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of the merits of such a production, have heard pages / sophically replied: "Ah, well, if you always look for of the sweet poem read, and praise it. We have probability you will never find out the truth."-Reheard portions of the poetic melody, and commend view of V. Hugo's Life. it also. The volume will comprise some four hundred pages beautifully illustrated, and will be out in time AN IMPROVEMENT IN CRINOLINE.-A tradesman in for the holidays. We predict an extensive sale for Piccadilly has made an astounding discovery. This this beautiful poem, and an enviable fame for its distinguished person has met the great want of gifted authoress.

He has discovered a crinoline which

won't get into eccentric and unbecoming angles Dr. Lord's LECTURES. It will gratify the lecture when ladies get into omnibuses or press through loving public to learn that the eloquent historic lec- crowds. The article in question is called the "Onturer, Dr. John Lord, will soon repeat his course of dina, or waved jupon," and the inventor thus delectures in this city, on the Illustrious and Celebrat- scribes its wonderful properties: “It does away with ed Women of Europe. In power and force of lan- the upsightly results of the ordinary hoops; and so guage, in graphic delineation of character, and in perfect are the wave-like bands that a lady may asinstructive interest, few lecturers come up to the cend a steep stair, lean against a table, throw her. standard of Dr. Lord.

self into an arm-chair, pass to her stall at the opera,

or occupy a fourth seat in a carriage, without inconACADEMY OF Music.-Mr. Maretzek, the popular venience to herself or others, or provoking the and successful manager of the musical forces at the rude remarks of the observers, besides removing or Academy, we observe, is winning golden opinions modifying in an important degree all those peculi. from the press and the public, by his skillful and arites tending to destroy the modesty of English energetic efforts to gratify the lovers of song, and women: and lastly, it allows the dress to fall into improve the taste in the highest styles of music in graceful folds." the Italian opera, by the excellent company and accomplished musical artists he employs.

ARAB HORSES. -The much-vexed point as to the

merits of English and Arab horses has just again REMARKABLE DISCOVERIES AT POMPEII.—New dis- been tried in Cairo. Ali Pasha, who has the finest coveries are reported from Pompeii. A house has stud of Arabs in Egypt, maintained that no English been uncovered, which, to judge from the splendor horse could run against an Arab for four miles. His of its interior, and its almost perfect furniture, highness Halim Pacha offered to run Companion, a must have belonged to a very wealthy proprietor. well-known racer here, against him for any sum he The dining-room is paved with mosaic. The com-liked. The match was run from the first station on pletely served table is covered with petrified rem- the Suez desert to Cairo. The English horse, which nants of dishes; and around it are found three di- was bred by Lord Ribblesdale, won in a canter by vaos, or table-beds, of bronze, richly adorned with more than half a mile. Such a crushing defeat has gold and silver, upon which reposed several skele- taken all courage out of the partisans of Arab tons. A great many precious jewels were found horses. What astonished the natives most was that near them. On the table stood, among other orna- Companion, beating his adversary by so great a disments, a very beautifully worked statue of Bacchus, tance, was perfectly fresh and quite ready to turn in silver, with eyes of enamel, a collar of jewels, round and run the distance over again, while the and precious armlets.

Arab was quite exhausted and blown.-Times Alex

andria Correspondent. DOES THE CHILD Know ITS MOTHER ?- At Essonne, the first place they stopped at, Nodier told a good MENTAL development is the never failing reward story apropos of a remark of his, to the effect that of intense mental industry. The mind grows by its a child can not always be certain of knowing who own force of action. was its own mother:

