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modes, launch configurations, environment impact, and test facility impacts are discussed

FOS

N74-296098 Environmental Protection Agency, Research
Triangle Park, NC
(DESIGN AND OPERATION OF NATIONAL ENVIRONMEN-
TAL RESEARCH CENTER] Annual Report, 1972
Jun. 1973 85 P
Avail: NTIS HC $7.25

The mission, history, organization, and activities of the conter are discussed. The Community Health and Environmental Surveillance System and the Regional Pollution Study are emphasized. Individual laboratories of the center are described in detail.

EJO

N74-30102 Lincoln Lab, Mass. Inst. of Tech, Lexington PROVISIONAL DATA LINK INTERFACE STANDARD FOR THE DABS TRANSPONDER Project Report G. V. Colby, P. H. Robeck, and J. D. Welch 25 Apr. 1974 23 prots (Contract DOT-FA72WAI-261; FAA Proj. 034-241-012) (AD-778144; ATC-34; FAA-RD-74-64) Avail: NTIS CSCL 17/7

The document specifies provisional data link interface standards for the DABS transponder. It describes the function, timing, and electrical properties of the signals flowing to and from both the Standard Messago Interlace and the Extended Langth Mossage Interface.

Author (GRA)

N74-30308*# Grumman Aerospace Corp. Bethpage, NY SPACE SHUTTLE SYSTEM PROGRAM DEFINITION. VOLUME 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Final Report 15 Mar 1972 49 D (Contract NAS9-11160) (NASA-CR-134338: MSC-03824-Vol-1: B-35-43: AP-33) Avail: NTIS HC $5.50 CSCL 22B

A study for the selection of a low cost shuttle system for design and development was conducted. The objective of the final study was to examine and penetrate the major technical and cost issues affecting the choice of the following: (1) liquid propulsion recoverable or solid propulsion recoverable booster, (2) parallel burn/parallel mount or series burn/tandem mount configurations, and (3) payload weight and payload bay size of the orbiter. The matrix of program options which were considered in the study is developed.

Author

N74-30103# Lincoln Lab., Mass. Inst. of Tech., Lexington, PROVISIONAL MESSAGE FORMATS FOR THE DABS/NAS INTERFACE D. Rainer and H F Vandevenne 25 Apr. 1974 41 p rets (Contract DOT-FA72WAI-261) (AD-778450; ATC-33; FAA-RD-74-63) Avail: NTIS CSCL 17/7

The document defines formats for messages which are to be transmitted between Discrete address Beacon System (DABS) and National Airspace System (NAS) facilities (en route or terminal). Those mossages include one-way Surveillance Reports to NAS and two-way Communications Messages. The latter support data link functions betweon NAS and DABS-equipped aircraft, as well as aiding in the monitoring and control of DABS sensors. These message formats will be used in the design and construction of interface equipment and ground data links for prototype system tost and evaluation at NAFEC during Phase II of the DABS Development Program; and, with modifications resulting from this test and evaluation offort, will form the basis for the operational implomentation of DABS. Author (GRA)

N74-30379*# National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
A MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM MODEL FOR
PROGRAM MANAGEMENT Ph.D. Thesis · Oklahoma State
Univ.
David Leon Shipman 28 Jul. 1972 85 p refs
(NASA-TM-X-70230) Avail: NTIS HC $7.25 CSCL 05B

The development of a model to simulate the information system of a program management type of organization is reported. The model statistically determines the following parameters: type of messages, destinations, delivery durations, type processing. processing durations, communication channels. outgoing messages, and priorites. The total management information system of the program management organization is considered, including formal and informal information flows and both facilities and equipment. The model is written in General Purpose System Simulation 2 computer programming language for use on the Univac 1108, Executive 8 computer. The model is simulated on a daily basis and collects queue and resource utilization statistics for each decision point. The statistics are then used by management to evaluate proposed resource allocations, to evaluate proposed changes to the system, and to identify potential problem areas. The model employs both empirical and theoretical distributions which are adjusted to simulate the information flow being studied.

