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instances in which that eminent writer has done so, no such facts appear among the printed records which bear that designation. To these brief remarks we will only add, what may serve as a note to the chapter on “ Wills and Administrations,” that a very considerable number of original wills are preserved among the charters in the British Museum, and that in many cases they will also be found among the private evidences of families.

Our opinion of the value of Mr. Grimaldi's labours is, it must be obvious, extremely high ; and our respect for his industry, intelligence, and zea), is proportionate to that opinion. That he will speedily be called upon to publish another edition is unquestionable; and it is under that impression that we entreat him to collect all the additional information in his power, and to revise the style of his work with great care. His modest apology on the subject might be successful in the case of a man of less talent; but such anomalies for example, as saying, “ that time had destroyed all the coffin-plates that was found in the vault,” must have arisen from inattention alone; and therefore they may not be easily excused. An octavo form, and a less price, would act as powerful recommendations to a work which must be useful to every man who is interested in genealogical researches, whether from professional or literary motive3.

A Letter to the Right Hon. the Earl of Aberdeen, K.T., Pre

sident of the Society of Antiquaries, on the Expediency of attaching a Museum of Antiquities to that Institution. Pp. 19.

An effort, on the part of an officer of the Society of Antiquaries, to render that institution of some public utility, is an event so extraordinary, even if it be not wholly unprecedented, that we cannot help entertaining the opinion that it is to the “Retrospective Review" it may be mainly attributed. Not that we assume to ourselves the merit of having in any degree suggested the measure which is advocated. All we claim is the poor virtue of having convinced the most intelligent of the officers of the Society that something more was expected of him than to sit in a certain chair on certain occasions.

This well written pamphlet is the production of Mr. Markland, the Director, to whom we took the liberty of alluding in a very pointed manner in our last number ; and the success which has attended the object of those remarks at once proves their utility, and forms our apology for having so rudely disturbed his tranquillity. Mr. Markland has commenced his “ Letter” by stating, that as he had recently, that is, on the 23rd of April last, been honoured with the appointment of Director of the Society of Antiquaries, he has addressed its President upon a subject which he considers likely to promote those studies for the cultivation of which the Society was incorporated; that it was “ not without reflection and previous discussion with some of the most experienced members that he has come forward; but finding that their opinions strongly coincide with his own, he is encouraged to hope that the object which he has in view will receive the favourable consideration of his Lordship and of the Society at large.”.

The proposition is simply to appropriate one apartment of the Society, as “ a Museum or Repository of Antiquities,” for the reception of remains of “ English antiquities ;” and the learned Director proceeds to show that such was the original intention of the founders of the Society. He then details the advantages that would accrue from it, and the sources whence the materials for such a Museum could probably be derived. If this proposition be received with coldness, it can only arise from the fear that it would regenerate a taste for those useless relics which most people hope has entirely passed away. The brick and mortar antiquaries of the last age have always been objects of ridicule or contempt; for what can be the use of preserving a piece of brass or marble which elucidates nothing, tells nothing, and to which, in many cases, no possible explanation can be given? That it was ancient was a sufficient recommendation to the F.S.A.'s of the last generation; and perhaps enough of the old gentlemen yet remain to render the institution of an hospital for the nourishment of their unfortunate predilections somewhat dangerous. If we could be convinced that nothing would be admitted into the proposed Museum but what was really useful or really beautiful, we should strenuously advocate the adoption of the plan; though at present we are decidedly of opinion that rational antiquarian knowledge -that knowledge which illustrates our history, the manners of the times, and the state of the arts, with all the other objects of useful inquiry--would be a thousand times more advantageously attained by the publication of valuable manuscripts, such, for instance, as are suffered to moulder away in the Society's library, and which never can be rendered useful unless they are printed by that institution.

