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THE CHAUTAUQUAN

A Monthly Magazine devoted to the Promotion of True

Culture Organ of the Chautauqua Literary

and Scientific Circle.

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VOLUME II.

From October, 1881, to July, 1882.

THEODORE L. FLOOD, D. D., Editor.

PRINTED ON THE CHAUTAUQUA PRESS,
MEADVILLE, PA.

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COPYRIGHTED BY THEODORE L. FLOOD, IN THE OFFICE OF THE LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS, WASHINGTON, D. C.,

1882.

INDEX TO VOLUME II.

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D

DECEMBER AND JUNE. Poem. By "B."

229.

E

EDITOR'S NOTE BOOK. 60, 125, 185, 244,
306, 374, 437, 499, 557, 613.

EDITOR'S OUTLOOK: The Second Vol-

Chautauqua for 1882; The Labor

Troubles; Organic Union in Church-

es; The Temperance Question. 611.

EDITOR'S TABLE. Questions and An-

swers. 61, 126, 186, 245, 308, 376, 438,
501, 559, 615.
ELECTRICITY THE FORCE OF THE FU-
TURE. By John A. Bower. 91,

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J

JESUS CHRIST IN CHRONOLOGY. By
Rev. Ira J. Bidwell. 195.
JAMESTOWN AND CHAUTAUQUA LAKE.
By Rev. A. N. Craft, A. M. 585.

K

KING'S DAUGHTER, The. By A. H. Bur-
lingham, D. D. 535.

L

LAVENGRO-A Dream or Drama; a
Scholar, a Gypy and a Priest. By
George Borrow. 165, 212, 279, 344,
408, 473, 538, 588.
LAKESIDE, OHIO. 560.

LEISURE HOURS. From the Spectator.
By Addison. 137.

LINES BY THE LATE DEAN OF WEST-
MINSTER. 25.

LOCAL CIRCLES. By A. M. Martin,
Esq. 50, 117, 175, 225, 299, 359, 430,
486, 552, 607.
LOVING FACES. Poem. By "R. H. S."

212.
LOOK-UP-LEGION. By Rev. E. E. Hale.
303, 439.

LUTHER'S HAMMER. Poem. By "R.

H. S." 20.

M

MAN WITH THE DRUMMER BOY, The.
By Rev. B. Waugh. 495.
MATTER AND VITALITY. By the Rev.
H. H. Moore. 94.

MEMORIAL DAYS. 177, 435, 492.
MISSING SCIENCE, A. 289.
MOSAICS OF HISTORY. By Prof. Arthur
Gilman, M. A. 5, 67, 129, 189, 251,
315, 379, 443, 503.
MONTEREY C. L. S. C. ASSEMBLY. By

Mrs. M. H. Field. 52.
MOUNTAIN OF MISERIES, The. A dream.
From Addison. 389.

MY RETURN TO ARCADY, AND HOW I

FIND THINGS LOOKING. By Dr.

Augustus Jessopp. 33,

MY LOST YOUTH. Poem. By Henry W.
Longfellow. 496.
MYTHOLOGY IN HISTORY. By C. F.
Keary. 273.

468.

NEIGHBORS. Poem. 103.

NEW ENGLAND ASSEMBLY NORMAL

CLASS. 248.

NEW EDUCATIONS. By Bishop H. W.

Warren. 338.

NEVER, FOREVER. A Tribute to Long-
fellow. By Mrs. Emily J. Bugbee.
466.

PROPHECY FULFILLED. By Jennie L.

Eno. 415.

PREPARATORY CLASS C. L. S. C. 55.
PRIMARY TEACHERS-Successful in the
competitive Examinations at Chau-
tauqua, N. Y., and South Framing-
ham, Mass. 248.

S

SACREDNESS OF PROPERTY. By R. W.

Dale, M. A. 466.

SACREDNESS OF THE SECULAR CALL-
ING. By Rev. J. Baldwin Brown,
B. A. 293.
SANCTUM KING, The. Poem. By Will
617.
SEPOY REBELLION. By Rev. Wm. But-
ler, D. D. 422.

Carlton.

SHE WAS A PHANTOM. Poem. By Wm.

Wordsworth. 86.

SIMILE, A. Poem. By Matthew Prior.

109.
SOME WONDERS OF THE SEA. By Rev.
J. G. Wood, M. A. 100.
SOME REGRETFUL WORDS. By Ella
Farnam Pratt. 365.

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT. 494.

STORIES FOR THE CHILDREN. By John

B. Gough. 163.

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THE CHAUTAUQUAN.

