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EARL OF DORSET,

377 Of Modesty, opposed to Ambition,

410

Song-Dorinda's sparkling wit and eyes),

377 Thomas FULLER,

411

Song–To all you ladies now at land),

377 The Good Schoolmaster,

412

DUKE OF BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, •

378 Recreation,

413

Extract from the Essay on Poetry,

378 Books,

413

Education confined too much to Language,

413

DRAMATISTS.

Rules for Improving the Memory,

413

Jorn DRYDEN,

379 Terrors of a Guilty Conscience,

414

Savage Freedom,

381 Marriage,

414

Love and Beauty,

381 Conversation,

414

Midnight Repose,

381 Domestic Economy,

414

Tears,

381 Miscellaneous Aphorisms,

415

Mankind,

381 Izaak WALTON,

415

Fear of Death,

381 The Angler's Wish,

417

Lore Anticipated after Death,

381 Thankfulness for Worldly Blessings,

417

Adam after the Fall,

381 John EVELYN,

419

Scene between Mark Antony and Ventidius, his general, 382 The Great Fire in London,

420

Scene between Dorax and Sebastian,

384 A Fortunate Courtier not Envied,

421

Thomas OTWAY,

386 Evelyn's Account of his Daughter Mary,

422

Seenes from Venice Preserved,

387 Fashions in Dress,

423

Parting,

390 SIR ROGER L'ESTRANGE,

423

Picture of a Witch,

390 Æsop's Invention to bring his Mistress back again to her

Description of Morning,

390 Husband after she had left him,

424

Killing a Boar,

390 The Popish Plot,

424

NATHANIEL LEE,

390 Ingratitude,

425

Scene between Brutus and Titus, his son,

891 DR RALPH CUDWORTH,

425

Self-Murder,

392 God, though Incomprehensible, not Inconceivable, 426

Joes CROWNE,

392 Difficulty of Convincing Interested Unbelievers,

427

Extract from Thyestes,

392 Creation,

427

Wishes for Obscurity,

392 DR RICHARD CUMBERLAND,

427

Passions,

392 The Tabernacle and Temple of the Jews,

427

Love in Women,

392 Dr Isaac Barrow,

428

Inconstancy of the Multitude,

392 The Excellency of the Christian Religion,

429

Warriors,

392 What is Wit?

431

Tronas SHADWELL-SIR GEORGE ETHEREGE-WILLIAM Wise Selection of Pleasures,

431

WYCH ERLEY-MRS APARA BEAN,

392 Grief Controlled by Wisdom,

431

Scene from Sir George Etherege's Comical Revenge, 393

Honour to God,

432

Bong- Love in fantastio triumph sat),

393 The Goodness of God,

432

MISCELLANEOUS PIECES OF THE FOURTH PERIOD, 393 Charity,

432

Hallo my Fancy,

393 Concord and Discord,

432

Alas, poor Scholar! whither wilt thou go?

395 Industry,

433

The Fairy Queen, .

396 JOHN TILLOTSON,

434

Advantages of Truth and Sincerity,

434

PROSE WRITERS.

