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until they reached that portion of the building which was set apart for the residence of the governor, who, with a kind forethought that few would have expected to meet in such a functionary, had already removed the unfortunate Mordaunt to a more cheerful domicile, under his own roof, until he should be legally set at liberty by an order from the Home Office.

Walter's heart beat fast and hurriedly, and a film seemed gathered over his eyes, as the door opened, and some one-everything seemed so confused and incoherent, that he could neither distinguish form nor fcature,-tottered feebly up, and, throwing himself upon his neck, burst into tears, murmuring, “My son ! my son! Oh, that I should meet you at last, and in such a situation !" The

young man's tears were flowing as fast as the winter's rain, all this time, as he pressed that wasted and world-worn form convulsively to his heart, whilst the elder Mordaunt went

on :

“Many a long year, my dear, dear boy, have I pictured to myself, when thousands of miles of ocean rolled between us, our first meeting; and that it should be thus at last,” he cried, glancing down to the vile dress he wore. Do you know that they suspect me of murder, my boy ?”

Walter looked up: there was something so bright and beautiful in his handsome countenance as he did so, that even the elder Mordaunt caught his hopefulness as he gazed upon it; and then, in a hurried voice, that was almost at times inaudible through agitation, he made his father acquainted with all that had happened with respect to Pestlepolge, who, as he informed him, was actually lodged under the same roof as himself, charged by Shadrach Abednego, the Jew, with the murder of his miserable old dupe, and who would, ere long, be placed upon his trial, to answer for his crime.

The sudden news almost was too much for the shattered nerves of Mr. Mordaunt, who, at first, listened, with Walter's hand locked in his own, quite bewildered at the turn affairs had so suddenly taken; at length, however, his naturally strong intellect resumed its sway, and he soon glided insensibly into conversation with Walter, asking him many questions as to his early life and pursuits, although the latter did not fail to notice that he most carefully avoided any allusion to old Marmaduke Hutton whatever.

As the hour for departing had long since passed, Walter was suffered by the governor to occupy the same room with his father, who, as if he never would tire of hearing his son speak, remained up until a very late hour, engaged in eager conversation. At length, however, nature resumed her sway, and the pair, with thankful hearts, laid their heads upon their only pillows, and one, at least, was soon buried in forgetfulness.

The news of the capture of Pestlepolge, and the presumptive evidence this event afforded of the innocence of Mr. Mordaunt, spread like wildfire through the country. Few came to condole with the miserable being whose life would so soon be justly forfeited to the laws of his country, but overwhelming were the crowds that presented themselves at the castle gates, to congratulate Mr. Mordaunt at once, upon his return to his native country, and his happy escape from the ignominious death that threatened him. One answer was, however, returned to all, Mr. Mordaunt was in delicate health ; and his enthusiastic friends all went away as curious as they came.

Two beings, however, did call upon the miserable Pestlepolge —a woman and a man—and were with him for many hours. His scarcely less miserable daughter had, on receiving the first tidings of the affair, gone over to Hereford with Dr. Yellowchops —now, alas, too truly an abject, crest-fallen being; and although her wretched parent had, at first, refused to see her, he was at last so wearied out with her importunities, as to consent to see her once more, and once only, as the message he sent her, appointing the interview, notified. Well

as he understood the peculiar temper of his wife, Dr. Yellowchops, though absorbed in his own miseries, could not but remark how utterly changed and softened down she was, on the morning when his degraded father-in-law had sent to say that he would see them. She was up and at her prayers when he awoken-her tears were falling fast all through the breakfast time, and never one bite passed her lips as she sate over against him, at the table. When she came down again, ready dressed to go in deep mourning; her manner, which had been meek and subdued until now, seemed to have changed again to its usual cold, hard impenetrability ; and though she never spoke nor looked at him, he could see, by the convulsive twitching of her thin, sharp lips, that there was an under-current of agitation running beneath all this calmness.

They got into the coach, and drove to the jail. Mrs. Yellowchops, sitting with her heavy, black veil down, hiding her face even from him; and all the way as they went, the doctor kept wishing that the interview was over, for he had a natural dread of his father-in-law at all times, and this feeling was not by any means weakened by the recent disclosures.

They got to the jail at last, and the doctor handed his wife out, and led her up the steps, at the top of which they were met by a turnkey, who, with professional indifference, handed them off at once to the cell where Pestlepolge was confined, and which was a very dark, damp, gloomy kind of a cell indeed, and not, until they reached that portion of the building which was set apart for the residence of the governor, who, with a kind forethought that few would have expected to meet in such a functionary, had already removed the unfortunate Mordaunt to a more cheerful domicile, under his own roof, until he should be legally set at liberty by an order from the Home Office.

Walter's heart beat fast and hurriedly, and a film seemed gathered over his eyes, as the door opened, and some one-everything seemed so confused and incoherent, that he could neither distinguish form nor feature,-tottered feebly up, and, throwing himself upon his neck, burst into tears, murmuring, “My son! my son! Oh, that I should meet you at last, and in such a situation !

The young man's tears were flowing as fast as the winter's rain, all this time, as he pressed that wasted and world-worn form convulsively to his heart, whilst the elder Mordaunt went

on :

- Do you

“Many a long year, my dear, dear boy, have I pictured to myself, when thousands of miles of ocean rolled between us, our first meeting; and that it should be thus at last," he cried, glancing down to the vile dress he wore.

know that they suspect me of murder, my boy?”

