An Historical View of the Philippine Islands: Exhibiting Their Discovery, Population, Language, Government, Manners, Customs, Productions and Commerce, 1권

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Black, Parry, and Company, 1814
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27 페이지 - No doubt can be entertained," says M. de Zuniga, " that the radical language, from which all these (Polynesian) dialects spring, prevails from Madagascar to the Philippines, with local shades of difference. It is spoken, too, in New Guinea, and in all the islands to the southward, in the Marianas, in the islands of San Duisk...
33 페이지 - Duisk and Otaheite, which are distant two thousand leagues from the Philippines. All these people, however, have the same language, the same manners and customs, and consequently the same origin as our Indians. There is, in my opinion, this other reason for supposing these latter islands could not be peopled from the westward, viz. that in all the torrid zone the east wind generally prevails, which, being in direct opposition to the course from Malacca and the adjacent islands, it is fair to conclude...
31 페이지 - A great many other words are either actually of Tagalic derivation, or assimilate closely to that language. In examining the structure of these two languages we are compelled to conclude that they flow from one and the same source, and I dare affirm that the Indians of the Philippines are descended from the aborigines of Chili and Peru, and that the language of these islands derives immediately from the parent source, those of the neighbouring islands being dialects of this.
25 페이지 - The Indians whom the Spaniards found here, were of regular stature, and of an olive complexion, with flat noses, large eyes, and long hair. They all possessed some description of government better or worse, and each nation was distinguished by a different name ; but, the similarity of their dress and manners, proves that the origin of all of them is the same.
4 페이지 - Zuniga," the following passage occurs : — "There are in this island several volcanoes as that of Mayon, which is between the provinces of Albay and Camarines. It has a sugar-loaf figure, and is of such altitude that it may be discovered at an immense distance at sea. The de Taal is of a similar form and stands in the middle of a large lake called de Bombon ; it exhibits sufficient proof that the mountain in whose top the volcano was, has sunk, remaining, however, still pretty much elevated above...
30 페이지 - On observing that the proper names of places, about the middle of the continent of South America, are very similar to those of the Philippines, I endeavoured to procure a vocabulary of this country, and did not fail to examine with great diligence and attention the few words of the language of Chili which Ercilla mentions in his Araucana, and which I found perfectly conformable to the language of Tagala. The name Chili is a derivation from this language : the cormorant is called coddle, aud this...
32 페이지 - ... that language. In examining the structure of these two languages, we are compelled to conclude that they flow from one and the same source ; and I dare affirm that the Indians in the Philippines are descended from the aborigines of Chili and Peru, and that the language of these islands derives itself immediately from the parent source, those of the neighbouring islands being dialects of this. Many will urge the absurdity of this...
248 페이지 - Docos, marched in good order seven days, and on the eighth day arrived in the town of the mines, where the natives received them well; but the Spaniards placed too much confidence in them. The Igorotes, when least expected, rose on them, and treacherously murdered the chief of the friendly Indians, on which de Valdes retired, to wait a better opportunity. (Maver's translation, I...
31 페이지 - In examining the structure of these two languages," observes that writer, '' we are compelled to conclude that they flow from one and the same source." The words which De Zuniga quotes from the Chilian dialect, viz.. " ytayta, biobio, lemolemo, colocolo," are decidedly Polynesian in their aspect, whatever may be their signification. Let the reader compare them with such Polynesian words as " udiudi, korakora, nohinohi, rekereke...
27 페이지 - It is not, however, after all, easy to ascertain the origin of these people, but their idiom throws some degree of light on the subject. Although the languages these Indians speak, are many and different, they have so much intercourse one with another, that it may clearly be discovered, they are 'dialects of the same language, as the Spanish, 'French, and Italian, are derivatives from the Latin. The prepositions and...

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