“How do you make that out?” asked every one. FACTS ABOUT RAILROAD SPEED.-A railroad - car "By this billiard table.” There was a billiard table moves about seventy-four feet, or nearly twice its in the adjoining room. They asked him to explain own length, in a second. At this velocity the locohimself, and he related that, two years before, a car- motive driving-wheel, six feet in diameter, makes riageful of nurses was returning from fetching their four revolutions in a second, the piston-rod thus nurselings from Paris, in order to convey them to traversing the cylinder eight times. "If a horse and Burgundy, and stopped for breakfast at this inn. In carriage should anproach and cross a track at the order to feed at their ease, the nurses had deposited rate of six miles an hour, an express train approachthe children on the billiard table. Whilst they were ing at the moment would move toward it two in the dining-room some wagoners had entered to hundred and fifty-seven feet while it was in the act play a game, and in removing the babies had placed of crossing; if the horse moved no faster than a them pell-mell on the benches. The nurses, on walk, the train would move toward it more than their return, were much puzzled how to recognize five hundred feet, which fact accounts for the many their nurselings; for we all know that newly-born accidents at such points. When the locomotive children are exactly alike. So they merely exclaim- whistle is opened at the post eighty rods from the ed, “Well, it can't be helped,” and took the child crossing, the train will advance near one hundred ren at random from the pile, merely making a point feet before the sound of the whistle traverses the that the sex of the child was all right. Thus, at the distance to, and is heard at the crossing. present day, probably not less than twenty mothers are tenderly lavishing on the children of others the The track upon which the train of human reformaendearing epithets of my son,” or “my daughter." tion runs is laid in sympathy, and this sympathy can

The story, however, was spoiled by a remark of never be established as long as there exists in the Madame Nodier. “As if," she said, "the linen were heart of virtue the same feeling of hatred toward not sure to be marked.” To wbich Nodier philo- I the singer that is felt toward the sin.

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THE NOTABLES AND THE ARCHDUKE.—The Mexi- | neat, obedient, pleasant, quiet, reflecting, sober, can deputation reached Miramar, the seat of the tender, urbane, 'virtuous, wisé, exemplary, and Archduke Maximilian, in great state from Vienna. zealous. Senor de Estrada made the tender of the crown to the Emperor elect in a lengthy address. He also Lag not behind the wheels of progress, unless presented the roll of the votes of the Chamber you would have your eyes blinded with dust. of Notables of Mexico, splendidly engrossed and in

closed in the head of a scepter of solid gold, manu. SOUTHEY ON DUELLING. - Learning that it was ogla factured

by Mexican artists. The Archduke replied Lord Byron's intention to send him a challenge, in a speech in which he formally set forth the con. Southey prepared the following letter in reply. The ditions on which he will accept the crown, declaring challenge was not sent, however, and the letter was that a monarchy could not be satisfactorily reëstab- found among Southey's papers after his death:

lished in Mexico without the spontaneous consent of doo

“Sir: I have the honor of acknowledging the the whole nation. Having regard also to certain receipt of your letter, and do myself the pleasure of “dangers" which threaten the integrity and inde- replying to it without delay: pendence of the country, it was essential to obtain “In affairs of this kind the parties ought to meet guarantees," and if both these conditions are ful- on equal terms. But to establish equality between filled the Archduke intimates that he will accept the you and me there are three things which ought to proffered crown subject to the approval of his broth. be done ; and then a fourth also becomes necessary er, the Emperor of Austria. In the event of becombefore I can meet you on the field. ing monarch, the Archduke would " open the path "First. You must marry and have four children; of progress" by giving “a constitution” to the please to be particular in having them girls. country of his adoption.

“Second. You must prove that the greater part

of the provision you make for them depends on One hundred and nineteen thousand emigrants your life, and you must be under bonds of four have arrived at this port since January last. The thousand pounds not to be hanged, not to commit

umber who arrived during the same period last year suicide, and not to be killed in a duel—which are was forty-one thousand.

the conditions upon which I have effected an insur

ance on my own life for the benefit of my wife and SAAKSPEARE's three hundredth birthday takes daughters. place in April, 1864, when there is to be a great “Third. I must tell three distinct falsehoods contime in England in his honor. Prof. Rotscher, of cerning you upon the bustings, or in some other no Berlin, calls upon the German nation also to have a less public assembly; and I shall neither be able celebration in honor of one who is not only the poet to do this nor to meet you afterward in the manner of all time but of the whole world.