Virtue and Vice Declared by the General Vote of Man-

MILTON,

396 kind,

435

Milton's Literary Musings,

397 Evidence of a Creator in the Structure of the World, 436

Education,

398 Sin and Holiness,

436

Liberty of the Press,

399 Resolution necessary in forsaking Vice,

436

The Reformation,

400

Singularity,

436

Truth,

400 Commencement of a Vicious Course,

436

Expiration of the Roman Power in Britain,

The Moral Feelings Instinctive,

436

ABRAHAM COWLEY,

Spiritual Pride,

of Myself,

Education,

Poetry and Poets,

402

EDWARD STILLINGELBET,

Of Obscurity,

403 True Wisdom,

Of Procrastination,

403 Immoderate Self-Love,

438

Vision of Oliver Cromwell,

403 DR WILLIAM SHERLOCK,

438

JAMES HARRINGTON,

404 Longing after Immortality,

439

ALGERNON SIDNEY,

406 Life not too short,

439

Liberty and Government,

406 Advantages of our Ignorance of the Time of Death, 440

LADY RACHEL RUSSELL,

406 | DR ROBERT SOUTH,

440

To Dr Fitzwilliam-On her Sorrow,

407 The Will for the Deed,

442

To the Earl of Galvay-On Friendship,

407 Ill-natured and Good-natured Men,

443

To Dr Fitzwilliam-Domestic Misfortunes,

407 The Glory of the Clergy,

444

To Lord Carendish-Bereavement,

408 The Pleasures of Amusement and Industry Compared, 444

SAMUEL BUTLER,

408 Hypocritical Sanctimony,

444

A Small Poet,

408 Ignorance in Power,

444

A Vintner,

409 Religion not Hostile to Pleasure,

445

A Prater,

409 Labour overcomes Apparent Impossibilities,

445

An Antiquary,

409 Ingratitude an Incurable Vice,

445

WALTER CHARLETON,

409 Dr John WILKINS,

446

The Ready and Nimblo Wit,

409 How a Man may Fly to the Moon,

7

The Slow but Sure Wit,

410 | Dr John PEARSON,

447

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The Resurrection,

477 Sir MATTHEW HALE,

507

DR THOMAS SPRAT,

448 On Conversation,

View of the Divine Government afforded by Experimental Јону Lоски, ,

508

Philosophy,

448 Causes of Weakness in Men's Understandings,

512

Cowley's Love of Retirement,

449 Practice and Habit,

512

DR THOMAS BURNET,

450 Prejudices, .

B13

The final Conflagration of the Globe,

451 Injudicious Haste in Study,

513

Rebuke of Human Pride,

451 Pleasure and Pain,

514

The Dry Bed of the Ocean,

452

Importance of Moral Education,

515

Dr HENRY MORE,

452 Fading of Ideas from the Mind,

515

The Squl and Body,

453 History,

515

Devout Contemplation of the Works of God,

453 Orthodoxy and Heresy,

515

Nature of the Evidence of the Existence of God,

453 Disputation,

516

RICHARD BAXTER,

454 Liberty,

616

Fruits of Experience of Human Character,

454 Opposition to New Doctrines, •

516

Baxter's Judgment of his Writings,

454 Duty of Preserving Health,

516

Desire of Approbation,

455 Toleration of Other Men's Opinions,

516

Change in Baxter's Estimate of his own and other Men's The HONOURABLE ROBERT BOYLE,