A MONTHLY MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO THE PROMOTION OF TRUE CULTURE. ORGAN OF THE CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC CIRCLE.

No. I.

OCTOBER, 1881.

Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle. glimmer into warmth; Athens ascending into daylight,

and Egypt sinking into shadow; learning setting over Greece to rise upon Italy; and dying at Rome to be rekindled at Bagdad: these are visions to dazzle the eyes, and people the fancy of a poet.*

VOL. II.

President, J. H. Vincent, D. D., Plainfield, N. J.
General Secretary, Albert M. Martin, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Office Secretary, Miss Kate F. Kimball, Plainfield, N. J.
Counselors, Lyman Abbott, D. D.; J. M. Gibson, D. D.; Bishop H.
W. Warren, D. D.; W. C. Wilkinson, D. D.

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The cavernous unsounded East

Outpours an evil tide,
Drowning the hymn of patriarch priest,
The chant of shepherd bride.
How can we catch the angel-word,
How mark the prophet-sound?

--Lord Houghton.

THE CHARMS OF HISTORY.-History presents the pleasantest features of poetry and fiction; the majesty of the epic; the moving accidents of the drama; the surprises and moral of the romance. Wallace is a ruder Hector; Robinson Crusoe is not stranger than Croesus; the knights of Ashby never burnish the page of Scott with richer lights of lance and armor, than the Carthaginians, winding down the Alps, cast upon Livy. Froissart's hero has all the minute painting of Richardson's. The poetic element is the life-blood of the narrative. The gazette glows into the drama; the pen-and-ink scrawl into the portrait.*

THREE PHASES OF HISTORY.-History may be considered in three lights-a pleasurable, an educational, and a moral: (1) As it entertains the fancy; (2) opens new sources of instruction; (3) and cherishes, or enlarges the feelings of virtue. In the first light, its poetical relationship is clearly marked. Imagination creates no grander episodes than the rise and fall of empires. To watch the first smiles and motions of national life in its cradle; to trace its growth, the maturity, and the decline of kingdoms; to observe one side of the world brightening in the sun of civilization, while the other is vapory and cold; to see, in the course of years, the flourishing region become dim, and the dark country

*Willmott's "Pleasures of Literature,"

History is to be regarded in an educational light, as it opens new sources of information. A scholar may be six thousand years old, and have learned brick-making under Pharaoh. Never lived such a citizen of the world; he was Assyrian at Babylon, Lacedæmonian at Sparta, Roman at Rome, Egyptian at Alexandria. He has been by turns a traveller, a merchant, a man of letters, and a commanderin-chief; presented at every court, he knew Daniel, and sauntered through the picture-gallery of Richelieu. Dryden called history a perspective glass, carrying the mind to a vast distance, and taking in the remotest objects of antiquity.

How many battles by sea and land the student has witnessed! He clambered with the Greeks along the rocky shore of Pylus; he heard the roar of falling houses when the Turks stormed Rhodes; three times he was beaten back with Condé by that terrible Spanish infantry, which tossed off the French fire like foam from a cliff; he recognized Dante in the struggle of Campaldino; stood by the side of Cervantes when an arquebus carried away his left hand; and stooped with a misty lantern over the bleeding body of Moore.

A cultivated reader of history is domesticated in all famiThe lies; he dines with Pericles, and sups with Titian. Athenian fish-bell often invites him to the market to cheapen a noisy poulterer, or exchange compliments with a bakeress of inordinate fluency. A monk illuminating a missal, and Caxton pulling his first proof, are among the pleasant entries of his diary. He still stops his ears to the bellowing of Cleon; and remembers, as of yesterday, the rhetorical frown of the old tapestry, and the scarlet drapery of Pitt.

To study history is to study literature. The biography of a nation embraces all its works. No trifle is to be neglected. A mouldering medal is a letter of twenty centuries. Antiquities, which have been beautifully called history defaced, compose its fullest commentary. In these wrecks of many storms, which time washes to the shore, the scholar looks patiently for treasure. The painting round a vase, the scribble on a wall, the wrath of a demagogue, the drollery of a farce, the point of an epigram-each possesses its own interest and value. A fossil court of law is dug out of an

orator; and the Pompeii of Greece is discovered in the comedies of Aristophanes.*

The third aspect of history is the moral, as it cherishes the feelings of virtue, and enlarges their action. Southey felt confident that Clarendon, put into his youthful hands, would have preserved him from the political follies which he lived to regret and outgrow. Guicciardini, also, has

*Willmott's "Pleasures of Literature,"

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