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PAGE.

PAGE.
Foreign Sovereign,....
67 Insurance, Marine,

69
Former Adjudication .............. 119, 333

Interest,

. i 27, 548
Fraud,.........120, 333, 359, 548, 563, 696 Internal Revenue,

311
Frauds, Statute of,............ 120, 333, 696 International Law, Private, ........

493
Fraudulent Conveyance, ....... 68, 120 548 Interrogatories,

127
Representations...

305
G.
Jests about Law and Lawyers,....

15
General Assembly,..........

.....
333

250
Joint Effects,

127
Gift.....

..68, 121, 305 Joint Stock Association.........
Gifts, Inter Vivos,
396

335

Tenants,
Gold Contract,

121

Judges, Private Communications to, 508
Good-Will,..... .....

121
Judgment,

128, 335, 359, 698

543
Goethe's Caricature of the Vener-

Judicial Separation,..
able Sages of the Law............. 8

Sales,

564
Gove
nt, Modern Theories of,
Jurisdiction........ 128, 161, 312, 564, 184

335
28, 199, 407 Juror, ....
Grant,
121

572

Juror, Disqualification of,.........
Grant, Sir Wm.......

2
Jury,....

.129, 360, 698, 394

335
Guardian,

Justice of the Peace,
121
Justices' Courts,.......

335
and Ward,.......... 122, 333 696

Juvenal's Satire of certain Advocates 6
H.

L.
Habeas Corpus.....

122

Laches,.....
Highways,..
.122, 334, 563

.129, 335, 518
Homestead,

... 122, 158, 359

Landlord and Tenant, ...... 130, 336, 698
Homicide and Defence of Insanity,.. 621

Land and Land Titles.......

.129, 335

129
Husband and Wife,.... 122, 334, 563 697

“ Damages.......
Law and Lawyers, London,.......

400
I.

New York,.......... 401
Illegal Consideration,..

69 Law, The, How it has fared in Liter-
Illegality,
697 ature, ·

5
Illegitimate Child,..

Lawyer and Client,

399
Improvements,

124 Lawyers, excluded from Sir Thos.
Incomplete Gift...
305 Moore's Utopia,......

16
Indictment,

124 Lease,

.130, 162, 564
Indorsement, unauthorized, by one “Legal Memory," Origin and His-
of two Partners..
60 tory of,.....

402
Indorser, etc.,
.158, 697

595

Legal Maxims, Broom's, ....
Infancy,

..124, 334
Legal Restraints,

396
Infants,....

131
.334, 548

Legislature,
Injunction, ..125, 161, 334, 359, 563, 698, Levy,..

162
390 Liability of Master for Negligence
Injunction before Bill filed, .....

Servant,..
Insanity, etc.,......

621
Solicitor,

544
Insolvent,

311 Lien,......

. 131, 565, 698
Instructions,
.334 366 Life Insurance,...

131, 312
Insurance,... ..126, 306, 334. 563, 698 Light and Air,....

.544, 668
Companies,

584 Limitation of Actions,.131, 337, 360, 565
Insurance, May's.......

382

Statute of,...

..132, 565, 699

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.69, 543

66

69

72

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..127,

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PAGE.

.136,

PAGE.
Lis Pendens........

132 New York Supreme Court Reports,
Lope de Vega's ridicule of the

Vol. 1,

383
Profession,
7 Nonsuit,......

136
Lord's Day,
132 Notaries,

136
Loss of Freight,.........

70
Notes, ..

.194, 391, 599, 728
Louisiana,...
95 Notice, .....

549
Novation,

567
M.
Nuisance,.....

567
Malicious Prosecution.........

337
Nul tiel record,

184
Management by Trustees,

306

0.
Mandamus, ..... .75, 132, 360, 549, 565
Mandatory Injunction,..

544 Obligations in Roman Law,
Mandeville, Sir John, Description

Savigny's Treatise, ....... 594
of Lawyers,

9
Officer,

567
Manslaughter........

132
Opinions of the Court,

. 549
Marriage Settlement,

133

P.
Married Women,....

.133, 163, 312
Master and Servant,......72, 133, 544,

Parent and Child,

567
549, 565
Parkman Murder,...

237
Measure of Damages, ................. 72, 337

Partition,

.136, 340, 361
Medical Jurisprudence, Wharton's

Partners,...