Author

N74-30300*# National Aeronautics and Space Administration,
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
MSFC SKYLAB LESSONS LEARNED
Jul, 1974 74 p
(NASA-TM-X-64860) Avail: NT.S HC $3.75 CSCL 22C

Key lessons learned during the Skylab Program that could have impact on on-going and future programs are presented. They present early and sometimes subjective opinions; however. they give insights into key areas of concern. These experiences from a complex space program management and space flight serve as an early assessment to provide the most advantage to programs underway. References to other more detailed reports are provided

Author

N74-30384# Federal Power Commission, Washington, D.C.
GUIDELINES FOR ENERGY CONSERVATION FOR IMMEDI.
ATE IMPLEMENTATION; SMALL BUSINESS AND LIGHT
INDUSTRIES
Feb. 1974 25 p
(FPC/OCE/1) Avail: NTIS HC $4.25

Short term measures to improve the efficiency of fuel utilization by small business concerns and light industry are recommended for particular use during the energy crisis of the Winter of 1974. A course of action is considered that implements the following: (1) control of plant space heating: (2) maintenance and adjustment of combustion equipment: (3) adoption of effective process controls; and (4) modification and upgrading of existing equipment Detailed guidelines are presented which contain information on the specific item to be improved or modified. how energy conservation for that item is attained, how long it will take to implement the measure, and the estimated energy savings involved. A list of professional resources is included to aid management in finding qualified assistance for initiating their own effective energy conservation program.

A.A.D.

N74-30306*# North American Rockwell Corp. Downey. Calif. Space Div. SPACE SHUTTLE PHASE 8. VOLUME 2: TECHNICAL SUMMARY Final Report 15 Mar. 1972 134 p (Contract NAS910960) (NASA CR-134353; MSC-03332 Vol-2) Avail: NTIS HC $9 75 CSCL 228

A summary of the research in the space shuttle program is presented Funding constraints, booster requirements, abort

N74-30386# Committee on Finance (U. S. Senate), ENERGY WINDFALL PROFITS

Washington GPO 1974 131 p Hearings on Section 110 of S. 2589 before Comm. on Finance. 93d Congr., 20 Sess.. 22-23 Jan. 1974 (GPO-28-102) Avail: Comm. on Finance

Testimony relevant to Congressional considerations of a proposal to tax excess or windfall profits in the energy sector is presented. The problems of administration of such a bill. including development of regulations, rulings. and litigation guidelines, are discussed. Corporate management procedures with respect to compliance with the proposed bill are also considered. A definition of income subject to windfall profits tax is submitted. and general debate includes a discussion of Internal Revenue Service precedents, the probable impact on gasoline and fuel allocations, and the world oil supplies issue. The possibility that a profits tax would discourage domestic energy production is also discussed.

A.A.D.

The study is an attempt to develop a multi-project computer scheduling program for the 4950th Test Wing at Wright-Patterson AFB. Ohio. An investigation of the test wing was made to gather information needed to model the flight testing operation, The model uses preliminary planning estimates of manpower and time along with priority rankings as inputs to the computer program. The wing is modeled as a complex system of single line multiple server queues, and the computer is programmed in the GPSS language. The standard GPSS computer output can be used to determine probable project completion dates, resource utilization and efficient allocation, and the effects of various priority decisions. (Modified author abstract)

GRA

N74-30388# Committee on Appropriations (U. S. House).
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT,
SPACE, SCIENCE, VETERANS, AND CERTAIN OTHER
INDEPENDENT AGENCIES APPROPRIATION BILL, 1975
Boland Washington GPO 1974 44 p Rept. to accompany
H.R. 15572 presented by the Comm. on Appropriations at the
93d Congr., 2d sess., 21 Jun, 1974
(H-Rept-93-1139; GPO-99-006) Avail: US Capitol, Senate
Document Room

The committee report to the house is presented. The appropriations for 1974, and the budget estimates for 1975 are discussed for housing, disaster relief, mortages, NASA. and Veterans Administration.

F.O.S.

N74-30402# Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge Energy
Lab
TESTIMONY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY
OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE AND ASTRONAUTICS,
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
David C. White 23 Jul. 1973 8 p
(Grant NSF GI-32874)
(PB-227885/1NSF-RA/N-73.048) Avail. NTIS HC $4.00
CSCL 10A

Recommendations were made that House Bills H.R. 8348 and HR 9133 be modified and amplified to include the following general operational features (1) specific ties to mission-oriented agencies such as the proposed ERDA with line item funding for long term core programs of research and special funding for facility development; (2) special authority to involve industry in R and D programs through both joint funding and cooperative programs to assure rapid reduction of research to practice and effective transfer to the industrial sector: (3) the establishment of a limited number of major research laboratories to supplement the National Laboratories with a clear mission for each; and (4) high level government and industry overview committees that will maintain funding and enhance a strong independent management of the research facility.