Walter looked up: there was something so bright and beautiful in his handsome countenance as he did so, that even the elder Mordaunt caught his hopefulness as he gazed upon it; and then, in a hurried voice, that was almost at times inaudible through agitation, he made his father acquainted with all that had happened with respect to Pestlepolge, who, as he informed him, was actually lodged under the same roof as himself, charged by Shadrach Abednego, the Jew, with the murder of his miserable old dupe, and who would, ere long, be placed upon his trial, to answer for his crime.

The sudden news almost was too much for the shattered nerves of Mr. Mordaunt, who, at first, listened, with Walter's hand locked in his own, quite bewildered at the turn affairs had so suddenly taken; at length, however, his naturally strong intellect resumed its sway, and he soon glided insensibly into conversation with Walter, asking him many questions as to his early life and pursuits, although the latter did not fail to notice that he most carefully avoided any allusion to old Marmaduke Hutton whatever.

As the hour for departing had long since passed, Walter was suffered by the governor to occupy the same room with his father, who, as if he never would tire of hearing his son speak, remained up until a very late hour, engaged in eager conversation. At length, however, nature resumed her sway, and the pair, with thankful hearts, laid their heads upon their only pillows, and one, at least, was soon buried in forgetfulness.

The news of the capture of Pestlepolge, and the presumptive evidence this event afforded of the innocence of Mr. Mordaunt, spread like wildfire through the country. Few came to condole with the miserable being whose life would so soon be justly forfeited to the laws of his country, but overwhelming were the crowds that presented themselves at the castle gates, to congratulate Mr. Mordaunt at once, upon his return to his native country, and his happy escape from the ignominious death that threatened him. One answer was, however, returned to all, Mr. Mordaunt was in delicate health; and his enthusiastic friends all went away as curious as they came.

Two beings, however, did call upon the miserable Pestlepolge a woman and a man-and were with him for many hours. His scarcely less miserable daughter had, on receiving the first tidings of the affair, gone over to Hereford with Dr. Yellowchops -now, alas, too truly an abject, crest-fallen being; and although her wretched parent had, at first, refused to see her, he was at last so wearied out with her importunities, as to consent to see her once more, and once only, as the message he sent her, appointing the interview, notified.

Well as he understood the peculiar temper of his wife, Dr. Yellowchops, though absorbed in his own miseries, could not but remark how utterly changed and softened down she was, on the morning when his degraded father-in-law had sent to say that he would see them. She was up and at her prayers when he awoke,,her tears were falling fast all through the breakfast time, and never one bite passed her lips as she sate over against him, at the table. When she came down again, ready dressed to go in deep mourning; her manner, which had been meek and subdued until now, seemed to have changed again to its usual cold, hard impenetrability; and though she never spoke nor looked at him, he could see, by the convulsive twitching of her thin, sharp lips, that there was an under-current of agitation running beneath all this calmness.

They got into the coach, and drove to the jail. Mrs. Yellowchops, sitting with her heavy, black veil down, hiding her face even from him; and all the way as they went, the doctor kept wishing that the interview was over, for he had a natural dread of his father-in-law at all times, and this feeling was not by any means weakened by the recent disclosures.

They got to the jail at last, and the doctor handed his wife out, and led her up the steps, at the top of which they were met by a turnkey, who, with professional indifference, handed them off at once to the cell where Pestlepolge was confined, and which was a very dark, damp, gloomy kind of a cell indeed, and not, by any means, the place that gentleman would have selected, had he had the option of doing so.

The gloomy appearance of the place, and the dark figure siting listlessly on the iron bedstead,—the only article of furniture it contained, frightened the doctor so much, that when the turnkey said coarsely, “Come, you must look alive there now, and don't be long about it, ma'am," and then prepared to leave the prisoner and his visitors to themselves, Yellowchops involuntariIy wheeled round, and followed the keeper into the passage, where the pair took up their position, one on each side of the door, to await the exit of Mrs. Yellowchops.

They had not sate here long when a hubbub was heard below, and, presently, two or three of the prison functionaries were seen approaching, leading in another gentleman, who had evidently come for the benefit of the change of air, to that salubrious mansion, at the pressing entreaty of the high sheriff of Herefordshire. This gentleman, Doctor Yellowchops recognised, on his approaching, to be no other than Shadrach the Jew, whom the authorities, having taken down his depositions, bad committed to the same asylum as his friend, and accomplice in guilt, to be in readiness when wanted.

“It ish Doctor Yellowchops !" he cried, struggling in the grasp of the official who accompanied him, as soon as he

recognised our worthy friend ; "he ish the son-in-law of the villain that strangled poor Mishter Huttonsh; your servant, doctor."

Come, come, my good fellow, move on, will you," said the turnkey, surlily; "you can see the gemman doesn't want to have anything to say to the likes of you,-come siep out there, Mister Abednego.”

“And so I will, friend," retorted Shadrach, with a malignant scowl; “won't you allow a shentleman to speak to his friends ?”

“ When he meets them, of course I will, retorted the other, gruffly; "especially if the pleasure is mutual, which it is not, in the present case; so be moving, now," and without further ceremony, he dragged forward the unwilling Shadrach, who pro. tested against this ignominous proceeding as long as he remained in hearing

Of all that passed within that dark and gloomy cell we forbear to trace the record ; at times those without, caught an angry word, or a smothered sob, but beyond that, nothing was ever known, even by Doctor Yellowchops, of what occurred during the long and dreary hours, that were spent by him without its walls. Towards the middle of the afternoon, the gaunt, and repelling figure of Mrs. Yellowchops appeared at the door, and placing a sovereign in the hand of the attendant, motioned the doctor to lead the way out, keeping herself closely veiled as she

had come.

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