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The nature of bad news infects the teller. Id. To infer is nothing but, by virtue of one propo-
The will dotes, that is inclinable

sition laid down as true, to draw in another as true,
To what infectiously itself affects. Id. i.e. to see or suppose such a connection of the two
Infected minds
ideas of the inferred proposition.

Locke. To their deaf pillows will discharge their secrets.

Full well hath Clifford played the orator,

Id.
What a strange infection

Inferring arguments of mighty force.

Shakspeare. Is fallen into thy ear! Id. Cymbeline. The transmission or emission of the thinner and

Vomits infer some small detriment to the lungs. more airy parts of bodies, as in odours and infections,

Harvey. is, of all the rest, the most corporeal ; but withal One would wonder how, from so differing prethere be a number of those emissions, both whole. mises, they should all infer the same conclusion. some and unwholesome, that give no smell at all.

Decay of Piety. Bacon. Some known diseases are infectious, and others are

Yet what thou can'st attain, which best may not: those that are infectious are such as are chiefly to glorify the Maker, and infer in the spirits, and not so much in the humours, and Thee also happier, shall not be withheld therefore pass easily from body to body; such as pestilences and lippitudes.

Milton.
Id.

Thy hearing
The love-tale

Though it may chance to be righ: in the conclu-
Infected Sion's daughters with like heat. sion, it is yet unjust and mistaken in the method of

Milton.
inference.

Glanville. True love, well considered, hath an infective

These inferences or conclusions are the effects of power.

Sidney.
One of those fantastical mind-infected people, that reasoning; and the three propositions

, taken all tochildren and musicians call lovers.

gether, are called syllogism or argument. Watts.

Id. Take in a new infection to the heart,

The reasoning power vouchsafed, of course inAnd the rank poison of the old will die. Otway.

ferred Infectious as impure, your blighting power

The power to clothe that reason with his word. Taints in its rudiments the promised Hower.

Couper. Conversation. Cowper. Conversation.

Such was the theoretical inference of the house of And a rotten harvest

commons in 1648, the logical dependance of which Of discontents infecting the fair soil,

upon the foregoing proposition, I say I should be Making a desert of fertility.

glad to see logically disproved. The practical inByron's Sardanapalus. ferences were not tardy in their arrival after the For the mind theory.

Canning Succumbs to long infection and despair And vulture passions flying close behind,

INFERIÆ, sacrifices offered by the Greeks Await the moment to assail and tear.

and Romans to the Dii manes, or the souls of Id. Prophecy of Dante.

deceased heroes (See Manes), or even any relaFrom mental mists to purge a nation's eyes ; tion or person whose memory was held in veneTo animate the weak, unite the wise ;

ration. These sacrifices consisted of honey, To trace the deep infection that pervades

water, wine, milk, the blood of victims, variety The crowded town, and taints the rural shades.

of balsamic unguents, chaplets, and loose flowers. Canning. New Morality.

The victims upon these occasions were geneINFECTION, in medicine. See Contagion. rally of the smaller cattle, though in ancient INFECUND,

adj. Lat. infæcundus. Un- times they sacrificed slaves or captives. The ISFECUN'DITY, n. s. Š fruitful; unproductive ; sacrifices were usually black and barren. The infertile.

altars were holes dug in the ground. The honey, How safe and agreeable a conservatory the earth water, wine, &c., were used as libations, and is to vegetables, is manifest from their rotting, dry- were poured on the tombs of children by chiling, or being rendered infecund in the waters, or the dren, on those of virgins by virgins, and on air; but in the earth their vigour is long preserved. those of married men by women. The inferiæ

Derham's Physico-Theology. were offered on the ninth and thirtieth days after INFELICʻITY, n. s. Fr. infelicité ; Lat. infe- interment amongst the Greeks, and repeated in licitas. Unhappiness; misery; calamity.

the month Anthesterion. All that she can devyse both be nyght and dey

INFERIOR’ITY, n. s. Fr. inferieur ; Lat. Shall be to make her childryn heirs of that she may

INFEʻRIOR, adj. & n. s. inferior. Lower state And eke sowe sedes of infelicite,

INFER'NAL, adj. of dignity, place, or Wher of wold growe devysioune betwene yewe and INFER'NAL-STONE, N. S.

value: lower in exChaucer. The Merchantes Second Tale.

cellence; subordinate: inferior, one in a lower Whatever is the ignorance and infelicity of the rank : infernal, hellish; detestable. Infernalpresent state, we were made wise and happy. stone, or the lunar caustic, is prepared from an

Glanville.

evaporated solution of silver, or from crystals of Here is our great infelicity, that, when single words silver : it is a very powerful caustic, eating signify complex ideas, one word can never distinctly away the flesh and even the bones to which it is manifest all the parts of a complex idea.