Thus, then, we rejoice much more at the zeal which this pamphlet indicates, than at the peculiar direction which it has taken ; and though we do not enter so warmly into Mr. Markland's views as many of his confreres of the present Council probably do, we sincerely respect the motives in which his pamphlet has originated, and which augur favourably of his fitness for the situation to which he was so very unexpectedly elected, or, to use the much more appropriate expression adopted by the Director himself, “ appointed.” .

For the Director of the Society of Antiquaries of London, in 1828, Mr. Markland, has asked some very extraordinary questions, and he appears to entertain no less extraordinary ideas. In one place we actually find the following paragraph:

“ It may be asked, how does it happen that, although more than half a century has elapsed since the Society was incorporated, and nearly the same period since it has occupied its present apartments, the nucleus of a collection should barely have been formed?"

To which he answers, that it has arisen from a deficiency of space. We, on the contrary, attribute it, with much more justice, to a want of zeal, to that torpor which now prevails over every thing connected with the Society, and from which it has long been our earnest endeavour to arouse its Fellows. Mr. Markland has ventured to cite the example of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Did he not, as an officer of the Society of Antiquaries of London, blush scarlet at the moment in which he did so? for a comparison of the labours of the two institutions is sufficient to fill all the members of the latter with shame. We do not there find animated mummies consuming about two hundred pounds per annum of its funds ; nor is the direction of its affairs committed to men who are unacquainted with any other manuscripts than their ledgers or their music-books. Its officers are animated by the most honourable zeal to promote a knowledge of the history of their country, instead of by the mere craving after pelf and emolument; and every shilling of its limited funds is appropriated to the objects of the Society, instead of being squandered away in bad engravings, ridiculously high salaries for most trifling services, or in eating and drinking.

CREATIONS OF HONOURS, CHANGES OF NAME, &c.

From the London Gazettes, from November 27th, 1827, to January 25th, 1828.

November 27.-Whitehall, November 26.—The King has been pleased to order a Congé d'élire to pass the Great Seal empowering the Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral Church of Winchester to elect a Bishop of that See, void by the death of Doctor George Pretyman Tomline, late Bishop thereof; and his Majesty has also been pleased to re. commend to the said Dean and Chapter the Right Reverend Father in God Doctor Charles Richard Sumner, now Bishop of Landaff, to be elected by them Bishop of the said See of Winchester.

December 4.-Whitehall, December 3.—The King has been pleased to give and grant unto Ann Rutherford, of the town and county of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Spinster, daughter of Thomas Rutherford, late of the same place, Esq., deceased, by Jane his wife, sister of the late Ralph Atkinson, of Angerton, in the county of Northumberland, and of the said town and county of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Esq., deceased, His royal licence and authority, that she may, in compliance with a clause contained in the last will and testament of the aforesaid Ralph Atkinson, take and use the surname of Atkinson only, and also bear the arms of Atkinson; such arms being first duly exemplified according to the laws of arms, and recorded in the Herald's Office, otherwise the said licence and permission to be void and of none effect: and also to command that the said royal concession and declaration be registered in his Majesty's College of Arms.

December 7.-Whitehall, November 30.-The King has been pleased to give and grant unto Joseph Sawle Sawle, heretofore Joseph Sawle Graves, of Penrice, in the county of Cornwall, Esq., only surviving son and heir of the late Rear-Admiral John Graves, of Barley, in the county of Devon, deceased, by Elizabeth his wife, formerly Elizabeth Sawle, also deceased, His royal licence and authority, that the said Joseph Sawle Sawle, and his issue, may, from a feeling of grateful and affectionate respect for the memory of his late father, the said Rear-Admiral John Graves, take and henceforth use his paternal name of Graves in addition to and before that of Sawle; that he may be called Joseph Sawle Graves Sawle, and that he and his said issue may bear the arms of Graves, quarterly in the second quarter, with the arms of Sawle; such arms being, &c.

