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LOVE OF GLORY.

SLOTH. In short, the love of glory gives no small Thou seest how sloth wastes the sluggish body, strength to the mind, and the desire of praise in- as the water is corrupted unless it is moved. spires men with eloquence.

Proverbs xxi. 25:

"The desire of the slothful killeth him; for his hands refuse THE RESULT.

to labor." The result is a small ember of my exertions.

PURSUITS.
THE RICH.

Every one is fond of his own pursuits, and de

lights to spend time in his accustomed art.
The shade of the rich man will carry nothing to
the grave.

THE GLADIATOR.
DESERT NOT THE UNFORTUNATE.

The wounded gladiator forswears all fighting, When God thunders, not to withdraw ourselves

but soon, forgetful of his former wound, he re

sumes his arms. from the storm is proof of reverential awe and of affection for our friends.

USELESS ARTS.

Nothing is more useless to man than those arts MERIT UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF FORTUNE.

which have no utility. Rare indeed is the merit not under the influence of fortune.

INGENUOUS ARTS.

The heart of man is softened by ingenuous THE OLIVE BRANCH OF PEACE.

arts, to which thou art specially devoted, and In war the olive branch of peace is of use. churlishness flies away.

TO HAVE DESERVED PUNISHMENT.

НОРЕ. It is less to suffer punishment than to have de- ! Hope causes the shipwrecked mariner, when no served it.

land appears around, to strike out in the midst of

the waves. The skill of the physician has often PUNISHMENT.

confessed itself baffled, but hope still lingered ha romitted the animal while life was ebbing. The prisoner hopes for The punishment may be remitted; the crime will be forever.

safety in his prison; while the man hanging on

the cross offers up prayers for release. DREAMS.

St. Basil, writing to Gregory of Nazianzus (Epist. xiv. p.

93) calls " Hopes the waking dreams of men." Dreams alarm me that portray my real misfort

And Pope (" Essay on Man," Ep. i. L 95) speaks of it thus:unes, and my waking senses are ever alive to my

"Hope springs eternal in the human breast, sorrows.

Man never is but always to be blest."

And Prior, to the Hon. Charles Montague:-
WOUNDS.

“Our hopes, like tow'ring falcons, aim A wound may perhaps be closed in time, but

At objects in an airy height; freshly inflicted, it shrinks from the touch.

The little pleasure of the game

Is from afar to view the flight."

And Shakespeare (“Measure for Measure," iii. 1):-
LOVE OF COUNTRY.

“The miserable have no other medicine, Love of country more powerful than reason it

But only hope." self.

And (“Two Gentlemen of Verona," ill. 1):

Hope is a lover's staff; walk hence with that, THE PHYSICIAN'S SKILL NOT OMNIPOTENT.

And manage it against despairing thoughts."

And Goldsmith (song from the “Captivity "):It is not always in the power of the physician A

“The wretch condemn'd with life to part, to relieve the patient: sometimes the disease is be

Still, still on hope relies, yond the reach of art.

And every pang that rends the heart

Bids expectation rise.
CARE.

Hope like the glimmering taper's light,

Adorns and cheers the way; Neither gout nor dropsy can be removed by the

And still, as darker grows the night, power of medicine. Care, too, is at times beyond

Emits a brighter ray." the reach of art, or is only to be assuaged by length of time.

TRUE NOBILITY.

It is not wealth nor ancestry, but honorable FATHERLAND.

conduct and a noble disposition, that make men Our fatherland charms us with delights that we great. cannot express, and never allows us to forget that we owe to it our birth.

“ TARES.”

As often as Jove sends showers to refresh the A FRAIL BARK.

fields, the clinging bur springs up amidst the We have ploughed the vast ocean in a frail bark. I wheat.

Shakespeare (“Richard III." if. 4):

VIRTUE REQUIRES NO REWARD. "Sweet flowers are slow and weeds make haste."

In thy judgment virtue, without the aid of outBAD FORTUNE.

ward advantages, stands in no need of reward, and

must be sought for her own sake. The most miserable fortune is safe for there is | no fear of anything worse.

DIFFERENT PURSUITS, BUT BOTH LIBERAL. THE TONGUE.

Our pursuits indeed differ, but they are derived

from the same source; both of us are devoted to a My tongue, be silent; not another word must be liberal art. said.

A FUTURE AGE.
THE UPWARD PATH OF VIRTUE.