516

Knowledge,

455

The Study of Natural Philosophy favourable to Religion, 517

On the Credit due to Hlistory,

456 Reflection upon a Lanthorn and Candle, carried by on

Character of Sir Matthew Hale,

456 a Windy Night,

518

Observance of the Sabbath in Baxter's Youth,

457 Upon the sight of Roses and Tulips growing near one

Theological Controversies,

457

another,

518

JOHN OWEN,

457 Marriage a Lottery,

519

EDMUND CALAMY,

458 Some Considerations Touching the Style of the Holy

JOIN FLAVEL,

458

Scriptures,

519

458

Against Repining in the Season of Want,

SIR ISAAC NEWTON,

520

MATTHEW HENRY,

458

The Prophetic Language,

521

GEORGE Fox,

458 John RAY,

524

Fox's Ill-treatment at Ulverstone,

459 The Study of Nature Recommended,

524

Interview with Oliver Cromwell,

459 Proportionate Lengths of the Necks and Legs of Ani-

ROBERT BARCLAY,

461 mals,

525

Against Titles of Honour,

462 God's Exhortation to Activity,

525

WILLIAM PENN,

463 All Things not Made for Man,

526

Against the Pride of Noble Birth,

463 THOMAS STANLEY-SIR WILLIAM DUGDALE-ANTHONY

Penn's Advice to his children,

464

Wood-ELIAS ASHMOLE JOAN AUBREY-THOMAS

THONAN ELLWOOD,

465

RYMER,

527

Ellwood's Intercourse with Milton,

465 Tom D'URFEY AND TOM BROWN,

527

John BUNYAN,

466

Letter from Scarron in the Next World to Louis XIV., 528

Extracts from Bunyan's Autobiography,

467

An Exhortatory Letter to an Old Lady that Smoked

Christian in the lands of Giant Despair,

471

Tobacco,

529

The Golden City,

473 An Indian's Account of a London Gaming-House, 529

LORD CLARENDON,

475 Laconics, or New Maxims of State and Conversation, 529

Reception of the Liturgy at Edinburgh in 1637,

477 SIR GEORGE MACKENZIE,

530

Character of Hampden,

477 Praise of a Country Life,

Character of Falkland,

478

Against Envy,

531

Character of Charles I., ,

479 Fame,

531

Escape of Charles II. after the Battle of Worcester, 480

Bigotry,

531

Character of Oliver Cromwell,

485 Virtue more Pleasant than Vice,

532

BULSTRODE WHITELOCKE,

485

Avarice,

GILBERT BURNET,

486 The True Path to Esteem,

683

Death and Character of Edward VI.,

487 NEWSPAPERS IN ENGLAND,

833

Character of Leighton, Bishop of Dumblane-His Death, 488

Character of Charles II.,

489

The Czar Peter in England in 1698,

490

Character of William III.,

491

John DRYDEN,

492

Fifth Períod.

Shakspeare,

493

Beaumont and Fletcher,

493 REIGNS OF WILLIAM III., ANNE, AND GEORGB I.

Ben Jonson,

493

[1689 to 1727.]

Improved Style of Dramatic Dialogue after the Restora-

tion,

494

POETS.

Translations of the Ancient Poets,

494

535

Spenser and Milton,

496 MATTHEW PRIOR,

Lampoon,

497

896

For my Own Monument,

497

Dryden's Translation of Virgil,

836

Epitaph Extempore,

History and Biography,

498 An Epitaph,

536

SIR WILLIAM TEMPLE,

500 The Garland,

536

Against Excessive Grief,

502 Abra's Love for Solomon,

537

Right of Private Judgment in Religion,

504 The Thief and the Cordelier A Ballad,

Poetical Genius,

504 The Cameleon,

538

WILLIAM WOTTON,

506 Protogenes and Apelles,

639

Decline of Pedantry in England,

507 Richard's Theory of the Mind,

530

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JOSEPR ADDISON,

540 Picture of the Life of a Woman of Fashion,

698

From the Letter from Italy,

843 Fable,

598

Ode How are thy servants blest, O Lord I)

343 GEORGE PARQUHAR,

598

Ode The spacious firmament on high),

543 Humorous Scene at an Inn,

599

The Battle of Blenheim,

544 From the Recruiting Officer,

600

From the Tragedy of Cato,

544

JONATHAN SWIFT,

545

ESBAYISTS.

A Description of the Morning,

548

A Description of a City Shower,

548 SIR RICHARD STEELE-JOSEPH ADDISON,

602

Baucis and Philemon,

548 Agreeable Companions and Flatterers,

606

Verses on his own Death,

349 Quack Advertisements,

607

The Grand Question Debated,

552 Story-Telling,

608

ALEXANDER POPE,

553

The Political Upholsterer,

609

The Messiah,

657 The Vision of Mirza,

610

The Toilet,

558 Sir Roger De Coverley's Visit to Westminster Abbey, 611

Description of Belinda and the Sylphs,

558 The Works of Creation,

612

From the Epistle of Eloisa to Abelard,

559 EUSTACE BUDGELL,

614

Elegy on an Unfortunate Lady,

560 The Art of Growing Rich,

614

Happiness Depends not on Goods, but on Virtue, 561

John HUGHES,

615

From the Prologue to the Satires, addressed to Arbuth- Ambition,

615

not,

863

The Man of Ross,

564

The Dying Christian to his soul,

565

MISCELLANEOUS WRITERS.