Watts,

applied. INFER', v. a. Fr. inferer ; Lat. infero.

Ye furies all IX'FERENCE, n. S. To induce; to bring on; Whiche for ben undie us, nigh the nether pole,

INFER'IBLE, adj. Sto offer, or produce. In- Where Pluto reigneth—o kyng infernall ! ference, a conclusion drawn from previous argu- Sende out thine Arpies. Idents. Inferible, deducible from the premises.

Chaucer. The Remedie of Lore.

me.

render it capable of withstanding the shock of only been in use since the middle of the sevencavalry, they gave the soldiers breast-plates and teenth century. They have no camp equipage to helmets, as defensive armour, together with long carry, and their arms and accoutrements are much spears, halberts, and heavy swords, as weapons lighter than those of the infantry. Light infantry of offence. They formed them into large bat- are the eyes of a general, and wherever there is talions, ranged in deep and close array, so that found light cavalry, there should be light inthey might present on every side a formidable fantry. They should be accustomed to the pace front to the enemy. The men at arms could of four miles an hour, as their usual marching make no impression on the solid strength of such pace, and be able to march at five miles an a body. It repulsed the Austrians in all their hour upon particular occasions. Every regiment attempts to conquer Switzerland. It broke the has a company of light infantry, whose station is Burgundian gendarmerie, which was scarcely on the left of the regiment, the right being ocinferior to that of France, either in number or cupied by the grenadiers. reputation; and, when first called to act in İNFARCTION, n. s. Lat. in and farcio. Italy, it bore down, by its irresistible force, Stuffing; constipation. every enemy that attempted to oppose it. These An hypochondriack consumption is occasioned by repeated proofs of the decisive effects of infantry, an infarction and obstruction of the spleen. exhibited on such conspicuous occasions, restored

Harvey. that service to reputation, and gradually re-esta

INFATUATE, adj. ? Lat. infatuo, from in blished the opinion which had been long ex- INFATUA’TION, n. s. I and fatuus ; Fr. infaploded, of its superior importance in the opera- tuer. To strike with folly; to deprive of undertions of war. But, the glory the Swiss had standing; deprivation of reason. acquired having inspired them with such high had long overspread the infatuated, gentile world:

It is the reforming of the vices and sottishness that ideas of their own prowess and consequence as frequently rendered them mutinous and insolent,

a prime branch of that design of Christ's sending his disciples.

Hammond. the princes who employed them became weary

Where men give themselves over to the defence of of depending on the caprice of foreign merce

wicked interests, and false propositions, it is just naries, and began to turn their attention towards with God to smite the greatest abilities with the the improvement of their national infantry.

greatest infatuations.

South. The German powers, having the command of The people are so universally infatuated with the men whom nature has endowed with that steady notion, that, if a cow falls sick, it is ten to one but an courage and persevering strength which form old woman is clapt up in prison for it. them to be soldiers, soon modelled their troops

Addison on Italy. in such a manner, that they vied with the Swiss The carriage of our atheists or dei ts is amazing : both in discipline and valor.

no dotage so infatuate, no phrensy so extravagant as

theirs. The French monarchs, though more slowly

Bentley.

All are the sons of circumstance; awayand with greater difficulty, accustomed the im

Let's seek out, or prepare to be petuous spirit of their people to subordination

Tortured for his infatuation, and and discipline; and were at such pains to render

Condemned without a crime. their national infantry respectable, that, as early

Byron. Sardanapalus. as the reign of Louis XII., several gentlemen of INFAUST'ING, n. s. Lat. infaustus. The high rank had so far abandoned their ancient act of making unlucky. An odd and inelegant ideas as to condescend to enter into their ser- word. vice.

As the king did in some part remove the envy The Spaniards, whose situation made it diffi- from himself, so he did not observe, that he did cult to employ any other than their national withal bring a kind of malediction and infausting troops in the southern parts of Italy, which was upon the marriage, as an ill prognostick. Bacon. the chief scene of their operations in that coun- INFEA'SIBLE, adj. In and feasible. Imtry, not only adopted the Swiss discipline, but practicable; not to be done. improved upon it, by mingling a proper number This is so difficult and infeasible, that it may well

Glanville. of soldiers, armed with heavy muskets, in their drive modesty to despair of science. battalions; and thus formed that famous body

INFECT", ".a.

