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The yellow fever has caused great alarm among the inhabitants of Staten Island, about seven miles from the city of New York, several residents having died of the disease. It was probably introduced by soldiers returned from Mexico

The American steamers for the Liverpool trade, are getting ready as fast as possible, and are said to be fine vessels by persons competent to form an opinion. It is thought here that, the time is not far distant, when we shall have a steamer arriving from Liverpool daily in our port.

CONSTANTINOPLE.—September 5th.—This city appears to be doomed to calamity; no sooner is one conflagration stifled, than another breaks out. On the 28th, at three in the morning, another fire broke out in a house at Foundoucli, close the grand Mosque of that name. As the wind was strong from the north, it spread rapidly, consuming in its progress the palace of Ahmet Fethi Pacha, and extending as far as the villiage of Tophana, where it was providently stopped. During the eight-hours that it raged, it entirely destroyed the quarters of Sali. Bazar and Foundoucli, which are now a heap of cinders. A Mosque, and upwards of two hundred houses and palaces, belonging to government officers, have been destroyed, Several bodies have been discovered in the ruins.

AUSTRALIA.-An exploring party, headed by the Governor, had discovered a quarry of good building stone, at Yorke's Peninsular. Some tolerable specimens of building stone had also been discovered in the bill, ranges near Adelaide. The South Australian Register of the 16th of February, states, that “In following up two of the lodes of rich silver lead ores, lately intersected in the Wheal Gawler mine, the very promising prospects which they presented when cut off, are being realised.”

New CHARTS. Published and Corrected at the Hydrographic Office, Admiralty, during the month of

August.-Sold by R. B, Bate, 21, Poultry, London, RIVER HUMBER, corrected to 1848. Mr. Calver, R.N., Price 38. San Juan NICARAGUA, Ditto Ditto, Price 6d. FALKLAND ISLANDS, Ditto Capt. Sulivan, R.N., Price 38. LEMNOS ISLAND, Archipelago, Capt. Copeland, R.N., 1835. price 2s. MITYLENI ISLAND, Eastern and Western Ports, Archipelago, Capt. Copeland, R.N.,

1834, price 2s. MOSKO-NISI AND AIVALI BAY,

Ditto

Dilto price 2s. Port LINDO, Rhodes Islands, Archipelago, Capt. Graves, R.N., 1842, price 6d. MAKRY HARBOUR,

Ditto

Dilto

price ls. KARUGHATCH TO MACKRY, Ditto

Ditto

price 2s. DENOSA ISLAND,

Ditto
Ditto

price 6d. Suda Bay & CANEA, (Candia I. Ditto

Ditto 1843 price ls. LEVITHA ISLAND,

Ditto

Ditto 1838 price 6d. TIGANI PORT, Lieut. T. Spratt, R.N, 1844, price 8d. Civita VECCHIA, Italian Survey,

1841 price 1s. CARGADOS Caravos, Capt Sir E. Belcher,

1846 price Is. 60 ARACAN RIVERS, Capts. Lloyd, and Weston, I. N.,

1845 price 2s. MAZATLAN HARBOUR, Capt. Beechey, R.N., F.R.S.,

1828 price Is. 6d. MUGERES HARBOUR, Capt. Barnett, RN.

1844 price Is. 60. RIVER GABOON, Lieut. Å, F Langle, French Survey,

1845 price ls. 6d. Note.-The addition to Towson's Great Circle Table will be presented gratis to the purchaser of the 1st Edition on their application.

Hydrographic Office, Admiralty.

Births.

Sept. 14, at Chiswick, Capt. Smart,

K.H., R.n., to Elizabeth Isabella, daughSept. 3, at Haupton Court, the lady ter of the late B. Sharpe, Esq.. of Capt. Montgomery, R.n., of a daugh - Sept. 19, St. George's, Hanover Sq., ter.

