The Supreme Court's Constitution: An Inquiry Into Judicial Review and Its Impact on Society

앞표지
Transaction Publishers, 1987 - 215페이지

The U.S. Court has exercised enormous influence on American society throughout its history. Although the Court is considered the guardian of the Constitution, the Constitution does not specifically set forth the Court's power to strike down federal or state legislation, nor does it provide guidance on how this power should be applied. In this critical examination of Supreme Court opinions, Bernard Siegan argues that the Court has frequently ruled both contrary to and without guidance from Constitutional meaning and purpose. He concludes that the U.S. Supreme Court has increasingly become more the maker than the interpreter of fundamental law. The author offers a detailed analysis of the Constitution and numerous Supreme Court cases involving controversial issues ranging from the line between federal and state powers to the validity of measures according to preferential treatment for minorities and women. The book is essential reading for everyone interested in understanding the differences between activist and literalist traditions in the high court.

도서 본문에서

다른 사람들의 의견 - 서평 쓰기

서평을 찾을 수 없습니다.

선택된 페이지

목차

II
1
III
21
IV
41
V
89
VI
113
VII
135
VIII
149
IX
163
X
179
XI
183
XII
205
XIII
213
저작권

기타 출판본 - 모두 보기

자주 나오는 단어 및 구문

도서 문헌정보