Fr. infecter; Lat. inof infantry, which, during a century and a half,

INFECTION, n. s. fectus. To act upon was the admiration and terror of all Europe.

Infectious, adj. by contagion; to affect The Italian states gradually diminished the

INFECTIOUSLY, udv. with communicated number of their cavalry, and, in imitation of

INFECʻTIOUSNESS, n. s. l qualities; to hurt by their more powerful neighbours, brought the

INFECTIVE, adj. contagion; to taint; strength of their armies to consist in foot-soldiers. to poison ; to pollute; to fill with something From this period the nations of Europe have contagious. Infection, taint; poison; morbid carried on war with forces more adapted to every miasma. Infectious, influencing by communispecies of service, more capable of acting in cation. Infective, having the quality of acting every country, and better fitted both for making by contagion.

But wel wote I, my lady graunted me conquests, and for preserving them. INPANTRY, HEAVY-ARMED, among the an

Truly to be my woundes remedy ;

Hire gentilnesse may not infected be cients, were such as wore a complete suit of ar

With doublenesse : thus, trust I til I die mour, and engaged with broad shields and long

So cast 1 Voide Dispaires company, spears. They were the flower and strength of

And taken Hope to council and to frende. the Grecian armies, and, had the highest rank of

Chaucer. The Court of Love, military bonor.

Thine eyes, sweet lady, have infected mine. ! NFANTRY, Light, among the moderns, have

Shakspeare.

.

serve

The nature of bad news infects the teller. Id. To infer is nothing but, by virtue of one propo-
The will dotes, that is inclinable

sition laid down as true, to draw in another as true, To what infectiously itself affects. Id.

i.e. to see or suppose such a connection of the two Infected minds ideas of the inferred proposition.

Locke. To their deaf pillows will discharge their secrets.

Full well hath Clifford played the orator,

Id.
What a strange infection

Inferring arguments of mighty force.

Shakspeare. Is fallen into thy ear! Id. Cymbeline. The transmission or emission of the thinner and

Vomits infer some small detriment to the lungs. more airy parts of bodies, as in odours and infections,

Harvey. is, of all the rest, the most corporeal ; but withal One would wonder how, from so differing prethere be a number of those emissions, both whole- mises, they should all infer the same conclusion. some and unwholesome, that give no smell at all.

Decay of Piety. Bacon. Some known diseases are infectious, and others are

Yet what thou can'st attain, which best may not: those that are infectious are such as are chiefly in the spirits, and not so much in the humours, and To glorify the Maker, and infer therefore pass easily from body to body; such as

Thee also happier, shall not be withheld pestilences and lippitudes.

Milton.
Id.

Thy hearing.
The love-tale

Though it may chance to be righ: in the concluInfected Sion's daughters with like heat. sion, it is yet unjust and mistaken in the method of Milton. inference.

Glanville, True love, well considered, hath an infective power.

Sidney.

These inferences or conclusions are the effects of One of those fantastical mind-infected people, that reasoning ; and the three propositions, taken all tochildren and musicians call lovers.

Watts. Id.

gether, are called syllogism or argument. Take in a new infection to the heart,

The reasoning power vouchsafed, of course inAnd the rank poison of the old will die. Otway.

ferred Infectious as impure, your blighting power

The power to clothe that reason with his word. Taints in its rudiments the promised fower.

Couper. Conversation. Cowper. Conversation.

Such was the theoretical inference of the house of And a rotten harvest

commons in 1648, the logical dependance of which Of discontents infecting the fair soil,

upon the foregoing proposition, I say I should be Making a desert of fertility.

glad to see logically disproved. The practical inByron's Sardanapalus. ferences were not tardy in their arrival after the For the mind theory.