Toomas TICKELL,

586

Colin and Lucy- Ballad,

566 DANIEL DEFOE,

617

StR SAMUEL GARTH,

567 A True Relation of the Apparition of one Mrs Veal, the

BIR RICHARD BLACKMORR,

668 next day after her Death, to one Mrs Bargrave, at
AMBROSE Ppilips,

869 Canterbury, the eight of September, 1705, which ap-

Epistle to the Earl of Dorset,

569 parition recommends the perusal of Drelincourt's Book

The First Pastoral,

569 of Consolations against the fears of Death,

618

Joux GAY,

570 The Great Plague in London,

621

The Country Ballad Singer,

572 The Troubles of a Young Thief,

Walking the Streets of London,

573

Advice to a Youth of Rambling Disposition,

623

Bong - Sweet woman is like the fair flower in its BERNARD MANDEVILLE,

624

lustre),

573 Flattery of the Great,

The Poet and the Rose,

573

Society Compared to a Bowl of Punch,

The Court of Death,

574

Pomp and Superfluity,

The Hare and Many Friends,

574 ANDREW FLETCHER OF SALTOUN,

625

The Lion, the Tiger, and the Traveller,

574 | JONATHAN SWIFT,

626

Sweet William's Farewell to Black-Eyed Susan,

675

Inconveniences from a Proposed Abolition of Chris-

A Ballad,

575 tianity,

627

THOMAS PARNELL,

576 Arguments for the Abolition of Christianity Treated, 627

The Hermit,

576

Ludicrous Image of Fanaticism,

628

MATTHEW GREEN,

578

A Meditation upon & Broomstick, according to the

Cures for Melancholy,

678 style and manner of the Hon. Robert Boyle's Medi-

Contentment-A Wish,

579 tations,

628

ANNE, COUNTESS OF WINCHELSRA,

Adventures of Gulliver in Brobdingnag,

A Nocturnal Reverie,

580 Satire on Pretended Philosophers and Projectors, 631

Life's Progress,

580 Thoughts on Various Subjects,

634

WILLIAM SOMERVILLE,

580

Overstrained Politeness, or Vulgar Hospitality,

634

ALLAN RAMSAY,

581 ALEXANDER Pope,

635

Ode from Horace,

584 On Sickness and Death,

635

Song- At setting day and rising morn),

585 Pope to Swift-On his Retirement,

636

The Last Time I came o'er the Moor,

585 Pope in Oxford,

636

Lochaber no More,

585

Pope to Lady Mary Wortley Montagu on the Conti-

Rustic Courtship,

586 nent,

Dialogue on Marriage,

586 Death of Two Lovers by Lightning,

637

Description of an Ancient English Country Seat, 638

Pope to Gay-On his Recovery,

639

DRAMATISTS.

Sketch of Autumn Scenery,

Thomas SOUTHEMTB,

589 Pope to Bishop Atterbury, in the Tower,

640

Return of Biron,

588 Party Zeal,

640

NICHOLAS Rowı,

590 Acknowledgment of Error,

640

Penitence and Death of Jane Shore,

590 Disputation,

640

Calista's Passion for Lothario,

591 Censorious People,

640

WILLIAM Lillo,

591 Growing Virtuous in Old Age,

640

Fatal Curiosity,

692

Lying,

640

WILLIAM CONGREVE,

593 Hostile Critics,

640

Gay Young Men upon Town,

594 Sectarian Differences,

640

A Swaggering Bully and Boaster,

594 How to be Reputed a Wise Man,

640

Scandal and Literature in High Life,

695 Avarice,

640

From Love for Love,

696 Minister Acquiring and Losing Office,

641

Sir John YANBRUGH,

597 Receipt to make an Epic Poem,

641

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590

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Page DR Jonx ÁRBUTINOT, 642 Prejudices and Opinions,