Capt. T. 0. Knox, R.N.. to Louisa IsaSept. 10, the lady of Capt. C. Talbot, bella. daughter of the late Major-Genl. R.N., of twins

Griffith,

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Aug. 31, at Marylebone church, by Lately in Canada, Com. J. Roche. the Rev. C. S. Ellicot, the Rev. Charles Sept. 10, at Stonehouse, T. Miller, John Ellicott, M.A., to Constantia Anne, Esq.. Deputy Inspector of Hospitals. the only surviving daughter of Com. Lately at Sheerness, Mr. T. Webster A. B. Becher, R.N., of Upper Glouces- Sept. 21 Catherine Anne, daughter ter Place, Dorset Square, London. of Rear Adml. Bourchier.

METEOROLOGICAL REGISTER.
Kept at Croom's Hill, Greenwich, by Mr. W. Rogerson, of the Royal Observatory

From the 21st of September to the 20th of October 1848.
Barometer Fahrenheit
In Inches and Thermometer

Wind.

Weather.
Decimals. In the Shade Quarter. Strength.

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AUGUST 1848, Mean height of Barometer- 29.888 inches: Mean Temperature=590

degrees; depth of rain fallen5.09 inches.

TO CORRESPONDENTS. We have received the Yacht VOYAGE to NORWAY, SWEDEN, and DENMARK, by Mr. Ross, but too late for notice in our present number,

Hunt, Printer, 130, St. Alban's Place, (late New Ch::rch Street, Edgware Road,

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January 1st. 1848.-Sailed from Raiatea for Tahiti. On this passage we experienced easterly winds to N.E.b.E., with a heavy swell from the northward and eastward, with heavy squalls, and rain: on the 2nd we fetched up between Sir C. Saunders, and Eimeo Islands, and continued beating round the north end of Eimeo, till the morning of the 5th, when we anchored in Papietee Harbour. Here we remained till the 4th of February, when we weighed for Pitcairns Island, and Valparaiso.

Melville gives the following amusing account of the pilot of Papietee:“ Even with a competent pilot, Papietee Bay is considered a ticklish one to enter. Formed by a bold sweep of the shore, it is protected seaward by the coral reef, upon which the rollers break with great violence. After stretching across the bay, the barrier extends on to Point Venus, (the most northerly point of the island, and so called from Cook's observatory being placed there during his first visit,) which point is in the district of Matavai eight or nine miles distant. Here there is an opening, by which ships enter, and glide down the smooth deep canal between the reef and the shore to the harbour. But, by seamen generally, the leeward entrance is preferred, as the wind is extremely variable inside the reef. This latter entrance is a break in the barrier directly facing the bay and village of Papietee. It is very narrow; and from the bafiling winds, currents, and sunken rocks, ships now and then grate their keels against the coral. No. 11.--VOL. XVII,

3 c

“ But the mate was not to be daunted; so stationing what men he had at the braces, he sprang upon the bulwark, and bidding every body keep wide awake, ordered the helm up. In a few moments we were running in. Being towards noon, the wind was fast leaving us, and by the time the breakers were roaring on either hand little more than steerage-way was left. But on we glided, smoothly and deftly; avoiding the green darkling objects here and three strewn in our path: Jermin occasionally looking down in the water, and then about him with the utmost calmness, and not a word spoken. Just fanned along thus, it was not many minutes 'ere we were past all danger, and floated into the placid basin within. This was the cleverest specimen of his seamanship that he ever gave us.

As we held on toward the frigate and shipping, a canoe coming out from among them approached. In it were a boy and an old man, both islanders; the former nearly naked, and the latter dressed in an old naval frock coat. Both were paddling with might and main; the old man once in a while tearing his paddle out of the water; and after rapping his companion over the head both fell to with fresh vigour. As they came within hail, the old fellow springing on his feet, and flourishing his paddle, cut some of the queerest of capers, all the while jabbering something at first which we could not understand. Presently we made out the following:

"Ah! you pemi, ah! you come!—What for you come?-You be fine for no come pilot.—I say, you hear?--I say, you ita maitai (no good).--You hear?-You no pilot:yes, you d-- me, you no pilot 't all;-Id- you, you hear?'