Canning Succumbs to long infection and despair And vulture passions flying close behind,

INFERIÆ, sacrifices offered by the Greeks Await the moment to assail and tear.

and Romans to the Dii manes, or the souls of Id. Prophecy of Dante. deceased heroes (See Manes), or even any relaProm mental mists to purge a nation's eyes ; tion or person whose memory was held in veneTo animate the weak, unite the wise ;

ration. These sacrifices consisted of honey, To trace the deep infection that pervades water, wine, milk, the blood of victims, variety The crowded town, and taints the rural shades.

of balsamic unguents, chaplets, and loose flowers. Canning. New Morality. The victims upon these occasions were geneINFECTION, in medicine. See Contagion. rally of the smaller cattle, though in ancient INFECUND, adj. 2. Lat. infæcundus. Un- times they sacrificed slaves or captives. The

ISFECUN'DITY, n. s. Šfruitful; unproductive; sacrifices were usually black and barren. The infertile.

altars were holes dug in the ground. The honey, How safe and agreeable a conservatory the earth water, wine, &c., were used as libations, and is to vegetables, is manifest from their rotting, dry- were poured on the tombs of children by chiling, or being rendered infecund in the waters, or the dren, on those of virgins by virgins, and on air; but in the earth their vigour is long preserved. those of married men by women. The inferiæ

Derham's Physico-Theology. were offered on the ninth and thirtieth days after INFELICITY, n. s. Fr. infelicité ; Lat. infe- interment amongst the Greeks, and repeated in licitas. Unhappiness; misery; calamity.

the month Anthesterion. All that she can devyse both be nyght and dey

INFERIOR’ITY, n. s. Fr. inferieur ; Lat. Shall be to make her childryn heirs of that she may INFE'RIOR, adj. & n. s. inferior. Lower state And eke sowe sedes of infelicite,

INFER'NAL, adj. of dignity, place, or Wher of wold growe devysioune betwene yewe and INFER'NAL-STONE, n. s. value: lower in exChaucer. The Merchantes Second Tale,

cellence; subordinate: inferior, one in a lower Whatever is the ignorance and infelicity of the rank: infernal, hellish; detestable. Infernalpresent state, we were made wise and happy. stone, or the lunar caustic, is prepared from an

Glanville. evaporated solution of silver, or from crystals of Here is our great infelicity, that, when single words silver : it is a very powerful caustic, eating signify complex ideas, one word can never distinctly away the flesh and even the bones to which it is manifest all the parts of a complex idea.

Watts.

applied. INFER', v.a. Fr. inferer ; Lat. infero.

Ye furies all
INFERENCE, n. s. To induce; to bring on; Whiche for ben undie us, nigh the nether pole,

INFER'IBLE, adj. to offer, or produce. In- Where Pluto reigneth—o kyng infernall!
ference, a conclusion drawn from previous argu- Sende out thine Arpies.
menits. Inferible, deducible from the premises.

Chaucer. The Remedie of Lore.

me.

estate.

upon it.

Hail horrors, hail

INFESTIV'ITY, n. s. In and festivity. Infernal world, and thou profoundest hell Mournfulness; want of cheerfulness. Receive thy new possessor.

Milton.

INFES’TRED, adj. In and fester. RankRender me more equal, or perhaps

ling; inveterate. Obsolete. Superior, for inferior who is free!

Id. This cursed creature, mindful of that old The language, though not of equal dignity, yet as

Infestred grudge, the which his m ther felt, near approaching to it as our modern barbarism will

So soon as Clarion he did behold, allow; and therefore we are to rest contented with

His heart with vengeful malice inly swelt.

Spenser. that only inferiority which is not possibly to be remedied.

Dryden. INFEUDA’TION, n. s. Lat. in and feudum. His gigantick limbs with large embrace, The act of putting one in possession of a fee or Infolds nine acres of infernal space.

Id. Æneil.

Another military provision was conventional and The love of liberty with life is given, And life itself the inferiour gift of heaven.

by tenure, upon the infeudation of the tenant, and was usually called knight's service.

Hale. Dryden. A great person gets more by obliging his inferiour IN'FIDEL, n. s. 1 Fr. infidelle ; Lat. infithan by disdaining him.

South. INFIDEL'ITY, n. s. I delis. An unbeliever ; geGeneral and fundamental truths in philosophy, nerally applied to one who rejects Christianity : religion, and human life, conduct our thoughts into infidelity, want of faith; disbelief in revealed a thousand inferiour and particular propositions. religion: treachery; breach of contract or trust.

Watts.
Can it be?

Exhorting her, if she did marry, yet not to join Yon small blue circle swinging in far ether

herself to an infidel, as in those times some widows

christian had done, for the advancement of their esWith an inferior circlet near it still

tate in this world.

Hooker. Byron. Cain. Thy pride, thy wealth, thy freedom, and even that

What think you we are Turks or infidels ? The most infernal of all evils here,

Shakspeare. The sway of petty tyrants in a state.