GRA

N74-30392*# Boston Coll.. Chestnut Hill, Mass Management Inst. DETERMINANTS OF PROJECT SUCCESS David Charles Murphy, Bruce N. Baker, and Dalmar Fisher 1974 178 p rets (Grant NGR-22-003-028) (NASA-CR-139407) Avail: NTIS HC $12.00 CSCL 05A

The interactions of numerous project characteristics, with particular reference to project performance, were studied. Determinants of success are identified along with the accompanying implications for client organization, parent organization, project organization, and future research. Variables are selected which are found to have the greatest impact on project outcome, and the methodology and analytic techniques to be employed in identification of those variables are discussed.

A.A.D.

N74-30397# Atomic Energy of Canada Lid., Chalk River (Ontario). CHEMISTRY AND MATERIALS DIVISION Progress Report, 1 Jul. - 30 Sep. 1973 Nov, 1973 113 p refs (AECL-4671; PR-CMA-26) Avail. AEC Depository Libraries HC $7.75; Atomic Energy of Can., Ltd., Chalk River $2.00

Progress by the following organizations is reported: solid state science branch, general chemistry branch, physical chemistry branch, materials science branch. McMaster Univ., B. C. Univ., Ottawa Univ., Western Ontario Univ., and Guelph Univ Separate abstracts were reported for the branches. Significant results reported by the universities include: creep of Zr; thermal desorption of H2 from Pt; current-potential relations of Pt electrodes and additive effects (cyanoguanidine, urea); H/D separation factor at Pt in aqueous urea: oxidation-resistant coatings for Zr alloys: positron studies of recovery of Ni and other metals; and positron lifetime spectra of Co. Author (NSA)

N74-30451# Wyoming Univ.. Laramie Water Resources
Research Inst
COAL-ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN THE NORTHERN GREAT
PLAINS
Jack R. Davidson Oct. 1973 137 p Prepared in cooperation
with North Dakota State Univ. and Montana State Univ., Bozeman
Sponsored by the Office of Water Resources Research
(PB-231560/4, OWRR-B-024-WYO(1); W74-07056) Avail
NTIS HC $4.75 CSCL 13B

The growth demand for clean energy has focused attention on western coals, particularly the extensive lignite and subbituminous deposits in the Northern Great Plains. The Font Union Powder River Coal beds, which underlie a large part of northern Wyoming, southeastern Montana and western North Dakota offer the greatest potential for development, because of the vast quantities of coal which can be strip mined. The U.S. Government has undertaken to assess coal/energy development problems through the Northern Great Plains Resources Program (NGPRP). The Water Resource Research Institutes of the three-state area. together with the Office of Water Resources Research, undertook the following tasks; to determine the study needs, to inventory current research efforts and to assess their potential contribution, to establish the priorities for study as seen by the decision makers in the three states, and to assess the capacity of the region's scientists to carry out the needed studies. Eight categories for study were identified; trace elements, atmospheric effects, surface resources (including reclamation); coal resources and mining techniques; water (including water quality), economic and social issues, institutional and legal issues, and technology development

GRA

N74-30398# Air Force Inst. of Tech., Wright-Patterson AFB. Ohio. School of Engineering A MULTI-PROJECT SCHEDULING PROGRAM FOR THE 4950TH TEST WING M.S. Thesis David R. Shearin and Ronald E. Smith Feb. 1974 128 p refs (AD-778874; GSA/ SM/74-11) Avail: NTIS CSCL 15/5

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for food packaging sizes based on previously generated space shuttle menus. The results of the study are shown, along with the range of meal choices considered.

A.A.D.