A coming age will admire.
It is a difficult path, I confess, but virtue mounts
upward, and so much greater will be the fame de-

THE NERVOUS. rived from such meritorious exertions.

The wounded limb shrinks even from the genTHE MERCIFUL JUDGE.

tlest touch, and to the nervous the smallest shadow

excites alarm. Who, when he has come to a sad decision, is himself sad, and who almost feels the infliction of

A DROP. the punishment as if it were inflicted on himself.

Stones are hollowed by constant drops of water. Shakespeare (“Measure for Measure,” iii. 2): –

Shakespeare ("Henry VI." Part III. act iii. sc. 2);-
“He who the sword of heaven will bear,
Should be as holy as severe;

“Much rain wears the marble."
Pattern in himself to know,
Grace to stand, and virtue go;

INGENUOUS ARTS.
More nor less to others paying,
Than by self-offences weighing,

Many seek glory by ingenuous arts.
Shame to him, whose cruel striking
Kills for faults of his own liking."

THE WOLF.
POPULACE.

The wolf rushes on a flock of sheep that it may The vulgar throng estimates friends by the adal vantage to be derived from them.

EXILE.

The place makes banishment more bearable. VIRTUE ITS OWN REWARD. Thou wilt scarcely find one in a thousand who

AGRICULTURE. will regard virtue as its own reward. Honor itself possesses no charms if it is unattended by

It is pleasant to pass one's time in the cultiva recompense; and we are ashamed to be good, if no

tion of the fields. we are not to be compensated.

PURE WATER. So Home (“Douglas," act iii. sc. 1):"Amen! and virtue is its own reward!”

There is in pure water no small pleasure.

ne

SELF-INTEREST.

THE MINV. Nowadays every one looks after his own inter- The mind conquers everything; it gives even ests, and calculates on his anxious fingers what strength to the body. may turn out useful to himself.

Of the power of the mind Pope (" Essay on Man," Ep. ii. L. So Churchill (" The Conference," 1. 167):

104) thus speaks:“Explore the dark recesses of the mind,

“But strength of mind is exercise, not rest; In the soul's honest volume read mankind,

The rising tempest puts in act the soul, And own, in wise and simple, great and small,

Parts it may ravage, but preserves the whole.

On life's vast ocean diversely we sail. The same grand leading principle in all, .... And by whatever name we call

Reason the card, but passion is the gale." The ruling tyrant, Self is all in all."

A PLEASING COUNTENANCE. · PROSPERITY.

A pleasing countenance is no slight advantage Nobody is loved except the man to whom fort-to man. une is favorable; when she thunders, she drives away all that are near.

THE MISERABLE.
THE THORN AND THE ROSE.

Believe me, it is noble to aid the afflicted, and is

worthy of such a mighty potentate as thou art. The prickly thorn often bears soft roses.

So Matthew xx. 25, 28:Anonymous ("To Fielding, on the revival of the Intriguing

“Ye know that the princes of the Gentiles exercise dominChambermaid "):-

ion over them, and they that are great exercise authority upon * Where the sharp thistle springs, implant the corn, them. But it shall not be so among you: but whosoever will nd graft the rose upon the spring thorn."

I be great among you, let him be your minister."

[graphic]

HIGH POWER.

| THE RESULT OF THE APPLAUSES OF THE PUBLIC. Royal power is never seen in a better cause than Every genius may feel elated at the applauses 5 often as it does not allow prayers to be offered of the public and its joyous acclamation. ) no effect.

NOVELTY.
MERCY.

Novelty in everything is most pleasing; and It is a pleasure proper for man to save a fellow

how gratitude is refused to a kindness which is slow reature, and gratitude is better acquired in noin ther way. Shakespeare (“Merchant of Venice," act iv. so. 1) says:-

THE LAST ROBE. "It is enthroned in the hearts of kings,

It makes not the least difference whether thou It is an attribute to God himself;

be the first to pluck the rose, or they be the last An earthly power doth then show likest God's,

on the bush. When mercy seasons justice."

RESULT OF EDUCATION.

THE FATE OF WRITINGS AFTER DEATH. To be thoroughly imbued with the liberal arts

Writings generally begin to please from the moefines the manners, and makes men to be mild

iament of a man's death, for spite assails the living, nd gentle in their conduct.

and carps at him with unjust tooth. Pope ("Moral Essays," I. Part ii.) says:

BAD LIFE. “ 'Tis education forms the common mind, Just as the twig is bent, the tree's inclin'd.”

To lead a dissipated life may be called a kind of

death. POETS HAVE COMMON TIES.

