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· INSIGNIFICANCY OF MAN.

he who, when he desires to eat, has not that which When I reflect upon it, what creatures are we he may eat. men! how insignificant!

THE POOR.
FREEMEN RATHER THAN SLAVES.

'Tis the nature of the poor to hate and envy Doubtless we all are freemen more willingly

men of property. than we live the life of slaves.

Thomson says:

Base envy withers at another's joy, GOOD.

And hates that excellence it cannot reach." Then at length we come to know our good, when

THE PEASANT. we have lost it.

For countrymen always harrow before they GREAT GENIUSES.

weed. How greatest geniuses oft lie conceald!

DEATH.

Death I esteem a trifle, when not merited by FORTITUDE.

evil actions. Our best support and succor in distress is forti- ! tude of mind.

VIRTUE.

He who dies for virtue's sake, does not perish. STRATAGEM. A stratagem is no stratagem if it be not artfully

SURE AS DEATH. planned.

To die is not more certain.
DECEITFULNESS OF MEN.

DEATH. This is too oft the way with most men;-while! There is no evil I need dread in death when they are suing for a favor, they are gracious; but death is over. Though I were to survive to the when once they have got it, from gracious they utmost age of man, yet the space of time to bear become surly and ready to take every advantage the hardships, with which you threaten me, would over you.

be short. THE CAUTIOUS ARE OFTEN TRICKED.

FATTED LAMB. And the most cautious, even when he thinks

And bid them bring forthwith a fatted lamb. He's most upon his guard, is often trick’d.

TOO LATE.
FORTUNE.

Go, fool, you come too late.
Fortune moulds and fashions human beings as
she chooses.

MAN REGARDLESS OF THOSE FROM WHOY NO

FAVOR IS TO BE RECEIVED.
GOD.

It is the usual way with men not to remember There is indeed a God, that hears and sees what

or know the man whose favor is worth nothing. e'er we do. So Hebrews iv. 13:

NO RUMOR IS WITHOUT FOUNDATION. “All things are naked and open unto the eyes of Him with

Flame follows very close on smoke. whom we have to do."

The Spaniards say:LOSS AT TIMES TO BE PREFERRED TO GAIN.

“Where fire is made, smoke arises." I do not regard every kind of gain as service

LABOR ATTENDS EVERY PURSUIT. able to man. I know that gain has raised many to high eminence. There are times, however,

| He who would eat the kernel, must crack the when loss should be preferred to gain.

shell.

LOVE.
KINDNESS TO THE GOOD.
The kindnesses that are done to the good, thanks

It is good to love in a moderate degree; to dis

traction, it is not good. for the same, are pregnant with blessings.

BLESSINGS.
HIS OWN DEAR TO EVERY ONE.

No blessing lasts forever.
Mine to me is dear;
Dear is his own to every one.

A REASONABLE LOVER.

Find me a reasonable lover against his weight THE WRETCHED.

in gold. Wretched is the man who is in search of something to eat and finds that with difficulty, but

THE PROVIDENT. more wretched is he who both seeks with diffi-| The man who has got rich speedily, must speedculty and finds nothing at all; most wretched is lily be provident or speedily will starve.

DEATH.

Gueudeville, in his translation, says that this was a favorite

OLD MÉN. maxim of Louis XII. of France.

But truth it is, we old folks sometimes dote. ABUSE.

A FRIEND IN NEED. If abuse be uttered against those who do not deserve it, that I consider to be abuse; but if it be There is nothing more desirable to a man than a uttered against those who are deserving, it is fair friend in need.' censure, in my way of thinking, at least.

MENTAL AGONY." So Shakespeare (“Romeo and Juliet,” act ii. sc. 3):"Nor aught so good, but, strained from that fair use, If there be any misery for which a man ought Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse."

to be pitied, it is when the malady is in his mind.

This I experience when many shapes of ill assail AN UNLUCKY DAY.

me: many forms of sorrow, poverty, fear, alarm Upon my word, this day certainly has turned my innocent mind. out both perverse and adverse for me.

SMELL.
A MADMAN.

Puppies have one smell, pigs quite another. • The world calls me mad, when they are all mad

TO REAP EVIL FOR GOOD. together.

How hard it is, when you reap a harvest of evil

for good that you have done. Food for death.

COAXING IS MERE BIRD-LIMF. A LOVER INSENSIBLE TO EVERYTHING BUT LOVE. Your coaxing is mere bird-lime.

