Annual of Scientific Discovery: Or, Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, for [1850]-71, Exhibiting the Most Important Discoveries and Improvements in Mechanics, Useful Arts, Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, Astronomy, Geology, Biology, Botany, Mineralogy, Meteorology, Geography, Antiquities, Etc., Together with Notes on the Progress of Science ... a List of Recent Scientific Publications; Obituaries of Eminent Scientific Men, Etc. ...

앞표지
 

다른 사람들의 의견 - 서평 쓰기

서평을 찾을 수 없습니다.

선택된 페이지

기타 출판본 - 모두 보기

자주 나오는 단어 및 구문

인기 인용구

139 페이지 - ... exhausted. Shall we terrify ourselves by this thought? Men are in the habit of measuring the greatness and the wisdom of the universe by the duration and the profit which it promises to their own race; but the past history of the earth already shows what an insignificant moment the duration of the existence of our race upon it constitutes.
126 페이지 - I have long held an opinion, almost amounting to conviction, in common I believe with many other lovers of natural knowledge, that the various forms under which the forces of matter are made manifest have one common origin; or, in other words, are so directly related and mutually dependent, that they are convertible, as it were, one into another, and possess equivalents of power in their action.
122 페이지 - ... of producing great effects. I only remind you of the destructive effects of musket-bullets, which in a state of rest are the most harmless things in the world. I remind you of the windmill, which derives its force from the moving air. It may appear surprising that motion, which we are accustomed to regard as a non-essential and transitory endowment of bodies, can produce such great effects. But the fact is, that motion appears to us, under ordinary circumstances, transitory, because the movement...
127 페이지 - In the series of natural processes there is no circuit to be found, by which mechanical force can be gained without a corresponding consumption. The perpetual motion remains impossible. Our reflections, however, gain thereby a higher interest. We have thus far regarded the development of force by natural processes, only in its relation to its usefulness to man, as mechanical force. You now see that we have arrived at a general law, which holds good wholly independent of the application which man...
133 페이지 - ... regarded as a result of the quick heating. The newly-fallen pieces have been for the most part found hot, but not red-hot, which is easily explainable by the circumstance, that during the short time occupied by the meteor in passing through the atmosphere, only a thin superficial layer is heated to redness, while but a small quantity of heat has been able to penetrate to the interior of the mass. 'For this reason the red heat can speedily disappear. Thus has the falling of the meteoric stone,...
189 페이지 - I do not resist the search for them, for no one can do harm, but only good, who works with an earnest and truthful spirit in such a direction. But let us not admit the destruction or creation of force without clear and constant proof. Just as the chemist owes all the perfection of his science to his dependence on the certainty of gravitation applied by the balance, so may the physical philosopher expect to find the greatest security and the utmost aid in the principle of the conservation of force....
118 페이지 - That men like those mentioned, whose talent might bear comparison with the most inventive heads of the present age, should spend so much time in the construction of these figures, which we at present regard as the merest trifles, would be incomprehensible, if they had not hoped in solemn earnest to solve a great problem.
137 페이지 - ... of it. But even should the existence of a resisting medium appear doubtful to us, there is no doubt that the planets are not wholly composed of solid materials which are inseparably bound together. Signs of the existence of an atmosphere are observed on the Sun, on Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. Signs of water and ice upon Mars; and our earth has undoubtedly a fluid portion on its surface, and perhaps a still greater portion of fluid within it. The motions of the tides, however, produce friction,...
122 페이지 - ... forces can motion be diminished or destroyed. A moving body, such as the hammer or the musket-ball, when it strikes against another, presses the latter together, or penetrates it, until the sum of the resisting forces which the body struck presents to its pressure, or to the separation of its particles, is sufficiently great to destroy the motion of the hammer or of the bullet. The motion of a mass regarded as taking the place of working force is called the living force (vis viva) of the mass....
201 페이지 - ... sufficient to counteract the external hydrostatic pressure. The ingenious contrivance fully justified the expectations of the engineer; but the workmen were thus compelled to labor in air condensed under a pressure of about three atmospheres. Among other curious results of this state of things noticed by M. Triger, were the remarkable effects of condensed air on combustion. Much annoyance was at first experienced from the rapid combustion of the candles ; which was only obviated by substituting...