" This tirade, which shewed plainly that whatever the profane old rascal was at, he was in right good earnest, produced peals of laughter in the ship. Upon which he seemed to get beside himself; and the boy, who, with suspendel paddle, was staring about him, received a sound box over the head, which set him to work in a twinkling, and brought the canoe quite near. The orator now opening afresh, it turned out that his vehement rhetoric was all addressed to the mate, still standing conspicuously on the bulwark.

But Jermin was in no humour to be trifled with, so with a sailor's blessing he ordered him off. The old fellow then flew into a regular frenzy, cursing and swearing worse than any civilized being I ever lieard.

"You sabbee me? he shouted. You know me, ah?-Well, me Jim, me pilot-been pilot now long time.'

66 Ay,' cried Jermin, quite surprised, as indeed we all were, you are the pilot then, you old pagan,—why didn't you come off before this?

“Ah! me sabbee,-me know you piratee (pirate).-See you long time, but no me come-I sabbee you-you ita maitai nuee (superlatively bad).'

«« Paddle away with you,' roared Jermin in a rage; 'be off, or I'll dart a harpoon at ye!'

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“ But instead of obeying the order, Jim, seizing his paddle, darted his canoe right up to the gangway, and in two bounds stood on the deck. Pulling a greasy silk handkerchief still lower over his brow, and improving the sit of his frock coat with a vigourous jerk, he then strode up to the mate, and in a more flowery style than ever, gave him to understand that the redoubtable · Jim' himself was before him; that the ship was his until the anchor was down; and he should like to hear what any one had to say to it.

“ As there seemed little doubt that he was all he claimed to be, the Julia was at last surrendered.

“Our gentleman now proceeded to bring us to an anchor, jumping up between the knight-heads, and bawling out · Luff! luff ! keepy off! keepy off !' and insisting upon each time being respectfully responded to by the man at the helm. At this time our steerage-way was almost gone; and yet in giving his orders the passionate old man made as much fuss as a white squall aboard the Flying Dutchman.

“Jim turned out to be the regular pilot of the harbour, a post be it known, of no small profit; and in his eyes, at least, invested with immense importance. Our unceremonious entrance therefore was regarded as highly insulting, and tending to depreciate both the dignity and lucra. tiveness of his office.*

“ The old man is something of a wizard. Having an understanding with the elements, certain phenomena of theirs are exhibited for his particular benefit :-unusually clear weather with a fine steady breeze, is a certain sign that a merchantman is at hand; whale-spouts seen from the harbour, are tokens of a whaling vessel's approach; and thunder, and lightning, happening so seldom as they do, are proof positive that a man-of-war is near.

“ In short, Jim the pilot, is quite a character in his way, and no one visits Tahiti without hearing some curious story about him."

During the last ten days, at Tahiti, it blew very hard from north-west to south-west, with almost incessant rain, which was the heaviest, and most enduring of any I have ever encountered. On the 7th February. passed the Island of Tooboai; on inaking it from the northward, it appears like two islands, but on closing it, you discover that it is the base of one hill in juxta-position with a higher one. Steer for this ridge between the two hills, and it will carry you to the passage through the reefs to the anchorage inside. The harbour inside the reefs, is very unsafe and fit only for very small vessels, and the anchorage outside is very insecure, and rocky, bad holding ground: the Ana, French brig of war, about 200 tons, lost an anchor here in the month of January, and damaged another which got foul of the rocks. I observed the French protectorate flag was flying on the island. In rounding south-west Point,

* For a few years past more than 150 sail have annnally touched at Tahiti, They are principally whalemen, whose cruizing grounds lie in the vicinity. The harbour dues going to the Queen, are so high, that they have often been protested against. Jim, I believe, gets five silver dollars for every ship brought in.

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