페이지 이미지
PDF
ePub

declaration, or remonstrance, how the French have made the first breaches, so forced him to war ; that he has declared; but I do not find that the Swede joins yet with the French. The Lady Northumberlands have met at Northumberland House, After some propositions offered by my sister to the other, which were discoursed yesterday before my Lord Chancellor, between the elder lady and Mr. Montagu, Lord Suffolk by; my sister offers to deliver up the child, upon condition she will promise she shall have her on a visit for ten days or a month sometimes, and that she will enter into bonds not to marry the child without the mother's consent, nor till she is of years of consent; and, or her part, Mr. Montagu and she will enter into the same bonds, that when she is with them, or at no time, they will marry or contract any marriage for her, without the grandmother's consent; but she was stout yesterday, and would not hear patiently ; yet went to Northumberland House, and gave my sister a visit. I hope for an accommodation. My sister urges it is hard her child (that if she has no other children must be her heir) should be disposed of without her consent; and in my judgment it is hard ; yet I fancy I am not very apt to be partial. If the weather be with you as it is with us, there never was a more dismal time for the country; it is happy you have some society besides hawks. I hope Friday will bring the chiefest desire in the world by your

R. VAUGHAN, My Lady Bellasys is going to France for a consumption.

VOL. V.

LADY R. VAUGHAN TO MR. RUSSELL.

London, 1675. The few hours we have been parted seem too many to me, to let this first post night pass, without giving my dear man a little talk, which must be an account how I have spent my time; for intelligence I have none, and my heart and thoughts are all known to Mr. Russell. Therefore, to return to my present design, I am to tell you, though I intended to dine where I am now, at Leicester House, yet your father coming to see our miss (their eldest child ) carried me to dinner to Bedford House to eat Devonshire fish, and after wanting gamesters, I must play one hour ; but before I had done one quarter, Lord Suffolk came, and I desired to resign to him, having won my lord five pounds and myself thirty shillings; so I came to my sister, and found her in great trouble, the child seeming indeed to be very ill, and the doctor directing a vomit, and whilst it was getting ready he went to see my Lady Jones' children, and whilst he was there her youngest boy died, played with him when he came in, and only flushed in his face and died instantly. My sister's girl is better to-day ; our's fetched but one sleep last night, and was very good this morning. My Lord Stamford left his wife this morning at four o'clock, and is gone to his uncle Gray. This Mr. Darcy told me this morning ; but you will suppose I have not bettered my information since, being at this day at Leicester House ; the Lord Huntington's is a

better fortune than he was by the death of the Lord Stanhope, 15001. a year coming to him. Mr. Grimes, that was at Wickham, was married yesterday to Dol. Howard, the maid of honour. Madam Mazarin is not arrived yet; but I hear Madam Tremblet is. My uncle told Sir Harry Vernon yesterday he was une des incurables.

If you are not mightily delighted, I hope you will not stay the longest of your time from your

R. VAUGHAN.

The doctor presents his services to you. He has been to see the child. No city news, he says; but the monied men likely to be undone again, all calling in their money, and they not able to pay so suddenly.

Harry Saville is in a kind of disgrace with the duke of York). When the king dined at the duke of Albermarle's, after dinner, the duke, talking to Saville, asked if he meant not to invite the king to the business of the day. Saville wondered what he meant. The duke told him he need not ; for sure it was his constant endeavour to get the king to drink more than any that wished him well would do. Saville denied it. “ Then go away,” replies the other; so he did. And the next day, the king reproaching him for not staying, he told the occasion; so there is great anger. I write in the nursery, and Lady Harvey is just rushed by, and no sister at home; so I may be engaged, but I think not, for she is started back again, a perfect vision! I am going to see poor Lady Jones.

LADY R. VAUGHAN TO MR. RUSSELL.

EVERY new promise of Mr. Russell's unalterable kindness is a most unspeakable delight to my thoughts; therefore I need use no more words to tell you how welcome your letter was to me; but how much welcomer Monday will be, I hope you do imagine. Your father sent me the inclosed, but says withal, that the news at court from France this morning was, Messina was relieved. For weddings and deaths, and that sort of news, I know not the least. Her grace of Cleveland has set the day for France to be within ten days. The duchess of Portsmouth is melancholy, as some persons will have it, and with reason. You will easily conclude your sister Allington is so, when I tell you her boy has the measles; he had a cough two or three days, but was so well, she was with him in the Park last night, and this morning the measles appeared ; but I hear nothing but he is very well with them ; the doctor sees no ill symptom at all. Our girl is as you left her, I bless the mercy of God for it. I have silently retired to my little dressing room for this performance, the next being full of company at cards. The Lady Pultney one, introduced by Lady Southampton. I am engaged with Northumberland (her sister); but at nothing, nor to nothing upon earth entirely, but to my dear Mr. Russell, his I am with most passionate affec

R. VAUGHAN.
I am an humble servant to all your company.

tion,

LADY R. VAUGHAN TO MR. RUSSELL.

Stratton, 24th August, 1676. You bid me write to you on Thursday, but civility obliged me to that to answer yours, so that this is to show my obedience to your orders, and a little indulgence to my own self; since I do love to talk any way with Mr. Russell, though he does abuse poor me sometimes. You had like to have vexed me bravely by Jack Vaughan's letter, I was putting that up in my pocket to read two or three days after at leisure; I saw you had opened it, but as it was going up, finding one in it, it came in mind if he should have put in one, it inight be for a trick, how it would vex me! so broke your seal, and was very happy by doing so. Oh, my best life, how long I think it since we were together! I can forgive you if you do not do so, upon condition you do not stay too long away. Your coach, by the grace of God, shall be at Bagshot on Wednesday night; and on Thursday will, I hope, bring my wishes to me. I know nothing there is to give you notice of from hence. The joiners will end their work to-day in the new room. There is no coping bricks till Monday: nor till you come to her, no entire satisfaction in the heart of your affectionate

R. VAUGHAN.

« 이전계속 »