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ber, by and by a great heap will be accumulated, falling leaves; the wind and the waves bear them .rom their gleanings.

without effort wherever they choose.

MEDICATED POISON.

WHAT IS EASILY GOT IS LITTLE CARED FOR Deadly poisons sometimes lurk under sweet

What may be got is despised; what cannot, is Doney.

eagerly desired. 1 Watt says: “The rills of pleasure never run sincere,

THE CHASTENING OF THE LORD. (Earth has no unpolluted spring:)

Be firm and endure; this pain will hereafter be From the cursed soil some dang'rous taint they bear, So roses grow on thorns, and honey wears a sting." for thy good: a bitter draught often brings relief

to the sick. EVERY LOVER IS A SOLDIER. Every lover is a soldier.

DEATH.

Death, who will take no refusal, profanes every. LOVE IS A CAUSE OF GREAT ANXIETY.

| thing sacred; it lays its hands silently on all. Let the man who does not wish to be idle fall in love.

COALS TO NEWCASTLE.

Thou pourest fire into fire, water into the sea. THANKS. Thanks are justly due for things got without

THE POWER OF COMMITTING SIN. purchase.

He, who has it in his power to commit sin, is

less inclined to do so. The very idea of being FAME FROM POETRY.

able weakens the desire.
The honors which poetry will confer will be
never-dying.

THE FORBIDDEN.
THE SUPREMACY OF POETRY.

We are ever hankering after the forbidden, and

covet what is refused us: thus the dropsical long Let kings and the triumphs of kings give way for the water they must not touch. to verse.

So Genesis iii. 1:-
ENVY.

And the serpent said to the woman, Yea, hath God said,

Ye shall not eat of every tree of the garden !" Envy feeds on living merit; it ceases after death, when a man's real character defends each accord

WE COVET WHAT IS CAREFULLY GUARDED. ing to his actual deserts.

We are apt to covet the more whatever is

guarded; the very care invokes the thief. Few THE MAN THAT IS FEARED.

care for what they may have. Every one is desirous that the man should perish of whom he is afraid.

WEALTH GIVES HONORS.

Parliament is closed to the poor; it is wealth TO ACKNOWLEDGE ONE'S FAULTS.

that confers honors. I would not presume to defend my dissolute Sophocles (Philoct. 304) says:habits, and to throw a false glare over my mis

“Not hither are the voyages of the prudent among men* deeds.

GENIUS IN OLDEN TIMES.
PATIENCE.

Genius in olden times was more precious than

gold, but the barbarism of the present day pats no Let those who have deserved it suffer punish

account on it. ment with patience.

THE CRETANS ARE LIARS.
COALS TO NEWCASTLE.

The Cretans do not always tell lies.
Why dost thou add leaves to trees, stars to the
crowded sky, water to the vast ocean?

THE LICENCE OF POETS.

The unbridled licence of poets ranges “from SLEEP.

earth to heaven," nor are his words subject to Thou fool, what is sleep but the image of cold historic truth. death? Fate will give an eternity of rest.

THE SECRETS OF NIGHT.
THE SHIP.

What madness it is to confess in the day what It is too late to look with wistful eyes to the is concealed by the darkness of night, and to shore, when the rope has been loosed, and the relate openly what thou hast done secretly! rounded keels sweeps through the boundless

THE ADVANTAGES OF ART.

Ships are moved with rapidity by art, sails, and THE WORDS OF A GIRL.

oars; the light chariot is moved by art; and love The words of younger girls are lighter than the is governed by the assistance of art.

deep.

TO SEE AND BE SEEN.

TAE PEACOCK. They come to see; they come to be seen.

The bird of Juno displays her feathers, which

thou praisest; if thou look at her in silence, she LIGHT SERVICE.

conceals her beauty. Light service charms light minds.

PERJURIES OF LOVERS.
HEAVENLY GENIUS.

Jupiter, from on high, laughs at the perjuries

of lovers, and orders the winds to scatter them Heavenly genius springs up more quickly. than. its years, and submits, with regret, to the losses

abroad. brought by slow time.

ARTIFICERS OF DEATH.
WINE.

For there is no law more just than this, that the

workman should be hoisted by his own petard... Wine prepares the mind, and makes it ready to be inflamed; care flies, and is drowned in plente

CROCODILE TEARS. ous draughts.

If tears fail thee, for they do not always come SIMPLICITY.

at the wished-for moment, wipe thy eyes with thy Simplicity most rare in our age.

moistened hand.

THE SWARTHY SAILOR.
NIGHT COVERS ALL DEFECTS.