He that is in love, faith, if he be hungry, is not hungry at all.

MAN PROPOSES.

Man proposes, God disposes.
LOVE.
Love has both its gall and honey in abundance;

A FRIEND. it has sweetness to the taste, but it presents bit- A man, your friend, who is a friend such as the terness also to satiety.

name imports-except the gods-nothing does ex

cel him. NO BLISS PERPETUAL. Such is the state of all things human, that no

THE UNGRATEFUL. bliss of man is perpetual.

For, by Pollux! nothing is, in my opinion, more

base than an ungrateful man. It is better that a SAIL SHIFTED ACCORDING TO THE WIND. thief should escape, than that a generous friend Whichever way the wind blows at sea, in that should be forsaken. It is

wind blowe at con in that should be forsaken. It is better to be extravagant, direction the sail is shifted.

than to be called ungrateful. Good men will

praise that, even bad men will condemn the latter. WISDOM.

MODESTY. 'Tis better for one to know more than he utters.

For him I reckon lost, who's lost to shame. A FRIEND IN NEED.

Diphilus (Fr. Com. Gr. p. 1093, M.) says:The man that comforts a desponding friend

“There is no creature more bold than the shameless." With words alone, does nothing. He's a friend

FALSE FRIENDS. Indeed, who proves himself a friend in need.

There are many of such life and manners, who, USELESS TO BE BOUNTEOUS IN WORDS. when you think them friends, are found most What does it signify your being bounteous in

false, profuse in promises, sparing in deeds, of inwords, if all real aid be dead and gone?

firm faith. There are none of them who do not

envy those whom fortune prospers: by their inI HAVE NO INTEREST IN THE MATTER. dolence they take good care to escape all envy. There is neither sowing nor reaping for me in

A WORTHLESS MAN. this matter.

I set little value on the esteem of a worthless A GOOD LAWYER.

man. He will be able to take all due precautions, who

DEATH IN YOUTH. understands the laws and ordinances.

He whom the gods love dies young, while he is THE MIND.

in health, has his senses and his judgment sound. It were right that a man should hold up a mir- Theognis (425) says:ror not only to his face, but to his mind; that hel. “I

"It is indeed the best thing of all for mortals not to be might see the very heart of his discretion, and

born nor to see the rays of the bright sun; but if born to

enter as speedily as possible the gates of Pluto, and Ito lie judge its power and extent.

I down with much earth heaped upon him."

TROUBLES.

WOMAN FULL OF WILES. Know this, that troubles come on us swifter She has a lying tongue, a wit that is ripe for much than things we wish.

mischief, an undaunted assurance; she has at

home within herself a mind fraught with false TRUTH.

words, false actions, and false oaths. For a I love truth, and wish to have it always spoken

woman, if she is-bent on ill, never goes begging to to me: I hate a liar.

the gardener for material; she has a garden at home

and a stock of her own for all mischievous con. THINGS UNHOPED FOR.

trivances. Things we hope not for oftener come to pass

IGNORANCE IS SOMETIMES BEST. than things we wish for.

Know not what you know, and see not what you

see. “TO WHITEN A BLACKAMOOR."

Kirke White says: It is the same as if you were to try to whiten

“Oh Ignorance ivory with ink.

Thou art fallen man's best friend." This is applied to those whose design is good, but marred in

GOOD COUNSEL. the execution,

For a well-devised plan is very often filched WOMAN'S BEST SMELL.

away, if the place for speaking be not chosen with A woman's best smell is to smell of nothing. care and caution; for if the enemy learn your For these your anointed hags, who still new vamp plans, they can tie your tongue and bind your themselves, and hide their wrinkles with paint, hands with your own counsel, and do the same to when once the sweat and perfume mix, will stink you that you intended to do to them, worse than the greasy compound, when a cook pours all his broths together.

JUST AND GOOD.

The sway is easy o’er the just and good.
MISCONDUCT.
Ill conduct soils the finest ornaments worse than

GREEN OLD AGE. dirt.

What though his hair be gray, he is not old in

mind. PROCRASTINATION IS BAD. It is a miserable thing to be digging a well at

HE WHO FINDS FAULT WITH THE GODS. the moment when thirst has seized your throat. He who would blame the designs of the gods,

must be foolish and ignorant. STEADINESS. It does not matter a feather whether a man be

A GUEST. supported by patron or client, if he himself wants No one can be such a welcome guest in the steadiness and courage.

house of a friend, that he will not become a bore

when he has stayed three continuous days. GUILTY CONSCIENCE. Nothing so wretched as a guilty conscience.

