (BITE) or monitoring within the system, if properly designed, appears to be a good approach to improve this situation. Design guidance for effective BITE or monitoring objectives is provided.

(Author)

A74-17536

The T700-GE-700 turboshatt engine program. W. J. Crawford, III (General Electric Co., Aircraft Engine Group, Lynn, Mass.). Society of Automotive Engineers, National Aerospace Engineering and Manufacturing Meeting, Los Angeles, Calif., Oct. 16-18, 1973, Paper 730917. 14 p. Members, $1.25; non members, $2.00.

The 1500 SHP 1700 engine is being developed for the U.S. Army UTTAS and AAH helicopters. Prototype engines have been running well since testing began early in 1973. Qualification is expected in early 1976. Engine history and current details, design features, program milestones and possible future developments are reviewed. The unique T700 design will achieve unusually high levels of reliability and maintainability.

T.M.

Advances and innovations in air traffic communications since the early 1920s are reviewed and shown to have been evolutionary in the sense of successive generations identifiable in relative time frames. The present status of development is defined, and current trends and goals for the future are discussed.

M.V.E.

A74-17541

Development of requirements for, and evalua. tion of, manufacturer advanced design aircraft. J. D. Graef (American Airlines, Inc., New York, N.Y.). Society of Automotive Engineers, National Aerospace Engineering and Manufacturing Meeting, Los Angeles, Calif., Oct. 16-18, 1973, Paper 730948. 15 p. Members, $1.25; nonmembers, $2.00.

A74-18099

An innovative approach to airport planning. H. L. Newman (FAA, Fort Worth, Tex.). Journal of Air Law and Commerce, vol. 39, Summer 1973, p. 353-359.

The spirit of foresight and cooperation is described that made the realization of the mammoth Dallas-Fort Worth Airport Project possible. The airport was officially dedicated in September 1973. The main considerations that went into the planning of this airport and the experiences of the people who worked on this project are reviewed.

M.V.E.

A74-17544 * On the management and processing of earth resources information. C, W. Skinner (North Carolina State Univer. sity, Raleigh, N.C.) and R. C. Gonzalez (Tennessee, University, Knoxville, Tenn.). In: Machine processing of remotely sensed data; Proceedings of the Conference, West Lafayette, Ind., October 16-18, 1973.

New York, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., 1973, p. 1A-1 to 1A-11. 13 refs. Grant No. NGT 01-003-044.

The basic concepts of a recently completed large-scale earth resources information system plan are reported. Attention is focused throughout the paper on the information management and processing requirements. After the development of the principal system concepts, a model system for implementation at the state level is discussed.

(Author)

A74-18182

Air traffic control (Flugsicherung). O. Heer (Bundesanstalt für Flugsicherung, Frankfurt am Main, West Germany). VDI-Z, vol. 115, no. 18, Dec. 1973, p. 1462-1465. 18 refs. In German.

For the last two years studies concerned with the air traffic control system of the future have been conducted in West Germany. giving attention to the time after 1980. Questions of long-term planning are discussed together with new developments in the sector of air traffic control and the improvement of existing procedures and installations. Problems of frequency distribution are considered along with traffic flow questions, navigational systems, instrumental landing systems, radio equipment, and radar installations. G.R.

A74-17881

AIAA experiments and results on SDD, syn. optics, miniprints, and related topics. G. L. Dugger (Johns Hopkins University, Silver Spring, Md.), R. F. Bryans, and W. T. Morris, Jr. (American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, New York, N.Y.). (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Conference on the Future of Scientific and Technical Journals, New York, N.Y., May 17-19, 1973.) IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, vol. PC-16, Sept. 1973, p. 100-106, 178.

Description of reader and author surveys conducted to evaluate new document presentation and dissemination concepts for scientific literature published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Initial experiments demonstrated user satisfaction and a high level of accuracy in selective dissemination of documents according to specified user requirements (designated topics of interest), but subsequent financial considerations and a lack of sufficiently large volume of operations prevented final implementation of such a system of preferential distribution. Publication costs were reduced by presenting a percentage of articles in the form of synoptics (reduced version containing key information). Reader response to these publications is described together with paper review procedures.

T.M.

A74-18499# An outline of supervisory control fundamentals · Real-time operating systems (Zarys podstaw kierowania · Systemy operacyjne czasu rzeczywistego). S. Wegrzyn (Polska Akademia Nauk, Zaklad Systemow Automatyki Kompleksowej, Gliwice, Poland). Podstawy Sterowania, vol. 3, no. 4, 1973, p. 243-270. 6 refs. In Polish.

Analysis of the operation of a system where a CPU and suitable peripheral equipment are used to control a complex process while also being instructed by the operator to carry out other functions such as delivery of printed records of data, power, and hardware allocation and management. The system consists of basic control and utility programs as well as a supervisory program that selects stored utility and control routines in accordance with process or operator requirements and instructions. The definition corresponds to a real-time operating system whose principal features are examined in detail.

T.M.

A74-18679# Project ACE /acquisition cost evaluation/. S. C. Phillips (USAF, Systems Command, Andrews AFB, Md.). American Institute of Heronautics and Astronautics, Annual Meeting and Technical Display, 10th, Washington, D.C., Jan. 28-30, 1974, Paper 74-279. 10 p. Members, $1.50; nonmembers, $2.00.

The Air Force Sy Command launched a high priority workshop effort in March 1973 to identify possible ways to drive down the high costs of acquisition and ownership of weapon systems. Acquisition practices, methods, policies, and procedures used by the Air Force were analyzed and are reviewed in detail. Many findings are not new but are restated for renewed emphasis. Lucrative areas having high potential for reducing costs, identified during the Project, are undergoing exhaustive research and study under the cognizance of Systems Command. Actions taken and those

A74-17984

Innovations in ATC communication systems. R. Wainwright (FAA, Washington, D.C.). In: National Telecommunications Conference, Atlanta, Ga., November 26-28, 1973, Conference Record. Volume 1.

New York, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., 1973, p. 7C-1 to 7C-3

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