A fair complexion is unbecoming a sailor; he Night covers all blemishes, and every haw is ought to be swarthy from the waters of the sea forgiven.

and the rays of the sun. OUR NEIGHBOR.

A MAN'S OWN GRATIFICATION. The crop seems always more productive in our neighbor's field, and our neighbor's cow has a

His own gratification is the object of each. larger supply of milk.

MORE MERIT IN KEEPING THAN IN GETTING So Luke xv. 29, 80:" Yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry

RICHES. with my friends; but as soon as this thy son was come, which There is no less merit in keeping what we have hath devoured thy living with harlots, thou hast killed for him

I got than in first acquiring it. Chance has somethe fatted calf.”

thing to do with the one, while the other will ANGER IS ASSUAGED BY TIME.

always be the effect of skill. Like brittle ice anger passes away by time.

BE AMIABLE. 80 Psalm cxxx. 5:

Be amiable that thou mayst be loved. "For His anger endured but a moment." THE RESULT.

BEAUTY.
The result is doubtful.

Beauty is a frail good.
A LOVER OF BARGAINS.

EDUCATION.
A woman who is always buying.

And let it be no slight care to cultivate the mind

with the liberal arts, and to learn thoroughly the EFFECT OF PRAYER.

two languages of Greece and Rome. An angry God is propitiated by words of entreaty. | So Psalm ciii. 9:

THE HAWK ALWAYS IN ARMS. " He will not always chide; neither will He keep his anger Churlishness excites hatred and bitter taunts: forever."

hatred excites the hawk, who always lives in arms. NO HARM IN PROMISING.

"Churlishness and bitter taunts excite hatred.” Take care to promise liberally; for what harm is there in promising? Any one can be rich in

THE SWALLOW. promises.

But the swallow has no fear of man, because it A SPEAKING COUNTENANCE.

| is of a gentle nature. A silent countenance often expresses words an .

THE BITTER TONGUE. sounds.

Let strife be at a distance, and the railings of a THE BOLD.

bitter tongue. Gentle love is to be fed by affecFortune and love befriend the bold.

tionate words.

THE ELOQUENCE OF A LOVER.

TO SWIM AGAINST THE CURRENT. See only that thou beginnest; eloquent words Thou canst not get the better of the stream, if will flow spontaneously.

I thou swimmest against the current.

SUBMISSION.

OLD AGE. Submit, thou conquerest; serve, and thou'lt Be mindful even now of old age which is apcommand.

| proaching; thus no moment will pass without

profit. GOLD.

TIME. This is now truly the golden age; the highest honors are bought with gold; even love is pur

We must make use of time: time flies with rapid ohased with gold.

foot.

ENJOY THE PRESENT.
AN AVARICIOUS AGE.
Though thou shouldst come attended by the

Our advantages fly away: gather flowers while

ye may.
Muses, Homer, if thou bringest nothing with thee,
Homer, thou wilt be put out of doors.

CONSTANT CROPPING.
THE RESULTS OF BAD AIR.

A field gets exhausted by constant cropping. Sickness seizes the body from bad ventilation.

NEATNESS OF PERSON.
Custom.

We are charmed by neatness of person; let not Nothing is stronger than habit.

thy hair be out of order.

BASE DEEDS.
A FIELD LONG FALLOW.
Give rest; a field long at rest makes a plentiful

Many deeds, which are base in being committed, return.

when done please. THE RIVER.

THE BAD PREDOMINATE. The river is small at its source, but gains. And there are always more bad than good. strength as it advances, and wherever it passes receives many streamlets.

HYPOCRISY EVEN IN TEARS.

To what point does not art reach? Some learn PROSPERITY.

even to weep with grace. The passions often run riot amidst prosperity, nor is it an easy task to bear it with evenness of

MUSIC OUGHT TO BE LEARNED BY LADIES. mind,

Music is a pleasing accomplishment; let the fair

learn to sing. A DIFFICULT TASK. I attempt a difficult task, but there is nothing

FAME OF A POET. noble that is not arduous.

Perhaps even my name will be mingled with

theirs, nor shall my writings be given over to obSILENCE.

livion. It is but a slight excellence to be silent, but it

THE UNKNOWN. is a grievous fault to speak of things that ought to be concealed.

What is hid is unknown; for what is unknown So Ecclesiastes iii. 7:

there is not desire. “A time to keep silence, and a time to speak.”

So Romans vii. 7:

“For I had not known lust, except the law had said, Thou ENJOY THE PRESENT.

shalt not covet." Wbile youth and years allow it, put thy hand to

• LET YOUR HOOK ALWAYS BE READY. the plough; soon bent old age will creep on with silent foot.