you propose unless you can perform the fourth thing

- which is: JENNY LIND GOLDSCHMIDT seems to prefer Eng- “You must convert me from the Christian reland to her native land, as a place of residence. In ligion. city and in country, and always pleasantly and "Till all this can be accomplished our dispute agreeably, the people are in the constant habit of must be carried on without the use of any more iron hearing of her enjoying herself and giving pleasure than is necessary for blacking our ink or mending to all around her. She and her husband, Otto Gold- our pens; or any more lead than enters into the schmidt, have been taking a prominent part in a composition of the Edinburgh Review. harvest festival, held at Little Houghton, in North- “I have the honor to subscribe myself, sir, yours, amptonshire. After the sermon, M. Goldschmidt with all proper consideration, took his seat at the organ, and Madame Gold

ROBERT SOUTOEY." schmidt, standing by him, sung a harvest hymn from a book of hymns and chorals arranged by M. BONELLI'S PRINTING TELEGRAPH.—Messages have Goldschmidt.

pow been forwarded and delivered in a distinct Ro

man type on the Liverpool and Manchester route, A BERLIN professor finds that Europe contains where the modern locomotive and railway system 272,000,000 of inhabitants; Asia, 720,000,000; was finally established. So says the Albion. The Africa, 89,000,000; America, 200,000,000 ; Poly- first message sent from the Manchester end was ad. nesia, 2,000,000; total, 1,283,000,000. Of this lit- dressed to the Albion office, with a request to know tle crowd, about 32,000,000 die in, gach year, which if it was satisfactory, and the reply was in the affirmis 87,761 a day, or 61 a minute. Another professor ative. The advantages of the Bonelli system, says calculates that 36,627,843, 275,075,855 people have the Albion, are rapidity and accuracy, and these lived on the earth since the creation.

are attained through the passage of a rule of type un

der a comb containing five teeth, each of which is inA BERLIN artisan has come into possession of a sulated and represents the termination of a line wire. very interesting historical curiosity—the marriage Thus it will be seen that the instrument requires five ring of Luther. On the ring is an inscription bear- line wires to work it efficiently, but the same wires ing the names of Martin Luther and his wife, as well are used for the up and down traffic; and as the rules as the date of their marriage. The possessor is at of type pass under the comb the messages are legipresent in negotiation with the Direction of the bly printed off at the rate of four hundred words per Royal Museum, with a view to its purchase for that minute with accuracy amounting to certainty. Any institution. The Museum authorities entertain no errors are corrected before the dispatch of the mesdoubt as to the genuineness of the relic.

sage, and thus the transmission of them is checked

at the outset. The system of the promoters of the A WOMAN should amiable, benevolent, chari- Bonelli telegraph enables them to make a reduction table, domestic, economical, forgiving, generous, in the charge of transmitting telegrams.- London honest, industrious, judicious, kind, loving, modest, paper.

VOL, LX.-NO. 4

36

THE WESTMINSTER CLOCK. — The Astronomer | ers would have produced their kind according to the Royal reports to the visitors of the Royal Observa law, although they had never been painted. It is tory that the rate of this clock, which records itself not necessary for the rose and the lily that the one at Greenwich daily by galvanic connection, “may should blush so beautiful a red and the other bloom be considered certain, to much less than one second as white as snow. God has made a useful flower-a a week." The original stipulation was that it should useful rose and useful lily—and then painted them. not exceed a second a day, and that was attempted It is as certain as that the Bible is true that he is a to be set aside as impracticable by some of the can- God of taste, as much as he is possessed of those didates for making the clock. Mr. Airy's testimony other attributes. And therefore it is, I say, that I to its accuracy is the more reliable as he had retired rejoice in the erection of such a building for God's in 1853 from the joint superintendence of the work service. Our old stupid notion was-we abhorred on account of some differences with Mr. Denison, Popery so much that we recoiled to the other sideQ. C., who designed the clock and invented the that God was never so well worshiped as in an ugly "gravity escapement" for it, which has since been house. It is a great mistake-a mistake contrary adopted in other large clocks. It may not be gener- to the Bible-contrary to reason and common ally known that most of the wheels are of cast-iron; sense.”—The Builder. the hands and their appendages weigh about a ton and a half, and the pendulum six cwt. The dials IRISH EMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES.—The are twenty-two and a half feet wide, or four hun total emigration of natives of Ireland within the dred feet in area each, and cost more than the clock first six months of 1863—that is, up to 30th of June itself. The cracked Big Ben still hangs in the tower, -was greater by pearly one half than the total emi. with a hole cut in its eide, by which Dr. Percy inves. gration for the entire year 1861, and by a third than tigated its real state, and reported it as “ porous, the entire year 1862. There have left Ireland this unhomogeneous, unsound, and a defective casting." year already 68,136 persons, whereas in 1862 only