WISDOM.

Every man, however wise, requires the advice of A LIE.

some sagacious friend in the affairs of life.. By Hercules! I have often heard that your piping-hot lie is the best of lies: what the gods dictate,

WOMAN. that is right.

If a woman has any malicious mischief to do, in

that case her memory is immortal in remembering MASTERS AND SERVANTS.

it forever; if any good or honorable deed is to As servants wish their masters to be, such is he

be done, it will fall out that those same women wont to be. Masters are good to the good, severe become oblivious that instant and cannot rememto him who is bad.

ber.

DANGEROUS TO GO TO LAW.

TO DROWN HIS VOICE BY TALKING.
You little know what a ticklish thing it is to go! You drown his voice by your talking.
to law.
ADVICE FROM SACRED TEMPLES.

WHAT WE ARE ASHAMED OF. Counsels are of higher sanction when taken in We bear with more ease what we are ashamed sacred places.

of, than what we are vexed at. A HANDSOME MAN.

COMPLAIN TO YOUR STEPMOTHER. · 'Tis really a very great plague to be too hand Complain to your stepmother. some a man.

This is a hard hit at stepmothers.

LABOR LOST.

GOOD WINE REQUIRES NO BUSH. All we say is just like pouring water into a To unsaleable wares we must try to entice the sieve. Our labor is all in vain.

buyer; good wares easily find a purchaser, al

though they be hid in a corner. TALE-BEARERS. Your tittle-tattlers, and those who listen to

A TARDY FRIEND. slander, by my good will, should all be hanged

Nothing is more annoying than a tardy friend... the former by their tongues, the latter by the ears. COURAGE IN A DANGEROUS CRISIS.

YOU ARE AS SLOW AS A SNAIL. Courage in danger is half of the crisis got over. You have surpassed a snail in slowness.

RICH MEN.

TO SEE THROUGH A CLOUD DARKLY.

A GUIDE. There are some things respecting which we The man who does not know his way to the sea, wish to question you, which we ourselves know should always take a river for his guide. and have heard imperfectly as through a cloud.

TO DO GOOD TO THE BAD.
THE MOTE IN YOUR OWN EYE.

To do good to the bad is a danger just as great Do you never look back at yourself, when you as to do bad to the good. If thou doest good to. abuse another person ?

the bad, the benefit is lost. FORTUNE. It is the goddess Fortune alone that gets the better of a hundred wise heads; and there is truth

| But such is the disposition of all those rich peoin this, that according as each takes advantage of

fple of ours: serve them, their thanks are lighter her, he advances in life, and hence we all declare

than a feather; offend them, their vengeance falls that such an one is a man of sense: when we hear"

like lead. of a man being successful, that, in our eyes, is a proof of wisdom; when he fails, he is a fool. Fools

ILL GOT, ILL SPENT. that we are, when we pray the gods to grant us | For what is ill got is ill spent. what we wish, we know not, or if we do, it is in vain, what will be to our advantage. We lose a

GOD. certainty and grasp a shadow. What follows, but

| Great Jove! who dost preserve and guard manthat in the midst of labors and sorrows, death

kind, by whom we live and breathe this vital air, creeps upon us in the interim.

on whom depends the hope of human life, grant WINE TRIPS US UP.

this day to be prosperous to my fortunes. This is the great fault in wine: it first trips up! THE GREATEST FAULT OF WOMEN. the feet, it is a cunning wrestler.

Many are the faults of women; but of the many, WOMAN.

this one is the greatest, to please themselves too

much and to give their attention too little to The man, who wants to be fully employed, I pleasing the

any employed, pleasing the men. should procure a woman and a ship; for no two things produce more trouble-if perchance you

THE UNGRATEFUL. begin to rig them, these two things can never be

Thou lovest nothing at all, when thou art in rigged enough.

love with one, who does not return it. GOLDEN MEAN. In everything the golden mean is best: all things

DISGRACE ADDED TO POVERTY. in excess are a plague.

If 'disgrace be added to poverty, poverty must

be more unendurable, our character more frail. EXCESSIVE OUTLAY. For no profits can arise, if the outlay exceeds

SLANDER.

