The Projector: A Collection of Essay, in the Manner of the Spectator, Originally Published Monthly, from Jan. 1802 to Nov. 1809, 3권

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1817
 

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103 페이지 - That not to know at large of things remote From use, obscure and subtle, but to know That which before us lies in daily life, Is the prime wisdom...
22 페이지 - Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear; And chastise with the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crown'd withal.
64 페이지 - ... set their thoughts more on words than things. Nay, because words are many of them learned before the ideas are known for which they stand: therefore some, not only children but men, speak several words no otherwise than parrots do, only because they have learned them, and have been accustomed to those sounds.
225 페이지 - Knowledge and Wisdom, far from being one, Have ofttimes no connection. Knowledge dwells In heads replete with thoughts of other men ; Wisdom in minds attentive to their own.
125 페이지 - The value of every story depends on its being true. A story is a picture either of an individual or of human nature in general : if it be false, it is a picture of nothing.
90 페이지 - In all time of our tribulation; in all time of our wealth ; in the hour of death, and in the day of judgment, Good Lord, deliver us.
171 페이지 - It does not signify," pursued Johnson, "that the fear of something made him resolve; it is upon the state of his mind, after the resolution is taken, that I argue. Suppose a man either from fear, or pride, or conscience, or whatever motive, has resolved to kill himself; when once the resolution is taken he has nothing to fear. He may then go and take the King of Prussia by the nose at the head of his army. He cannot fear the rack who is determined to kill himself.
331 페이지 - There are some things which cannot come under certain rules, but which one would think could not need them. Of this kind are outward civilities and salutations". These one would imagine might be regulated by every man's common sense, without the help of an instructor : but that which we call common sense suffers under that word : for it sometimes implies no more than that faculty which is common to all men, but sometimes signifies right reason, and what all men should consent to. In this latter acceptation...
21 페이지 - LADIES. — The delicate and restrained condition which custom imposes on females, subjects them to great disadvantages. — Mrs. Morris offers to remove them. Ladies or Gentlemen who have formed predilections, may be assisted in obtaining the objects of their affections...
321 페이지 - ... that even death may be induced, by the convulsions of a youthful mind, worked up to a high sense of shame and resentment. The effects of thumping the head, boxing the ears, and pulling the hair, in impairing the intellects, by means of injuries done to the brain, are too obvious to be mentioned. 5. Where there is shame, says Dr. Johnson, there may be virtue.

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