December 11.-Whitehall, November 23.-The King has been pleased to give and grant unto Henry Flower, of Hurley, in the county of Bucks, Esq., (commonly called the Honourable Henry Flower), eldest and only surviving son and heir-apparent of the Right Honourable Henry Jeffrey Flower, Viscount Ashbrook, in that part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, called Ireland, by Deborah Susanrah, his late wife, deceased, only child and heiress of the Reverend William Maximilian Freind, late of King's-street, St. James's-square, in the county of Middlesex, Clerk, and of Deborah his wife, who was only child and heiress of Thomas Walker, some time of New Woodstock, in the county of Oxford, Esq., also deceased, His royal licence and authority, that he and his issue may assume and from henceforth use the surname of Walker only, and also bear the arins of Walker, pursuant to a direction and condition contained in the last will and testament of the said Thomas Walker ; such arms being first duly exemplified, &c.

December 14.-Whitehall, December 12. The King has been pleased to order a Congé d'élire to pass the Great Seal empowering the Archdeacon and Chapter of the Cathedral Church of Landaff to elect a Bishop of that See, void by the translation of the Right Reverend Father in God Doctor Charles Richard Sumner, late Bishop thereof, to the See of Winchester; and his Majesty has also been pleased to recommend the Reverend Edward Copleston, Doctor in Divinity, to be elected by them, Bishop of the said See of Landaff.

The King was also pleased to recommend the said Doctor Copleston to be chosen into the place of Dean and Canon Residentiary of the Church of St. Paul, London, the same being void by the translation of Doctor Sumner, late Bishop of Landaff, Dean of St. Paul, to the See of Winchester.

December 18.-St. James's, December 13.- The King having been pleased to nominate and appoint the Right Honourable Frederick James Lamb, his Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of Madrid, to be a Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, his Majesty was this day pleased to confer the honour of Knighthood upon him, and to invest him with the ensigns of a Knight Grand Cross of the said Most Honourable Order.

December 21.-Whitehall, December 19.—The King has been pleased to direct letters patent to be passed under the Great Seal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, for granting the dignity of a Baronet of the said United Kingdom to the follow. ing Gentlemen respectively, and to the heirs male of their bodies lawfully begotten, viz.

Robert Dalrymple Horn Elphinstone, of Horn, and Logie Elphinstone, in the county of Aberdeen, Esq.

Sir Richard Hussey Vivian, of Truro, in the county of Cornwall, Knight Commander of the Most Hon. Military Order of the Bath, and Major-General of his Majesty's forces.

Charles William Taylor, of Hollycombe, in the county of Sussex, Esq.
Uvedale Price, of Foxley, in the county of Hereford, Esq.

Richard Bulkeley Philipps Philipps, of Picton Castle, and of Kilgetty Park, in the county of Pembroke, Esq.

The Honourable Edward Marmaduke Vavasour, of Haslewood, in the county of York.

Robert Tristram Ricketts, of the Elms, in the county of Gloucester, Esq. Captain in the Navy.

Francis Hastings Doyle, Esq. Lieutenant-Colonel in the Army.
John Hutton Cooper, of Walcot, in the county of Somerset, Esq.

Henry Wakeman, of Perdeswell, in the county of Worcester, and of Hinton Hall, in the county of Salop, Esq.

George Philips, of Weston, in the county of Warwick, and of Sedgley, in the county palatine of Lancaster, Esq.

Henry Chamberlain, Esq. his Majesty's Consul-General in the Empire of Brazil.

John Forbes Drummond, of Hawthornden, in the county of Mid Lothian, Esq. Captain in the Navy, and to the heirs male of his body lawfully begotten; and in default of such issue, to Francis Walker Drummond, of Hawthornden, aforesaid, Esq. and his heirs male by Margaret Anne Walker Drummond, his wife, (daughter of the said John Forbes Drummond)'

January 4, 1828.-Whitehall, January 3.- The King has been pleased to direct letters patent to be passed under the Great Seal, nominating, presenting, and appointing the Reverend William Ward, Doctor of Divinity, to the Bishoprick of the Isle of Man and Sodor, void by the translation of Doctor George Murray, late Bishop thereof, to the See of Rochester.