SKYLAB FOOD SYSTEM LABORATORY SUPPORT Final Roport, 1 May 1972 · 30 Jun. 1974 Dennis Sanford 30 Jun. 1974 65 p (Contract NAS9-12926) (NASA-CR-134380) Avail: NTIS HC $6.25 CSCL 06H

A summary of support activities performed to ensure the quality and reliability of the Skylab food system design is reported. The qualification test program was conducted to verity crew compartment compatibility, and to certity compliance of the food system with nutrition, preparation, and container requirements. Preflight storage requirements and handling procedures were also determined. Information on Skylab food items was compiled including matters pertaining to serving size, preparation information, and mineral, calorie, and protein content. Accessory hardware and the engraving of food utensils were also considered, and a stowage and orientation list was constructed which takes into account menu use sequences, menu items, and hardware stowage restrictions. A food inventory system was established and food thermal storage tests were conducted. Problems and comments pertaining to specific food items carried onboard the Skylab Workshop were compiled.

A.A.D.

N74-30494*# Pillsbury Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn. SPACE SHUTTLE/FOOD SYSTEM STUDY. VOLUME 2. APPENDIX F: FLIGHT FOOD AND PRIMARY PACKAGING Final Report (1974) 252 p (Contract NAS9-13138) (NASA-CR-134378) Avail: NTIS HC $15.75 CSCL 06H

The analysis and selection of food items and primary packaging, the development of menus, the nutritional analysis of diet, and the analyses of alternate food mixes and contingency foods is reported in terms of the overall food system design for space shuttle flight. Stowage weights and cubic volumes associated with each alternate mix were also evaluated. Author

N74-30492*# Pillsbury Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn. SPACE SHUTTLE/FOOD SYSTEM STUDY. VOLUME 2, APPENDIX A: ACTIVE HEATING SYSTEM-SCREENING ANALYSIS. APPENDIX B: RECONSTITUTED FOOD HEATING TECHNIQUES ANALYSIS Final Report (1974) 170 D (Contract NAS9-13138) (NASA-CR-134375) Avail: NTIS HC $11.50 CSCL 06H

Technical data are presented which were used to evaluate active heating methods to be incorporated into the space shuttle food system design, and also to evaluate the relative merits and penalties associated with various approaches to the heating of rehydrated food during space flight. Equipment heating candidates were subject to a preliminary screening performed by a selection rationale process which considered the following parameters: (1) gravitational effect; (2) safety; (3) operability: (4) system compatibility: (5) serviceability: (6) crew acceptability: (7) crew time: (8) development risk; and (9) operating cost. A hot air oven, electrically heated food tray, and microwave oven were selected for further consideration and analysis. Passive. semi-active, and active food preparation approaches were also studied in an effort to determine the optimum method for heating rehydrated food. Potential complexity. cost, vehicle impact penalties, and palatability were considered in the analysis. A summary of the study results is provided along with cost estimates for each of the potential sytems

A.A.D.

N74-30495*# Pillsbury Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn. SPACE SHUTTLE/FOOD SYSTEM STUDY. VOLUME 2. APPENDIX G: GROUND SUPPORT SYSTEM ANALYSIS. APPENDIX Hi GALLEY FUNCTIONAL DETAILS ANALY. SIS (1974) 60 D (Contract NAS9.13138) (NASA-CR-134379) Avail: NTIS HC $6.00 CSCL 06H

The capabilities for preflight feeding of flight personnel and the supply and control of the space shuttle flight food system were investigated to determine ground support requirements; and the functional details of an onboard food system galley are shown in photographic mockups. The elements which were identified as necessary to the efficient accomplishment of ground support functions include the following: (1) administration; (2) dietetics: (3) analytical laboratories: (4) flight food warehouse: (5) stowage module assembly area; (6) launch site module storage area; (7) alert crew restaurant and disperse crew galleys: (8) ground food warehouse: (9) manufacturing facilities; (10) transport; and (11) computer support. Each element is discussed according to the design criteria of minimum cost, maximum flexibility, reliability, and efficiency consistent with space shuttle requirements. The galley mockup overview illustrates the initial operation configuration, food stowage locations, meal assembly and serving trays, meal preparation configuration, serving, trash management, and the logistics of handling and cleanup equipment.

A.A.D.

N74-30706*# National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
THIRD EARTH RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY SATELLITE-1
SYMPOSIUM. VOLUME 1: TECHNICAL PRESENTATIONS,
SECTION A
Stanley C. Freden, comp, Enrico P. Mercanti, comp., and Margaret
A. Becker, comp. Washington 1974 992 p refs Symp. held
at Washington, D. C., 10-14 Dec. 1973
(NASA-SP-351-Vol-1 - Sect-A) Avail: NTIS MF $1.45: SOD
HC $16.80 per set of sections A and B CSCL 05B

Papers presented at the Third Symposium on Significant Results obtained from the first Earth Resources Technology Satellite covered the areas of, agriculture, forestry, range resources. land use, mapping, mineral resources, geological structure, landform surveys, water resources, marine resources, environment surveys, and interpretation techniques.