.137, 307
and Stille's,

191

Partnership,........137, 163, 340, 361, 250
Medical Jurisprudence, Elwell's..... 192

Passenger,

341
Taylor's...... 591
Patent,

549
Milton's Estimate of Lawyers, .

6

Reports, Fisher's......... 192
Sonnet to Cyriac Skinner,..

Pawn,...
6

138
Minor,

516
..........565, 699

“People, The,”
Misdescription in Will,

73

Plea of Discharge in Bankruptcy,.... 164
Ancient Docii-

Pleading.....................138, 341, 362, 569
Pleading and Practice, ..

139
ments,..... 76
Visrepresentation of Fact, 59 Pledge, .......

139
Mistake,

Power of Sale,...
337

341
Montesquieu's Spirit of Laws, ......... 187

Powers,...

567
Mortgage,... 134, 162, 313, 338, 360, 566

Practice......... 139, 163, 341, 342, 362, 568
699
Practice at Common Law,...

342
Mortgage by Deposit,

73

in Probate Courts, etc.,.. 381
Devise,...

306
Practice in Supreme Courts,

139
Motions.........

360
Precatory Trust,

545
Municipal Taxes,....

566
Preference of Creditors,

163
Murder, the Parkman,
237 Presumption,

140
Presumptions of Law,..

712
N.
Presumptions, Legal,......

247

Principal and Agent,... .74, 140, 568
National Banks..

134

Surety,

..343, 362
Navigation,.......
134 Privilege Tax,.

.274, 484
ecessaries in a Foreign Port... 549

Probate Duty, ..........

307
Negligence,... 134, 338, 514, 566,170, 699 Process,

568
Law of, Campbell's,.. 597 Promissory Note, .........73, 140, 344, 568
Negotiable Instrument..73, 135, 313, 28 Proof of Debt,....

163, 307
New Trial,
.. 135, 340, 361 Proviso,.....

308

66

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Slander and Libel, Townshend,....... 191
Slaughter-house Cases,

476
Solicitor's Lien, .....

308
Spirituous Liquors,

169
State Government,

347
State Reports, Digest of,.

314
Statute of Frauds,..78, 146, 308, 347, 669
Limitations,

. 146, 569
Statutes, Construed,

347
Stay Laws,......

395
Stock Broker,

146
Supervisor,

569
Supreme Court of United States,
Digest of Decisions of,.

310
Surety,
Surviving Partner,

167
Swift's estimate of Lawyers,...

R.

. 147, 347

Rabelais' Ridicule of Lawyers..., 7
Racine's Burlesque of the Ma-
chinery of Justice,...

7
Railroad Corporations .....

..141, 345
Railroad Stock,

142
Railroads,

.141, 345, 550, 568, 656
Railway,

... 74, 75
Railway Law in Illinois,

384
Rebellion, The............

....47, 550
Receiver,

142
Recent American Decisions,

168
Recognizance,

.142, 345
Recoupment,

142
Redemption,

142, 345, 363
Rehearing,

142
Relief from Forfeiture,

308
Religious Societies,

569
Remedies for Torts, etc, Hilliard's,... 378
Removal of Causes,

142, 345
Replevin,..

.76, 143, 363
Reports, 52 N. H.

.193, 380
Repugnant Gift,

669
Reputation,

.169, 346
Revenue Collector,'.

363
Revenue, Fraud on,..

548
Res Judicata,

143
Resulting Trusts,

.346, 363
Revivor,

143
Revocation of Will,

79, 80
Reward,

144
Right, Immemorial Exercise of a, 76
Right of Way,......

..

T.
Tax, ................ 147, 348, 364, 550, 569
Tax Privilege,

.274, 484
Tax Sales,..

.348, 364
Tax Title,

570
Taxation,

.364, 569
Telegraph,

147
Tenant by Curtesy,

308
Tender,

348
Testamentary Paper,

78, 349
Suit,

78
Theatrical Engagement,

79
Tichborne Trial,

403
Timber,

349
Title,

..147, 348
Town,..