January 8.-Whitehall, January 4.--The King has been pleased to give and grant

... This is taken from the Gazette of December 25, where it was substituted for the notice of Sir John Forbes Drummond's creation in the Gazette of the 21st.

unto William Webb Ward, of the Rock, in the county of Warwick, Esq. His royal licence and authority, that he and his issue may (in compliance with an injunction contained in the last will and testament of Sir William Essington, late of Nottinghamplace, in the county of Middlesex, Knight Commander of the Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath, and Vice-Admiral of the White Squadron of his Majesty's Navy, deceased,) take and henceforth use the surname and bear the arms of Essington only; such arms being, &c.

January 11.-Whitehall, December 17.—The King has been pleased to give and grant unto Major Benjamin Orlando Jones, His royal licence and permission that he may accept and wear the insignia of an Honorary Knight of the Royal Portuguese Order of the Tower and Sword, with which his late Most Faithful Majesty, John the Sixth, King of Portugal, was pleased to honour him, in testimony of his Majesty's approbation of the services rendered by the said Major Benjamin Orlando Jones to the Portuguese government during the Peninsular war; provided nevertheless, that his Majesty's said licence and permission doth not authorise and shall not be deemed or construed to authorise the assumption of any style, appellation, rank, precedence, or privilege, appertaining unto a Knight Bachelor of these realms.

January 18.-Whitehall, January 17.-The King has been pleased to direct letters patent to be passed under the Great Seal, granting the dignity of a Viscountess of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland unto Joan Canning, widow of the Right Honourable George Canning, deceased, by the name, style, and title of Viscountess Canning, of Kilbrahian, in the county of Kilkenny; and, at'her decease, the dignity of a Viscount of the said United Kingdom to the heirs male of her body by the said George Canning, by the name, style, and title of Viscount Canning, of Kilbrahan, in the said county of Kilkenny.

The King has also been pleased to direct letters patent to be passed under the Great Seal, granting the dignity of a Baron of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland unto the following persons, and the heirs male of their respective bodies lawfully begotten, viz.

The Right Honourable Sir Henry Wellesley, G. C. B., by the name, style, and title of Baron Cowley, of Wellesley, in the county of Somerset.

The Right Honourable Sir Charles Stuart, G. C. B., by the name, style, and title of Baron Stuart de Rothesay, of the Isle of Bute'.

The Right Honourable Sir William A'Court, Baronet, G. C. B., by the name, style, and title of Baron Heytesbury, of Heytesbury, in the county of Wilts.

The Right Honourable Archibald John, Earl of Rosebery, by the namo, style, and title of Baron Rosebery, of Rosebery, in the county of Edinburgh.

The Right Honourable Richard Earl of Clanwilliam, by the name, style, and title of Baron Clanwilliam, in the county of Tipperary.

John George Lambton, Esq., by the name, style, and title of Baron Durham, of the city of Durham, and of Lambton Castle, in the county palatine of Durham 3.

1 The designation of “Rothesay" has been adopted in commemoration of his Lord. ship's descent from James Stuart, Heritable Sheriff of Bute, who, by a Royal Charter of King James IV. anno 1498, was constituted Constable of Rothesay Castle; and the said office was enjoyed by his immediate descendants. The castle of Rothesay is now part of the patrimonial possessions of the chief of this noble family, the present Marquess of Bute.

i Lord Heytesbury's title is derived from the Manor of Heytesbury, which is now in his Lordship's possession.

3 As the newspapers have indulged in some absurd observations relative to his Lordship's family and title, we are induced to state a few facts on the subject of both. The family of Lambton, of which Lord Durham is the representative, have held the Manor of Lambton from the earliest period of which any records of it are preserved ; and in 1314 it was possessed by his immediate ancestor, Robert de Lambton. Besides having intermarried with the most distinguished families in the county of Durham, its members have generally represented either the county or city from the time when the elective franchise was first conferred upon those places; which circumstances, added to the long enjoyment of considerable local influence in Durham, induced his Lordship

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