GOODWILL IS SOMETIMES SUFFICIENT. Yet between poets there are certain common ies, though we, each of us, pursue our respective Though the power be wanting, yet the mere de paths.

sire to assist is worthy of praise.

THE ADVANTAGE OF ENCOURAGEMENT.

GOD. The spirited steed, which will contend of its There is a divinity in our breast. wn accord for the victory, will run still more! Cato (act v. sc. 1) says:wift if thou givest encouragement.

“ 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us;

'Tis Heaven itself that points out an hereafter, DESIRE OF SUCCESS.

And intimates eternity to man." To wish is of slight moment; thou oughtest to

FRESH FRUIT ON THE TREE. lesire with earnestness to be successful, and this inxiety should shorten thy hours of rest.

It is more delightful to pull down a branch, and pluck a fresh apple, than to pick one from a carved

dish. TEARS. Tears are sometimes equal in weight to words.

THE AFFLICTED. Hood (" Song of the Shirt "):

The gods, believe me, spare the afflicted, and “My tears must stop, for every drop

do not always oppress the unfortunate. Hinders my needle and thread."

Pomfret, to his friend under affliction:And Scott:

"Heaven is not always angry when he strikes, “The rose is sweetest wash'd with morning dew,

But most chastises those whom most he likes." And love is loveliest when embalm'd in tears."

THE AUTHOR. THE EFFECT OF THE THUNDERBOLT.

An author is pleased with his own work.
Though the thunderbolt strikes only one, it is
not only one that it alarms.

DISEASES.
ENVY.

The art of perceiving diseases and of removing

them is not the same: perception exists in all; Envy, the meanest of vices, does not enter the

but it is by skill alone that diseases are cured. minds of the noble, but creeps on the ground like hidden serpent.

COALS TO NEWCASTLE. Sheridan (“The Critic," act i. sc. 1):* There is not a passion so strongly rooted in the human To send verses to him was to add leaves to a beart as envy."

wood.

GREAT POETS.

THE PROSPEROUS. Great poets do not require an indulgent reader; While my ship was supported with a strong keel, they charm any one, however much against his thou wast the first to be willing to sail along with will, and however difficult to please.

Ime.

MISFORTUNE.

THE UNCERTAINTY OF HUMAN AFFAIRS.

LOVE.
All human things hang on a slender thread, and Love is full of anxious fears.
the strongest fall with a sudden crash.
So Jeremiah ix. 23:-

LOVERS. “Neither let the haughty man glory in his might.”

If thou wert to count the hours as we lovers do, LOVE OF FAME.

we do not complain before we ought. We were

slow to hope; we do not .quickly believe what is The love of fame gives an immense stimulus.

injurious if true. THE GODS.

FALSE PROMISES. Heaven makes sport of the affairs of men, and

| Demophoon, thou hast given both words and we know not what a day may bring forih.

sails to the winds; what I complain of is, that thy UNCERTAINTY OF HUMAN EVENTS.

sails are never to return, and that thy promises

re false. Consider that the things which seem joyful too thee while thou speakest may become a source of

BROKEN FAITH. grief.

Where now are the laws of thy country, thy

pledged word, thy right hand joined to right hand! Bad fortune has made no lot so miserable that a And the gods so often invoked by thy false tongue. respite of the evil does not bring some relief.

CREDULITY.
THE MIND'S EYE.

We foolishly believe those oaths thou swearest, Though absent, I shall see you with my mind's of which thou wast liberal enough; we trusted eye.

the honor of thy race and high birth; we trusted Shakespeare ("Hamlet," i. 2):

thy tears; are these also able to be simulated! “In my mind's eye, Horanto."

Have these, too, their guile and flow as they are

bid? THE WIDOW'S MITE. But he who gives all that he can is abundantly

SUCCESS. grateful, and his return has reached its natural. I wish that whoever thinks that deeds are to be limit; nor is the incense which the poor man regarded according to their result, may never eoffers from his tiny censer of less avail with the joy success. gods than what is given from the rich man's bowl.

MAY I BE SWALLOWED UP BY THE EARTH.

I pray that I may be first swallowed up by the By verse the virtuous are made immortal, and, sudden gaping of the earth, or be burnt by the secure from death, they are handed down to the ruddy flash of the thunderbolt. latest posterity.

WORDS OF NO WEIGHT.
THE IMPORTANCE OF WRITINGS.