For enemies carry about slander not in the form A GOOD DISPOSITION.

in which it took its rise. A good disposition I far prefer to gold; for gold is the gift of fortune; goodness of disposition is

DISGRACE. the gift of nature. I prefer much rather to be Disgrace is immortal, and lives when one would called good than fortunate.

think it dead.

them.

EVIL HABITS.

ATTENTION. Evil habits soil a fine dress more than mud; If thou attendest to any matter with steadiness good manners, by their deeds, easily set off a lowly or with good management, it usually succeeds to garb.

! thy satisfaction.

PRIDE.

THE GODS.

THE SLOTHFUL. The man to whom the gods are propitious, they Most worthless is the man that is slothful, and throw some profit in his way.

most detestably do I hate that kind of man. It

behoves him to be vigilant who wishes to do his EXPERIENCE.

duty in good time. It is sweeter to gain wisdom from other's woes,

THE SEA. than others should learn from ours.

The sea is assuredly common to all. THE WORTHLESS, For worthless is the man, who knows how to WHEN A WOMAN'S GOOD DISPOSITIONS ARE DISreceive a kindness, and knows not how to return

COVERED. it.

When is it best discerned a woman has good

dispositions ? When she, who has the power of REGISTER OF GOOD AND EVIL DEEDS.

doing ill, refrains from doing it. Jove, supreme sovereign of gods and men, scatters us among nations to mark the people's ac

THE BUSY-BODY. tions, manners, piety, and faith, that each may For the busy-body is ever ill-natured. find reward according to his virtues; those 'who suborn false witnesses to gain a villanous suit in law, who shuffle off due payments by false swear

High airs befit prosperous fortune. . ing, their names written down, we return to Jove: each day he is informed of those that call for

PROSPERITY. vengeance.

According as men thrive, their friends are true; Euripides (Fr. Melan. 12) says:

if their affairs go to wreck, their friends sink with “A. Do you think that the wicked deeds of men fly on wings up to the gods, there to be written down in the port

them. Fortune finds friends.

them folio of Jove, and that Jove looks at them assigning punishment for each! Why, the whole of heaven would not be able

EVIL MANNERS, to contain the sins of mankind, so numerous are they, nor would he be able to read and affix the penalty to each; but Evil manners, like well-watered plants, have vengeance dwells very close to us, if we will only look. B. shot up in abundance. O woman, the gods inflict punishment on those whom they hate, since wickedness is not agreeable to them."

EVIL KNOWN IS BEST.
WICKED MEN.

Keep what you've got: the evil that we know is

best. Wicked men fondly imagine that they can appease Jove with gifts and sacrifice, losing both

Euripides (Fr. Antiop. 7) says:their labor and their money: this is so; because

“I feel what I suffer, and that is no small evil: for not to

feel that you are ill has some pleasure: ignorance of misfortno petition of the perjured is acceptable to him.

ou or the perjurea is acceptable to him. unes has some advantage." The good will sooner find pardon from above, in praying to the gods, than he that is wicked.

THE GOOD OUGHT TO KEEP SUSPICION FROM

THEMSELVES.
OTHERS' MISFORTUNES.

It becomes all good men and women to be on The storied miseries of men's mishaps

their guard, and keep even the suspicion of guilt (How sad soe'er relation sets them forth),

away. Are far less sharp than those we know and feel

FRIENDS. Ourselves from sore experience.

There are, I know are friends; there are, I think UNEXPECTED GOOD.

so; there are, whose dispositions and minds I canFor I know good oft befalls us when we least!

not know, or whether to enrol them among my expect it : and true it is, that when we trust in

friends or foes. But you I hold of all my fast hope, we are often disappointed.

friends the most steadfast.

BUSY-BODIES.
EQUANIMITY.

In truth there is nothing more foolish or more A well-balanced mind is the best remedy against

stupid, nothing more lying, or indeed more tataffliction.

tling, more self-conceited, or more forsworn, thanı

those men of the city everlastingly gossiping THE GODS MAKE SPORT OF MEN.

about, whom they call busy-bodies. . And I too In wondrous ways the gods make sport of men, should rank with them, who have been the swaland in wondrous fashions they send dreams in lower of the false tales of those who pretend that sleep.

they know everything, and yet know nothing.

They know, forsooth, your thoughts present and UNEXPECTED GOOD.

future. They know what the king whispered in For I know that much good befalls many con- the ear of the queen: that which neither is, nor is trary to expectation,

| likely to be, do these fellows know.

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