Chance is always powerful: let your hook al

ways be cast. In a pool where you least expect it Euripides (Fr. Antiop. 44) says:

there will be a fish. “Such is the life of wretched men: they are neither altogether happy nor unhappy, they are prosperous and again are unprosperous. Why, pray, as we walk through the world

PEACE. in uncertain bliss, do we not live as pleasantly as we may, not yielding to grief."

Fair peace becomes mankind; fury belongs to

wild beasts. WHY IS THERE EVIL IN THE WORLD? Some of the vulgar throng will say, Why is

GOD IN MAN. there poison in the serpent? And why give up A God resides in us, and we have intercourse the sheep to the ravenous wolf?

with heaven. This spirit within us comes from

the eternal abodes. LAY NOT THE FAULTS OF THE FEW ON THE MANY.

SWEET AND BITTER. · Do not lay the blame on the multitude that is We do not bear the sweet; we are recruited by due to the few.

la bitter potion,

GIFTS.

| confounding the one with the other, virtue has Gifts, believe me, gain over both gods and men; lo

often borne the blame for vice. even Jupiter is soothed by gifts.

DRESS.
Plato (De Republ. Consult. i. 3) says:-
"Gifts persuade the gods, gifts persuade even the noblest! We are captivated by dress.
kings."

TO RULE WITH A FIRM HAND.
THE EARTH.

It is something to hold the sceptre with a firm The earth produces wholesome and unwhole-hand. some plants; the rose is found often next to the nettle.

ENVY. So Psalm civ. 14:

Envy depreciates the genius of mighty Homer. "He causeth the grass to grow for the cattle, and herb for the service of man; that he may bring forth food out of the

Envy assails the noblest; the wind howls round EFFECTS OF TIME.

the highest peaks. For time gives strength; time ripens the young grapes, and changes into a farm stack, what was

THE SMALL NOT TO BE DESPISED. before a green blade.

A boar is often held by a dog of no large size,

ENVY.

earth."

GRIEF.

THE BEGINNINGS.

EVILS. Resist the beginnings of evil; it is too late to There are a thousand forms of evil, there will apply medicine when the mischief has gained | be a thousand forms of remedy. strength by inveterate habit. “He that corrects not youth, controls not age."

ACUTE REMEDIES.

Some bodies are with difficulty healed by a TO-MORROW.

surgeon's knife; many are benefited by potions

and herbs. He, who is not prepared to-day, will be less so to-morrow. MADNESS.

And who has not a thousand causes of grief? When madness is in full flight, give way to it in

AN ILL-TEMPERED MAN. its course; every impulsive feeling is difficult to be met.

All his words bristled with passionate threats. AN IMPATIENT SPIRIT.

PUT SPURS TO THE MIND. An impatient and untutored spirit regrets and And thou wilt be able if thou choosest; now hates words of instruction.

thou must push on steadily; now put spurs to the

swift steed. MEDICAL ART.

DEEDS OF GLORY. Time is generally the best doctor.

It is deeds of high renown that give age to man; Philippides (Fr. Com. Gr. p. 1123, M.) says:

these are what ought to be counted; time is to be "Time, the common physician, will heal thee." filled with these and not with years of idleness.

So P. J. Bailey (“Festus ");-
HOW LOVE IS TO BE CONQUERED.

“We live in deeds, not years: in thoughts, not breaths; If thou wishest to put an end to love, attend to In feelings, not in figures on a dial. business, love gives way to employments: then

We should count time by heart throbs. He most lives

Who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best." thou art likely to be safe.

Sheridan (" Pizarro," act iv. sc. 1):

"A life spent worthily should be measured by a nobler line HOW CARE IS TO BE DISSIPATED.

-by deeds, not years."

Herbert (“Iacula Prudentum"):
The country, companions, and the length of the
journey will afford a thousand solaces for your

“Words are women, deeds are men.”
Dr. Johnson (" The Preface to his Dictionary'') :-

“I am not so lost in lexicography as to forget that words

are the daughters of earth, and that things are the sons of TO BURST THE CHAINS OF LOVE.

heaven." He is the best assertor of his liberties, who has

LIFE IS LENT TO US. burst the chain that galls his breast, and has once for all got rid of the cause of his pain.

Life is given to us for use; it has been given to | us as a loan without interest, and not to be payed

| back on any fixed day. Fortune distributes time VIRTUE AND VICE NEARLY ALLIED.

Jin unequal portions at her will; she hurries off The bad is often too noar akin to the good by the young; she props up the old.

cares.