N74-30493*# Pillsbury Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn. SPACE SHUTTLE/FOOD SYSTEM. VOLUME 2. AP. PENDIX C: FOOD COOLING TECHNIQUES ANALYSIS. APPENDIX D: PACKAGE AND STOWAGE: ALTERNATE CONCEPTS ANALYSIS (1974) 151 p (Contract NAS9-13138) (NASA-CR-134376) Avail: NTIS HC $10.75 CSCL 06H

The relative penalties associated with various techniques for providing an onboard cold environment for storage of perishable food items, and for the development of packaging and vehicle stowage parameters were investigated in terms of the overall food system design analysis of space shuttle. The degrees of capability for maintaining both a 40 F to 45 F refrigerated temperature and a O F and 20 F frozen environment were assessed for the following cooling techniques: (1) phase change (heat sink) concept; (2) thermoelectric concept: (3) vapor cycle concept; and (4) expendable ammonia concept. The parameters considered in the analysis were weight, volume, and spacecraft power restrictions. Data were also produced for packaging and vehicle stowage parameters which are compatible with vehicle weight and volume specifications. Certain assumptions were made

N74-30731* Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis.
ERTS-1 ROLE IN LAND MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING
IN MINNESOTA
Joseph E. Sizer (Minn. State Planning Agency) and Dwight Brown
In NASA. Goddard Space Flight Center 3d ERTS-1 Symp..
Vol. 1. Sect. A. 1974 p 341-350

(Paper-L3) CSCL 088

Research on applications of ERTS-1 imagery to land use has focused on evaluating the ability of ERTS-1 imagery to update and refine the detail of land use information in the Minnesota Land Management Information System. Work has been directed toward defining the capabilities of the ERTS-1 system to provide information about surface cover by identifying forest, water, and wetland resources; urban and agricultural development and testing and evaluating data input and output procedures. As capabilities were developed, meetings were held with administrators and resource information users from various agencies of government to identify their information needs. A full scale systems test for several selected pilot areas in the state is nearly complete. Users have been identified for each test area and they have been instrumental in identifying data requirements and analysis needs for administrative purposes. Users have both rural and urban orientations and provide a basis for evaluation of the results.

Author

best available conventional sources for a 10.000 square kilometer test area in eastern Wisconsin. First, the data from the three sources is compared on a spatial basis for a 300 square kilometer portion of the test area. For those land resource variables associated with cover, ERTS derived resource data compared favorably with both the RB-57 and conventional data. Second, the effect of the data source on land use decisions is examined. Three interstate highway corridors are located through the same region based upon data extracted from each of the three sources. A policy of preserving natural environmental systems was used as a basis for the corridors selection in each case. The resulting three corridors compare favorably.

Author

N74-30733* Dartmouth Coll., Hanover. N.H. Project in Remote
Sensing
EVALUATION OF ERTS-1 DATA FOR ACQUIRING LAND
USE DATA OF NORTHERN MEGALOPOLIS
Robert B Simpson, David T. Lindgren, and William D. Goldstein
In NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 3d ERTS-1 Symp..
Vol. 1. Sect. A 1974 p 371-381

N74-30740* New Jersey Dept. of Environmental Protection,
Trenton.
IMPACT OF ERTS-1 IMAGES ON MANAGEMENT OF NEW
JERSEY'S COASTAL ZONE
Edward B. Feinberg, Roland S. Yunghans, JoAnn Stitt, and Robert
L. Mairs (Earth Satellite Corp., Washington, D. C.) in NASA.
Goddard Space Flight Center 3d ERTS-1 Symp., Vol. 1. Sect. A
1974 p 497-503
(Paper-L12) CSCL 08B

The thrust of New Jersey's ERTS investigation is development of procedures for operational use of ERTS-1 data by the Department of Environmental Protection in the management of the State's coastal zone. Four major areas of concern were investigated: detection of land use changes in the coastal zone: monitoring of offshore waste disposal: siting of ocean outfalls; and allocation of funds for shore protection. ERTS imagery was not useful for shore protection purposes; it was of limited practical value in the evaluation of offshore waste disposal and ocean outfall siting. However, ERTS imagery shows great promise for operational detection of land use changes in the coastal zone. Some constraints for practical change detection have been identified.