One would fancy that infidels would be exempt Byron. Prophecy of Dante, Canto 4. from that single fault, which seems to grow out of There are other inferior properties which I shall the imprudent fervours of religion ; but so it is, that consider in due order. Canning. Microcosm.

infidelity is propagated with as much fierceness and INFERNAL REGIONS. See Elysium, Hell, contention, as if the safety of mankind depended and TARTARUS.

Addison's Spectator. INFERÄTILE, adj. ?

Fr. infertile ; Lat. in And well prepared by ignorance and sloth, INFERTILʻITY, n. š. I and fertilis

. Unfruit

By infidelity and love o' the world, ful; unproductive: want of fertility.

To make God's work a sinecure.

Cowper. The Petit- Maitre Clergyman. The same distemperature of the air that occasioned

As the black eunuch entered with his brace the plague, occasioned the infertility or noxiousness of the soil, whereby the fruits of the earth became

Of purchased Infidels, some raised their eyes either very small, or very unwholesome.

A moment without slackening from their pace. Hale's Origin of Mankind.

Byron. Don Juan. Ignorance being of itself, like stiff clay, an infer.

IN’FINITE, adj. Fr. infini ; Lat. intile soil, when pride comes to scorch and harden it,

IN'FINITELY, adv. finitus. Unbounded; it grows perfectly impenetrable.

IN'FINITENESS, n. s.

unlimited; without Government of the Tongue.

INFINITES'Imal, adj. Send; to a great deINFEST, Fr. infester ; Lat. infesto.

INFIN'ITIVE, adj. gree.

Infinitesimal, To harass; to disturb; to plague.

INFIN'ITUDE, n.s.

infinitely divided. InUnto my feeble breast

INFIN'ITY, n. s. finitive, in grammar, Come gently ; but not with that mighty rage

affirms, or intimates the intention of affirming, Wherewith the martial troops thou do'st infest,

which is one use of the indicative; but then it And hearts of greatest heroes do'st enrage.

does not do it absolutely.—Clarke. Infinitude,

Spenser. infinity; immensity; boundlessness: used in They ceased not, in the mean while, to strengthen an hyperbolical sense for an endless number. that part which in heart they favoured, and to infest An huge great beast it was, when it in length by all means, under colour of other quarrels, their Was stretched forth, that, nigh filled all the place, greatest adversities in this case.

Hooker. And seemed to be of infinite great strength. They were no mean, distressed calamitous persons

Spenser, Faerie Queene. that fled to him for refuge ; but of so great qua- Nothing may be infinitely desired, but that good lity, as it was apparent that they came not thither to which indeed is infinite.

Hooker. project their own fortune, but to infest and invade

This is Antonio, his.

Bacon's Henry VII.

To whom I am so infinitely bound.
But thou didst plead

Shakspeare. Divine impulsion, prompting how thou mightest There cannot be more infinities than one ; for one Find some occasion to infest our foes.

of them would limit the other. Raleigh's History. Milton. Samson Agonistes.

Let us always bear about us such impressions of Envy, avarice, superstition, love, with the like reverence, and fear of God, that we may humble cares and passions infest human life. Addison. ourselves before his Almightiness, and express that Plagues and palsy,

infinite distance between his infiniteness and ous Disease and pestilence, consume the robber, weaknesses.

Taylor. Infest bis blood, and wither every power.

Confusion heard his voice, and wild uproar Browne's Athelstan. Stood ruled stood vast infinitude confined. Milton.

V.a.

Young.

But what created mind can comprehend

are infinitely less than the rest; which being Their number or the wisdom infinite

neglected, as of no importance, the remaining That brought them forth, but hid their causes deep? terms form what is called the difference of the

Id. Though the repugnancy of infinitude be equally in this manner, as less than the other terms of

proposed quantity. The terms that are neglected incompatible to continued or successive motion, or continued quantity, and depends on the incompossi. the elements, are the very same which arise in bility of the very nature of things successive.or ex

consequence of the acceleration or retardation of tensive with infinitude ; yet that incompossibility is the generating motion during the infinitely small more conspicuous in discrete quantity, that ariseth time in which the element is generated; so that from parts actually distinguished.

Hale. the remaining terms express the elements that The cunning of his fattery the readiness of his would have been produced in that time, if the tears, the infiniteness of his vows, were but among generating motion had continued uniform: therethe weakest threads of his net.