PERSIUS.

| silently. I allow they do, for it is not every one

that can in the temple do away with the low mutBORN A.D. 34-DIED A.D. 62.

tered whispers and offer up prayers in the open AULUS PERSIUS FLACCUS, born at Volaterræ in

face of heaven. “A clear conscience, a good Etruria, during the consulship of L. Vitellius and name, integrity,” for these he prays loudly, that Fabius Persicus, A.D. 34, received the first rudi

all at hand may hear. But in his inmost breast, ments of his education at his native town, remain

nain and with bated breath, he murmurs, “Oh that my ing there till the age of twelve, when he proceeded

uncle would evaporate! What a splendid funeral: to Rome and studied under Remmius Palæmon and

Would by the favor of Hercules that a pot of gold Verginius Flavius. When he approached man

would ring against my rake! or, would I could hood he received lessons of philosophy from Cor- .wipe out my ward, to

wipe out my ward, to whom I am next heir! For nutus the Stoic, to whom he became much attached.

hed. he is scrofulous, and swollen with acrid bile." He was the friend of Lucan and Cæsius Bassus the lyric poet. He died A.D. 62, before he had com

GOD DOES NOT FORGET THE WICKED. pleted his twenty-eighth year. The extant works Thinkest thou that God has forgiven thee, be of Persius consist of six short satires, extending cause, when He thunders, the holm-oak is rather in all to 650 hexameter lines, and were left in an riven with His sacred bolt than thou and thy imperfect state.

house?

In Ecclesiastes (viii. 11) we find the same idea: AN IGNORAMUS QUOTING FOREIGN LANGUAGES.

“Because sentence against an evil work is not executed Who made the parrot so ready with his “How speedily, therefore the heart of the sons of men is fully set in d'ye do?"

them to do evil."

THE BELLY.

UPRIGHTNESS. The belly, master he of all art, the bounteous Why do we not offer that to the gods, which the giver of genius.

blear-eyed progeny of great Messala cannot give

from his high-heaped charger, Piety to God and VANITY OF HUMAN AFFAIRS.

Justice to man enshrined within the heart; the Oh the cares of men! Oh how much emptiness soul's inmost cell free from pollution; a bosom there is in human affairs.

imbued with generous honor? Give me these to

present at the altar, and I shall gain what I ask THE WISE MAN.

even with a little meal. Whatever Rome in its perverted judgment may Gifford translates it thus:disparage, do not thou subscribe to its verdict, * No: let me bring the immortals, what the race nor by that scale of theirs try to correct thy own Of great Messala, now depraved and base, false balance, nor seek beyond thy own breast for

On their huge charger, cannot:-bring a mind,

Where legal and where moral sense are join'd rules to guide thy conduct.

With the pure essence; holy thoughts that dwell

In the soul's most retired and sacred cell;
THAT'S HE.

A bosom dyed in honor's noblest grain,
Is then thy knowledge of no value, unless

Deep-dyed; with these let me approach the fane,

And Heaven will hear the humble prayer I make, another know that thou possessest that knowl

Though all my offering be a barley cake." edge? But it is a fine thing to be pointed at with

There is a fragment in the “Mimes of Laberius " like this:the finger, and to have it said, “That's he!”

“God looks with complacency on pure, not full, hands." PUBLIC APPLAUSE.

EDUCATION. Lives there the man with soul so dead as to dis

| Thou art now clay, moist and pliant; even now own the wish to merit the people's applause, and must

des applause, and must thou be hastily moulded and fashioned unhaving uttered words worthy to be kept by cedar Linterruptedly by the rapid wheel. oil to latest times, to leave behind him rhymes that dread neither herrings nor frankincense.

HYPOCRISY.
PBAISE.

Show these trappings to the rabble; I know thee When I write, if anything by chance be ex

| intimately inside and out. pressed correctly (though this, I must confess, is

TYRANTS. a rare bird), yet if anything be expressed correctly, I would not shrink from being praised; for my

O mighty father of the gods! when once dire breast is not made of horn: but I deny that that I lust, dyed with raging poison, has fired their “excellentlyand “beautifully" of yours is the

minds, vouchsafe to punish cruel tyrants in no end and object of what is right.

other way than this, that they see virtue and pine

| away at having forsaken her. PRAYERS.

This passage is thus paraphrased by Wyatt (“Ep. to Thou at least dost not with mercenary prayers

Poynes "):ask heaven for what thou wouldst not dare to

“None other payne pray I for them to be,

But, when the rage doth lead them from the right, name to the gods, unless in some corner. But

That, looking backward, Vertue they may see then the greater part of the nobles offer libations

E'en as she is, so goodly faire and bright!

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