Author

(Paper-L5) CSCL 08B

State planners are increasingly becoming interested in ERTS as a possible method for acquiring land use data. An important consideration to them is whether ERTS can provide such data at a savings in both time and money over alternative systems. A preliminary evaluation of ERTS as a planning tool is given.

Author

N74-30735* Geological Survey, Washington, D.C. Geographic
Applications Program.
CHANGE IN LAND USE IN THE PHOENIX (1:250,000)
QUADRANGLE, ARIZONA BETWEEN 1970 AND 1973:
ERTS AS AN AID IN A NATIONWIDE PROGRAM FOR
MAPPING GENERAL LAND USE
John L. Place In NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 3d
ERTS-1 Symp., Vol. 1. Sect. A 1974 p 393-423

N74-30741* Geological Survey. Reston, Va. Geographic
Applications Program
CARETS: AN EXPERIMENTAL REGIONAL INFORMATION
SYSTEM USING ERTS DATA
Robert H. Alexander in NASA. Goddard Space Flight Center
3d ERTS-1 Symp., Vol. 1, Sect. A 1974 D 505-522 refs

(Paper-L7) CSCL 08B

Changes in land use between 1970 and 1973 in the Phoenix (1:250.000 scale) Quadrangle in Arizona have been mapped using only the images from ERTS-1, tending to verify the utility of a standard land use classification system proposed for use with ERTS images. Types of changes detected have been: (1) new residential development of former cropland and rangeland: (2) new cropland from the desert; and (3) new reservoir fill-up. The seasonal changing of vegetation patterns in ERTS has complemented air photos in delimiting the boundaries of some land use types. ERTS images, in combination with other sources of information, can assist in mapping the generalized land use of the fifty states by the standard 1.250.000 quadrangles. Several states are already working cooperatively in this type of mapping

Author

(Paper-L13) CSCL 08F

The U. S. Geological Survey CARETS (Central Atlantic Regional Ecological Test Site)/ERTS investigation is testing the applicability of ERTS data as input to an environmental information system for a multi-state mid-Atlantic region surrounding the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays. The information system framework encompasses a flow of information through several stages from sensor to user, and involving evaluation and feedback from several potential users. Basic assumptions of the CARETS project model are that there is a measurable environmental impact associated with land use and land use change as determined with remote sensor data, and that the ERTS derived land use data sets, when properly calibrated, may thus provide regional planners and administrators with a shortcut to an understanding of the environmental changes that are going on in their regions.

Author

N 74-30736* Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Environmental
Monitoring and Data Acquisition Group.
THE APPLICATION OF ERTS-1 DATA TO THE LAND USE
PLANNING PROCESS
James L. Clapp. Ralph W. Kiefer, Edward L. Kuhlmey, and Bernard
J. Niemann, Jr. In NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center 3d
ERTS-1 Symp., Vol. 1, Sect. A 1974 p 425-438

N74-30747* Wyoming Univ., Laramie. Dept. of Geology
APPLICATION OF THE ERTS SYSTEM TO THE STUDY OF
WYOMING RESOURCES WITH EMPHASIS ON THE USE
OF BASIC DATA PRODUCTS
Robert S. Houston, Ronald W. Marrs. Roy M. Breckenridge, and
D. L. Blackstone, Jr. In NASA. Goddard Space Flight Center
3d ERTS-1 Symp., Vol. 1, Sect. A 1974 D 595-619 refs
(Paper-G1) CSCL 08G

Many potential users of ERTS data products and other aircraft and satellite imagery are limited to visual methods of analyses of these products. Illustrations are presented from Wyoming

(Paper-18) CSCL 08B

Land resource data has been extracted on a percent of cell basis from ERTS imagery, RB-57 color infrared imagery and

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THIRD EARTH RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY SATELLITE-1
SYMPOSIUM. VOLUME 1: TECHNICAL PRESENTATIONS.
SECTION е
Suey C Freder cro. Erco Mecat como ad Margaret