Sidney. fore those differences are accurately in the same We see all the good sense of the age cut out, and ratio to each other, as the generating motions minced into almost an infinitude of distinctions.

or fluxions. And hence, though in this method

Addison's Spectator. Thou sovereign power, whose secret will controuls the conclusions are accurately true, without even

infinitesimal parts of the elements are neglected, The inward bent and motion of our souls ! Why hast thou placed such infinite degrees

an infinitely small error, and agree precisely Between the cause and cure of my disease? Prior. with those that are deduced by the method of

Infinitely the greater part of mankind have pro- fluxions. See Fluxions. fessed to act under a full persuasion of this great INFIRM', adj. & v. a. Fr. infirme ; Latin article.

Rogers. INFIRM AKY, N. S. infirmus. Weak; feeLife is the triumph of our mouldering clay ; INFIRM'ITY, n. s. ble; disabled in body; Death of the spirit infinite! divine !

INFIRM'NESS, n. S.

weak of mind; not Then sweet to muse upon his skill displayed stable or solid : to weaken or enfeeble. Infir(Infinite skill) in all that he has made !

mary, a house for the reception of the sick. InCowper. Retirement.

firmity, weakness of sex, age, or temper; failing; Can it fall out? Infinity with immortality? Byron. Cain.

fault; disease or malady. Infirmness, weakness. And here I cannot forbear reflecting on the infinite

There is a leche in Room that hath ymade a cry improvements made by moderns in the method of To make an oyntment to cure all tho ben blynde, elucidating and confirming all matters of opinion.

And al maner infirmytees that groweth in man

Canning. Microcosm. kynde. Chaucer. The Merchantes Second Tale. INFINITE signifies that which has neither be- A friend should bear a friend's infirmities; ginning nor end; in which sense God alone is But Brutus makes mine greater than they are. infinite. Infinite is likewise applied to that

Shakspeare. which has had a beginning, but will have no end,

Infirmity, as angels and human souls. This makes what which waits upon worn times, hath something

seized the schoolmen call infinitum a parte post. His wished ability.

Id. Winter's Tale. INFINITE QUANTITIES. The very idea of I am afraid to think what I have done : magnitudes infinitely great, or such as exceed

Look on't again, I dare not. any assignable quantities, does include a negation - Infirm of purpose ; of limits; yet if we nearly examine this notion, Give me the dagger.

Id. Macbeth. we shall find that such magnitudes are not equal

Here stand I your among themselves, but that there are really, be- A poor, infirm, weak, and despised old man. sides infinite length and infinite area, three

Shakspeare. several sorts of infinite solidity; all of which Some contrary spirits will object this as a suffiare quantitates sui generis, and that those of each cient reason to infirm all those points. Raleigh. species are in given proportions. Infinite length, These buildings to be for privy lodgings on both or a line infinitely long, is to be considered - sides, and the end for privy galleries, whereof one either as beginning at a point, and so infinitely should be for an infirmary, if any special person

should be sick.

Bacon. extended one way, or else both ways, from the same point; in which case the one, which is a

This spleen is unjustly introduced to invigorate beginning infinity, is the one-half of the whole, the sinister side, which, being dilated, would rather

Browne's Vulgar Errours. which is the sum of the beginning and ceasing infirm and debilitate it.

Many infirmities made it appear more requisite, that infinity; or, as may be said, of infinity a parte a wiser man should have the application of his in-. ante, and a parte post, which is analogous to

Clarendon. Eternity in time and duration, in which there is

That on my head all might be visited, always as much to follow as is past, from any Thy frailty, and infirmer sex, forgiven; point or moment of time; nor does the addition To me committed, and by me exposed. or subduction of finite length, or space of time,

Milton. alter the case either in infinity or eternity, since Some experiments may discover the infirmness and both the one and the other cannot be any part of insufficiency of the peripatetick doctrine. Boyle. the whole.

Sometimes the races of man may be depraved by INFINITESIMALS, 1. s. Among mathematithe infirmities of birth.

Temple. cians, are defined to be infinitely small quantities. Such are the last infirmities of those In the method of infinitesimals, the element by Who long have suffered more than mortal woe. which any quantity increases or decreases, is

Byron. Prophecy of Dante. supposed to be infinitely small; and is generally

INFIX', v. a. Lat. infirus. To drive in; to expressed by two or more terms, some of which set; to fasten.

brave;

terest.

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