..147, 349
Trade Mark,

148
Trespass,

148, 349, 364
Trial,

148
Trust, etc.,..... 148, 349, 545, 570)
Trustee,..

..... 167, 36, 349

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U.
l'se and Occupation,

550
Usury,.............. 149, 167, 364, 570, 396

V.
Vendor and Vendee, ........150, 350, 669
Vendor's Lien,

..150, 351
Vested Rights,

151
Victor Hugo, two sketches of crimi-

nal trials, by,
Voluntary Settlement,

578

Sale of Business,..

77
Sales,.....144, 165, 316, 569, 388, 423, 493
Scire facias,

.145, 316, 363
Scott, Sir Wm

3
Separate Estate,

145, 166, 454
Set-off,

145, 166
Settlement, Voluntary,

578
Sewer,

569
Shakspeare's allusions to Law and
Lawyers....

11
Shelley's Case, the Rule in, ex..
plained,

18
Shelley's Case, The Reasons and

Policy of the Rule,..
Shelley's Case, Why the Rule should
be retained,

24
Sheriff,....

..146, 165, 346, 363
Slander,

346

22

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An old manuscript diary kept by the late Chief Justice Taylor, of North Carolina, during a visit to England in 1807, has fallen into our hands. Though written currente calamo, and intended for the instruction and entertainment of his own household, we find in it many things that would interest the general reader—and some glimpses at the bench of England, in those days, which will interest the members of the legal profession, several of which we extract.

LORD CHANCELLOR ELDON. The Chief Justice then states his impressions of the distinguished Lord Chancellor:

“To-day I visited Lincoln's Inn Fields, where I understood the Lord Chancellor was hearing causes. The hall is spacious, and the floor thickly carpeted. I confess my astonishment was great when I entered to hear a counsel addressing the Chancellor in ungrammatical language, delivered in a harsh brogue and stentorian voice. Surely, I thought, there must be some character of strength in his mind, or some distinction of superior learning to compensate for these defects. I listened longer, but found him uninformed-and when I had an opportunity of looking at the faces of the other counsel, perceived that they were endeavoring to stifle a laugh. The Lord Chancellor partook of the general mirth, but made great effort to conceal it by holding a brief before his face, and sometimes stooping down, under the pretence of examining it. Hale, for such I learned was the name of the counsel, made a very silly speech to support a still more foolish demurrer. He was replied te by a Mr.

VOL. III-NO, I-1

Harte, in a very clear and logical manner, and the Lord Chancellor gave an opinion with as much deliberation as if he had listened to an able discussion on both sides. Though the faces of the Lord Chancellor and his brother are totally different, yet a little examination discovers a family resemblance. The features of the former do not bespeak so much of genius, of deep thought or of firmness, but more of suavity and benevolence. I should pronounce him to be a man possessing more of the milk of human kindness, and far less energy of mind and power of investigation. His character, as a Chancellor, is that of delaying business from his extreme caution

--and from the fear of doing wrong, doing little or nothing. But whatever he does is considered well done.

LORD ERSKINE AND SIR WM. GRANT.

As a Chancellor Lord Erskine gave great satisfaction—not so much for the correctness of his decrees as for the promptness and decision with which he pronounced them. He took uncommon pains to prevent the delays for which the court was so justly complained of--and the officers of the court would all have been satisfied at his remaining in office. But the mind, whose character as a chancery lawyer, rises far above that of all others in England, is Sir William Grant, the Master of the Rolls. The Chancery Bar unanimously speak of him as a man equal, if not superior, to any one who has ever presided in that court. He has been twice pressed to accept the seals, but prefers the plodding permanence of his pres ent inferior situation, to the more miscellaneous, splendid, but precarious one of Lord Chancellor. He is a grave and studious man, and upon all occasions, maintains the dignity of the judicial character. Judge, then, of his feelings upon the following occasion, which was related to me by the best authority, and may be relied on. Lord Erskine had called upon him as an assizor in a very novel and intricate case. They had heard several arguments, and the Chancellor had appointed a day when he would call upon the Master of the Rolls, and conduct him to his country seat at Hampstead, where they might discuss the matter at perfect leisure. The Master of the Rolls was very much surprised when Erskine drove up to his house, in Chancery lane, in a gig tandem. He could not, however, decline the exhibition, and away they drove through the most populous part of London, Lord Erskine displaying his dexterity in driving—and now and then cutting a fly from the leader's ear. The grave and dignified Master of the Rolls was much an

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