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ST. CHRYSOSTOM ON FATNESS.

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beauty, and unquestionably far more common in the young. Even in the days of St. Chrysostom, the question how to grow stouter” appears to have been one anxiously considered by the ladies of Antioch, where the good father preached. He was not in the least inclined to indorse this vanity, and told them one day in his sermon, that “the virtue of the body does not consist in fatness, but in the capacity of bearing torments." We do not think that in this day of wasplike waists and tight laced figures the Saint's words would be appropriate.

Leanness like corpulence is often a family trait, and is much more frequently than that condition associated with disease. We may lay it down as a rule that when a person in seemingly good health commences to fall away in flesh, there is some lurking disorder of the nutritive system at work. Three times out of four this disorder will be found in the liver or stomach, and if taken in hand early, and treated wisely and energetically, not only will good looks but health also be rescued.

In quite a number of spare women, marriage has a singularly beneficial influence. They improve rapidly in flesh and in color. But no woman need marry

for this object. We can promise her a comfortable plumpness without recourse to so risky a remedy. We explained a few pages back that some articles of food made much more fat than others. Let her live on

these, and that she may do so the more readily, here is a

BILL OF FARE TO INCREASE IN FLESH,

Breakfast (8 to 10 A. M.). Bacon, ham, sausage, pork steak, mutton or veal, with rich gravies.

Fresh fish, especially eels, catfish, trout, or salmon.
The yelks of eggs, fried, scrambled or dropped.

Buckwheat, Indian, or wheaten cakes, with plenty of butter and molasses, syrup, honey, or sugar. Fresh bread and butter.

Fried or boiled mush or grits, with butter, sugar, cream, or syrup. Fried or boiled potatoes.

Fresh milk, plain or sweetened, warm or cool, chocolate, cocoa, or coffee, with plenty of cream and sugar.

Lunch (about noon). Eggs and milk, or fresh milk, with sweet cake, preserves, jellies, honey, bread and butter.

Dinner (about 3 P. M.).
Soup-Gumbo, okra, calf's head, mock turtle, sago.

Fish-Salmon, eels, catfish, trout, with dressing of drawn butter or cream.

Meats-Roast pig or roast pork, lamb with guava or currant jelly, fried bacon, boiled pork, roast lamb or beef (fat), roast or fried veal.

Vegetables—Ruta-baga turnips, sugar-beets, potatoes (roast or mashed with cream), parsnips, carrots, green peas and corn, salad with cream dressing, grits, rice, macaroni, vermicelli.

Dessert-Suet pudding with cream dip, tapioca or starch

THE MOST FATTENING DIETS.

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pudding, arrowroot, sago, cream cakes, meringues, custards, sweetmeats, honey, nuts, bananas, sweet grapes, pastry, ice

cream.

Milk or cream.

Supper (about 7 P. M.). Bread and butter, or bread and milk, with preserves, jams, or syrup, oatmeal porridge. Mush with milk or molasses. Cold bacon or mutton.

Milk sweetened or plain. Tea with cream and sugar.

Every person must watch and weigh himself, and thus learn what articles of diet are in his individual case most fattening. Mr. Banting found from his experience that to him sugar was the most productive of fat. If he ate five ounces of it, he increased one pound! Dr. Stark, likewise speaking from his own knowledge, declares in favor of suet as that which fleshed him most rapidly. Another high authority says that milk, especially when taken fresh and from an Alderney cow, is superior to anything else. If one can drink three or four pints of it a day, an increase in weight is as certain, and perhaps more certain, than by swallowing cod-liver oil. Starch in the form of arrowroot, sago, tapioca, or farina, is equally lauded by others.

To be avoided on the other hand are: pickles, vinegars, highly spiced food, sour wines or fruits, acid vegetables.

To decrease in size a diet chiefly animal is required;

to increase, a diet largely vegetable is most efficient. Of vegetables, the roots are as a rule fattening, while those which ripen above ground have not such an effect.

There is no need to stuff one's self with these appetizing dishes. Remember it is not the quantity but the kind of food, and its ready conversion into flesh that are demanded. It is essential that the digestion be kept in perfect order, therefore an overloaded stomach is a positive injury.

In some parts of Asia, where a considerable embonpoint is deemed essential to beauty, the art of fattening damsels “for the trade” has been carried to a high degree of perfection. They sleep long and late on soft beds, and they avoid violent exercise or disturbing thoughts. They bathe in lukewarm water, and take while in the bath a broth made from fat chickens boiled with rice or with arrowroot. On leaving the water they are softly rubbed down with scented vegetable oils, such as pure olive oil boiled with

gum benzoin, which not only preserves it from rancidity but imparts to it a rich aroma. The oil prevents the watery fluid from passing out in the perspiration, and softens the outer layer of the skin. They drink mode rately of a sweet mixture of honey and water, and take daily a preparation of the castor bean, which slightly moves the bowels and increases the appetite.

All these details are not applicable with us, but this

HYGIENIC HINTS.

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is the true method to pursue. Irregular hours of rest or for meals, eating between meals, anxiety, overwork, severe exercise, these are sure to maintain a condition of leanness.

As for the various drugs which have been suggested, their use had better be confined to simply maintaining the regularity of the natural functions. Some of the mineral waters of Germany and our own country have acquired a reputation for increasing the flesh, probably owing to the fillip they give .to the digestion. These are Toplitz, Gastein, and Landeck, in Germany, and the White Sulphur and chalybeate springs in this country.

There is danger that such a bill of fare as this latter may make some people “bilious,” and others gouty, if long persisted in. These tendencies may be combated by a careful attention to the regularity of the functions of the body. A glass of Congress or Bedford water, every morning before breakfast, is a salutary draught in the former case, and in the latter an equal amount of Gettysburg water will be found of service. The latter contains, it is said, a small quantity of the substance lithia, from which it derives its virtues.

Any one will more willingly run these dangers of over-feeding than adopt the method of increasing flesh recommended by Galen and some other physicians of the olden time. This was nothing more nor less than

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