Wasunton 1974 936 Drets Symo reis
* Washington DC 16-14 Dec. 1973
TASA-SP-351-VOL 1 Sea-8Avad NTIS MF $1 45. Soo
MC $1680 Deva o secros A and B CSCL 058

17431330*NO 4-0 Rooned Corp. Downey Cait SPACE SHUTTLE PHASE & VOLUME 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Fnal Repon *5 Va *972 32 D Contact NA 59. 10960 MASA-C2-134352 SO-72-5--50*2--10: VSC-03332-990-6 Avan VS C 54 75 CSc228

A study was conducted to do the serences among Total syster concepts of space sue conhgtons Emphasis was paced or concepts a lead to selector of a system that perform the nossos budget and schedue constants The spect of a verde sorra.atons is Austrated An nboard profte of the spacecraft s presented to show the renor arrangement of the ao subsystems the peformance prediction of the spacecrate ouing spected pozons of the mission is anayzed A cost comparison of the various concepts smcluded

Author

N74 30964*, Nacral Aeronautics and Space Adrustration, Washington, DC MACHINE TOOLS AND FIXTURES: A COMPILATION Technology Utilization (1974 27 (NASA-SP-5910405) Avas NTIS HC $100 CSCL 131

Innovations developed by NASA, AEC, and then contractors concerning tools, adaptors, rugs, and futures useful in machung a wide variety of materials are presented

AL

N74-31334* National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsvine Alla
MSFC SKYLAB APOLLO TELESCOPE MOUNT
A R Morse 28 Jun 1974 429 D
(NASA-TM-X-64811) Avai NTIS HC $900 CSCL 228

A technical history and management antique of the Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) from utcai conception through the design, manufactuning testing and prelaunch phases is presented A mission performance summary provides a general overview of the ATM's achievements in relationship to its design goals Recommendations and conclusions applicable to hardware design, test program philosophy and performance and program management techniques for the ATM with potential application to future programs are also discussed

Author

N74-31087: RAND Corp. Santa Monica, Calif
SAN DIEGO CLEAN AIR PROJECT SUMMARY REPORT
Bruce F Goeller et al Dec 1973 144 Drets Sponsored by
San Diego County and EPA
"A 1362 SD) Ava NTIS HC $10 25

The San Diego Clean Air Project was undertaken to analyze alternatxe aur pottution control strategies in terms of their various envuonmental transponatronal economic, and distributional img acts on San Diego and to identity the most promising strategy for implementation An overall strategy for the region termed a mized strategy, combines three types of pure strategy (1) foed vurce controls including ancrah because their significant emissons occur at or near ampons), 12 retrofit devices and inspection/sr aintenance policies for light duty motor vehicles, and 13) transportation management A screening process was employet to compare prospective pure and mixed strategies as to their cost effectiveness and efficiency in reducing emissions, primarily of reactive hydrocarbons the most serious pollutant in San Diego County Nominal, medium, and maximal fixed-source control strategies are identified along with 28 possible retrofit strategies Tentative decisions are reponed and the problems in planning and implemantation of the project are outlined Author

N7431338# Rockwell International Corp.. Canoga Park Calif.
SPACE SHUTTLE: AN OPPORTUNITY FOR UNIVERSITY
RESEARCH
(1974) 8 D
Avail NTIS HC $400

The advantages of using the space shuttle as a carrier of university experiments are discussed in terms of cost benefits. length and frequency of flights, multiplicity of payioad capabilities. and direct onboard expenmental control. A typical university research experiment is described as an example of the uses versus the alternatives of space shuttle flight, and typical problem areas are identified which would lend themselves successfully to shuttle operations. The direct implications of cooperation for both the university and for the space shuttle program are defined

A.A.D.

N74-31093# RAND Corp, Santa Monica, Calif
SAN DIEGO CLEAN AIR PROJECT: EXECUTIVE SUM-
MARY
Bruce F. Goeller et al Dec 1973 19 D Sponsored by San
Diego County and EPA
(A-1362/1-SD) Avail NTIS HC $4 00

N74-31339# Rockwell International Corp. Canoga Park. Calif.
SPACE SHUTTLE: THE TIMING IS RIGHT
(1971) 16 D
Avail NTIS HC $4 00

The capabilities provided by the space shuttle program are interpreted within the larger realms of societal needs and

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