658 The History of John Bull, 642 From Maxims Concerning Patriotism,

659 Usefulness of Mathematical Learning,

646 LORD BOLINGBROKE,

646

HISTORICAL, CRITICAL, AND THEOLOGICAL National Partiality and Prejudice,

647

WRITERS. Absurdity of Useless Learning,

648 Unreasonableness of Complaints of the Shortness of LAWRENCE ECHARD,

659 Human Life, 648 John STRYPE,

659 Pleasures of a Patriot, 649 PORTER AND KENNETT,

660 Wise, Distinguished from Cunning Ministers, 650 RICHARD BENTLEY,

600 LADY MARY WORTLEY MONTAGU, 650 Authority of Reason in Religious Matters,

660 To E. W. Montagu, Esq.-In prospect of Marriage, 651 DR FRANCIS ATTERBURY,

661 To the Same-On Matrimonial Happiness, 651 Usefulness of Church Music,

661 To Mr Pope-Eastern Manners and Language, 651 DR SAMUEL CLARKE,

662 To Mrs S. C.-Inoculation for the Small-pox,

652 Natural and Essential Difference of Right and Wrong, 664 To Lady Rich-France in 1718, 653 DR WILLIAM LOWTH,

665 To the Countess of Bute-Consoling her in Affliction, 653 DR BENJAMIN HOADLY,

665 To the Same-On Female Education, 653 The Kingdom of Christ not of this World,

665 Ironical View of Protestant Infallibility,

666 CHARLES LESLIE,

667 MBTAPHYSICIANS. WILLIAM WHISTON,

668

Anecdote of the Discovery of the Newtonian PhiloEARL OP SHAFTESBURY, 654 sophy,

608 Platonic Representation of the Scale of Beauty and DR PHILIP DODDRIDGE,

068 Love, 655 The Dangerous Illness of a Daughter,

670 Bishop BERKELEY, 656 Happy Devotional Feelings of Doddridge,

671 Verses on the Prospect of Planting Arts and Learning in Vindication of Religious Opinions,

671 America,

657 DR WILLIAM Nicolson - DR MATTHEW TINDAL-DR Industry,

658
HUMPHREY PRIDEAUX,

679

CALIFORMES

CYCLOPÆDIA OF ENGLISH LITERATURE.

First Period.

FROM THE EARLIEST TIMES TO 1400.

age presents us with historical chronicles, theologiANGLO-SAXON WRITERS.

cal treatises, religious, political, and narrative poetry,

in great abundance, written both in Latin and in the HE ENGLISH native tongue.* LANGUAGE is The earliest name in the list of Anglo-Saxon essentially a writers is that of Gildas, generally described as a branch of the missionary of British parentage, living in the first Teutonic, the half of the sixth century, and the author of a Latin language spo- tract on early British history. Owing to the obken

by the scurity of this portion of our annals, it has been the inhabitants of somewhat extraordinary fate of Gildas to be reprecentral Eu- sented, first as flourishing at two periods more than a rope immedi-century distant from each other; then as two differately before ent men of the same name, living at different times ; the dawn of and finally as no man at all

, for his very existence history, and is now doubted. Nennius is another name of this which constitutes the foun- age, which, after being long connected with a small dation of the modern Ger- historical work, written, like that of Gildas, in Latin, man, Danish, and Dutch. has latterly been pronounced supposititious. The Introduced by the Anglo- first unquestionably real author of distinction is

Saxons in the fifth century, ST COLUMBANUS, a native of Ireland, and a man it gradually spread, with the of vigorous ability, who contributed greatly to people who spoke it, over the advancement of Christianity in various parts of nearly the whole of England, Western Europe, and died in 615. He wrote reli

the Celtic, which had been gious treatises and Latin poetry. As yet, no eduthe language of the aboriginal people, shrinking cated writer composed in his vernacular tongue: it before it into Wales, Cornwall

, and other remote was generally despised by the literary class, as was parts of the island, as the Indian tongues are now the case at some later periods of our history, and retiring before the advance of the British settlers Latin was held to be the only language fit for reguin North America.*

lar composition. From its first establishment, the Anglo-Saxon The first Anglo-Saxon writer of pote, who comtongue experienced little change for five centuries, posed in his own language, and of whom there are the chief accessions which it received being Latin any remains, is CÆDMON, a monk of Whitby, who terms introduced by Christian missionaries. Dur- died about 680. Cadmon was a genius of the class ing this period, literature flourished to a much headed by Burns, a poet of nature's making, sprung greater extent than might be expected, when we from the bosom of the common people, and little consider the generally rude condition of the people. indebted to education. It appears that he at one It was chiefly cultivated by individuals of the reli- time acted in the capacity of a cow-herd. The cirgious orders, a few of whom can easily be discerned, cumstances under which his talents were first dethrough their obscure biography, to have been men veloped, are narrated by Bede with a strong cast of of no mean genius. During the eighth century, the marvellous, under which it is possible, however, books were multiplied immensely by the labours of to trace a basis of natural truth. We are told that these men, and through their efforts learning de- he was so much less instructed than most of his scended into the upper classes of lay society. This equals, that he had not even learnt any poetry; 80 *It is now believed that the British language was not so hide his shame, when the harp was moved towards

that he was frequently obliged to retire, in order to immediately or entirely extinguished by the Saxons as was him in the hall, where at supper it was customary generally stated by our historians down to the last age. But certainly it is true in the main, that the Saxon succeeded the for each person to sing in turn. On one of these British language in all parts of England, except Wales, Corn- * Biographia Britannica Literaria : Anglo-Saxon Period. By wall, and some other districts of less note.

Thomas Wright, M.A.

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