49,680 left up to the last day in December; in 1861, INEXHAUSTIBLE LORD BROUGHAM.-Lord Brough- 36,232, and in 1860, 60,835. The destination of am, as young and vigorous in spirit at eighty-four as the emigrant Irish for 1863 is set down as the United he was when he commenced his career, opened the states in by far the greater proportion; 56,564 inseventh annual meeting of the Social Science Con- dividuals have left for that country, and the rest gress at Edinburgh, on Wednesday, in really splen- principally for Australia. The emigration of Irish did style. The old man eloquent spoke for hours for the United States last year being only 33,521 in on the condition of the world. To all nations he all, and for 1861, 28, 209, the latter figure may be rendered the praise that was due, but be was as un- taken as the normal emigration, no exceptional desparing in bis censure. He so described the assas- mand for “laborers" in the United States being sin-like policy of Russia as to show that the inventors in operation in 1861. It would therefore appear of it were mere savages wearing the forms of civil that since January last datives of Ireland have been ization. He attributed to the insane vanity rampant leaving for the States at the rate of nearly ten thouin America much of the calamity by which she is sand a month. now afflicted. He had a lash of bis scorpion whip for the worthless king who made himself hangman to Railway STATISTICS.-In 1862 no less than 180,the Czar. He reviewed progress and oppression in 429,071 passengers traveled on the railways of the France; cast his sagacious eye abroad over the United Kiogdom, besides 56,656 season-ticket bold

world, and then portrayed fairly and cheerfully the ers, who of course all traveled very many times ; * condition of thivgs at home. There was, too, a and also, besides, 262,334 horses, 386,864 dogs,

brief but beautiful allusion to his own growing prox- 3,094,183 cattle, 7,800,928 sheep, and 1,989,892 imity to the angel that may not be avoided by mor- pigs. The passengers were more than in 1861 by tal man. The speech was, in fact, a marvel and a about 7,000,000. They paid £12,295,273 for their triumph.-Atheneum, Oci. 10.

fares. The first class passengers paid £3,332,380;

the second class, £4,018,221; the third class, £4,The city of London, in ten years, has increased 639,260. The proportion of third class passengers in population 441,753 ; New-York, 290,104 souls, is still increasing, and second class rather diminishor 66.37 per cent.; and Philadelphia, 222,484 in- ing. Thirty-five passengers were killed (nine of habitants, or 65.43 per cent. The average number them owing to their own misconduct or want of of bouses during ten years built in London was caution) and 536 were injured. This is less than 6349; in New-York, 1668; and in Philadelphia, half the number who lost their lives in 1861 by rail2805. London has been settled 2000 years, New way accidents. So much for the severity of juries, York 249, and Philadelphia 178.

of late, in their assessments of damages against rail

way companies. The passenger trains traveled 57,A GOD OF TASTE.-At the opening of the new 542,831 miles, and the goods trains nearly as many Free Church at Crathie, in Scotland, already no- The passenger traffic supplied 47.76 per ticed, Dr. Guthrie said: “I highly approve of the cent of the total receipts of the companies, and the resolution of our friends that led them to build such goods traffic 52.24 per cent. The receipts from all a house as this; because there is no greater mistake the traffic amounted to £29,128,658. The traffic in the world than to fancy that while God is a God receipts of railways in the United Kingdom amountof holiness, a God of power, and of justice, he is not ed, for the week ending the 5th of September, on also a God of taste, just as much as he is a God of 10,822 miles, to £645,314, and for the correspondany thing else that is lovely and good. And how do ing week of last year, on 10,428 miles, to £635,814, I prove that? you may ask. I prove that by just showing an increase of 454 miles and of £9500 in asking you to go to the seashore and find out for the receipts. me a shell that is not pretty. I prove that by asking you to go to those meadows and find out a flow- The mind has inore room in it than most people er that is not pretty. Let me tell you that the flow. I think, if you would but furnish the apartments.

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