But my words are of no weight.
What is written survives the lapse of years; it is
by writings that you know Agamemnon, and who

LOVE. fought for or against him.

It is not safe to despise what Cupid bids; he THE MIND.

| reigns supreme, and rules over the mightiest gods. The mind alone cannot be sent into exile.

INITIATION IN CRIMES FROM EARLY YEARS THE GIVER.

When there is initiation in crime from earliest The gift derives its value from the rank of the years, they become a part of nature. giver.

MISFORTUNES THAT ARE UNDESERVED. THE DROP.

We ought to bear with patience what befalls us The drop hollows out the stone; the ring is according to our deserts; it is the unmerited evil worn by use; and the crooked ploughshare is that is to be regarded with sorrow. rubbed away by the earth.

CHASTITY.
RENEWING GRIEF.

Chastity once lost, cannot be recalled; it goes When length of time has assuaged the wounds only once. of the mind, he, who reminds us of them unseasonably, brings them up afresh.

LIGHTNESS OF CHARACTER.

Thou art lighter than leaves at the time when, PRUDENCE FORSAKES THE WRETCHED.

being without the weight of juice, dried up, they Believe me, that it is prudence that first forsakes fly about hy the ever-moving winds; and there i the miserable.

| less weight in thee than in the topmost part of

POETRY.

the grain which is hardened by the constant heat of the sun.

Shakespeare ("Two Gentlemen of Verona," act v. sc. 4) says:

"How use doth breed a habit in a man."

FIRE.

LOVE. Love is credulous. Would that I could be called rash for having accused my husband of crimes of which he was guiltless!

For who can conceal fire, which always betrays itself by its own light?

A GIFT. A WOUND FROM AN UNEXPECTED QUARTER.

We like the gift, when we the giver prize. I have received a wound from an unexpected quarter.

DO NOT EXCITE THE WRATH OF A KING. LOVE.

Knowest thou not that kings have long arms ? Love is to be acquired by beauty of mind and This is the Greek proverb:

“He who sups with the devil must have a long spoon.” body. THE HARD-HEARTED.

A FLAME NEWLY RAISED. Thou hast been begotten by a stone, and mount

A flame newly raised is extinguished by a little

wator.
ains and oaks growing on lofty rocks, and savage
beasts.

HOPE.
THE SEA.

Good hope is often deceived in its predictions. Yet the wide expanse of sea witnesses many sad

THE MIND. scenes.

And I am borne in spirit whither I am not able THE SAME FATE TO THE END OF LIFE. in body. The fate which attended me before, continues

HOPE AND REALITY. to the end, and follows me to the last moment of

Hopes are not always realized, but they are ever my life.

present. THE WICKED.

JOYS. The right hand of the wicked cannot offer due. Every delay is regarded as long which puts oli homage to the gods.

our joys. So James iv. 8:"Cleanse your hands, ye sinners."

A BURDEN.

'Tis patience that makes a burden light. THE BEGINNING BETTER THAN THE END.

So Matthew xi. 29:Thou beginnest better than thou endest: the “Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek last is inferior to the first.

and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.

For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light."
MARRY YOUR EQUAL.

THE POWER OF RAGE.
If thou wishest to marry wisely, marry thy Rage assists hands, however feeble.
equal.

TIME. "Like blood, like good, and like age, make the happiest marriage.”

Life steals on and time escapes from us like the

swift river that glides on with rapid stream. LOVE AND WAR.

Shakespeare (“ All's Well that Ends Well," act v. sc. 8);Let others wage wars; let Protesilaus have the

“The inaudible and noiseless foot of Time." enjoyments of love.

And Chaucer ("The Clerk's Tale '') says:

“For tho' we slepe or wake, or rome or ride, It is thought that this may be the origin of the often-cited expression:

Ay fleeth the time, it will no man bide."

So Psalm xc. 5:"Bella gerant alii; tu felix Austria nube.”

"Thou carriest them away as with a flood." THE LAST FAREWELL.

NECESSITY OF INDUSTRY. And the tongue said with low murmurs, Fare-l Vessels of bronze become bright by use; magwell!

nificent dresses are made to be worn: houses

abandoned to long neglect grow hoary with age. BEAUTY. If but to one that's equally divine,

NOBLE TO GIVE.
None you'll incline to, you'll to none incline. It is a noble thing to give generously.
USE IS SECOND NATURE.

MANY A LITTLE MAKES A MUCKLE. 1 Pursuits become habits.

If they shall beg a few things from a great num

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