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Gladness grew in me upon the bitants. Are not these, O Mirzah, discovery of so delightful a scene. I • habitations worth contending for? wished for the wings of an eagle, that I • Does life appear miserable, that gives might fiy away to those happy seats; but the opportunities of earning such a the genius told me there was no passage reward? Is death to be feared, that to them, except through the gates of will convey thee to so happy an exiftdeath that I saw opening every moment i ence? Think not man was made in upon the bridge. The islands,' said ( vain, who has such an eternity rehe, ' that lie to freth and green before • served for him.' I gazed with inex. • thee, and with which the whole face pretlible pleasure on these happy islands. • of the ocean appears spotted as far as At lengih, said Im Shew me now, I ( thou canst see, are more in number « beseech thee, the secrets that lie hid ! than the lands of the sea-shore; there I under those dark clouds which cover

are myriads of islands behind those • the ocean on the other side of the rock • which ihou frere discoverest, reaching of adamant.' The genius making • farther than even thine eye, or even me no answer, I turned about to address « thy imagination, can extend itself. myself to him a second time, but I « These are the niansions of good men found that he had left me; I then turned (after death, who according to the de- again to the vision which I had been so

gree and kinds of virtue in which they Jong contemplating; but instead of the • excelled, are distributed among thelė rolling tide, the arched bridge, and the • several inlunds, which abound with happy iflands, I saw nothing but the long * pleasures of different kinds and de. hollow vailey of Bagdat, with oxen, grues,

suitable to the relishes and per- theep, and camels, grazing upon the fections of those who are lected in fides of it. them; ever y land is a paradise accommodated to it's respective inha The end of the first vision of Mirzah,

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N° CLX. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3.

CUI MINS DIVINIOR, ATQUE OS
MAGNA SONA TURUM, DES NOMINIS HUJUS HONOREM.

HOR. SAT. IV. L. 1. V.43.
HE ALONE CAN CLAIM THIS NAME, WHO WRITES
WITH TANCY HIGH, AND BOLD AND DARING FLIGHTS.

CREECK.
*HERE is no character more fre. and the wonder of pofterity. There ap-

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of being a genius, I have heard many vagant in these great natural geniuses, a little fonneteer called a fine genius. that is infinitely more beautiful than all, There is not an heroic scribbler in the the turn and polishing, of what the nation that has not his adinirers who French call a Bel Elprit, by which they think him a great enius; and as for would exprefs a genius refined by conyour fnatterers in tragedy, there is verfation, reflection, and the reading of scarce a man among them who is not the most polite authors. The greatest cried up by one or other for a prodigious' genius which runs through the arts and genius.

fciences, takes a kind of tincture from My design in this paper is to consider them, and falls unavoidably into imi. what is properly a great genius, and to tation. throw some thoughts together on so un.' Many of these great natural geniuses common a subject.

that were never disciplined and broken Among great geniuses those few draw by rules of art, are to be found among the admiration of all the world upon the ancients, and in particular among them, and land up as the prodigies of those of the more eastern parts of the mankind, who by the mere itrength of world. Homer has innumerable flights natural parts, and w thout any affiítance that Virgit was not able to reach, and of art or learning, have produced works in the Old Testament we find several that were the delight of their own times,, paffagez more elevated and sublinze than

any

any in Homer. At the same time that as Horace has represented them, are we allow a greater and more daring ge singular in their kind, and inimitable; nius to the ancients, we must own that when I see men following irregularities the greareit of them very much failed in, by rule, and by the little tricks of art or, if you will, that they were much training after the most unbounded lights above the nicety and correctness of the of nature, I cannot but apply to them moderns. In their fimilitudes and al., that paffage in Terence: lufions, provided there was a likeness, they did not much trouble themselves.

- Incerta ber si tu poRules

Ratione certa facere, nibilo plus ages, about the decency of the comparison: thus Solomon resembles the note of his Quam fi des operam, ut cum ratione in unias.

EUN. ACT.1. Sc.I. beloved to the tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus; as the com

You may as well pretend to be mad and in

your senses at the saine time, as to think ing of a thief in the night is a fimilitude

of reducing these uncertain things to any of the fame kind in the New Testament.

certainty by reason. It would be endless to make collections of this nature; Homer illustrates one of In short, a modern pindaric writer, bis heroes encompassed with the enemy, compared with Pindar, is like a filter, by an ass in a field of corn, that has his among the Camisars compared with Virfides belaboured by all the boys of the gil's Sibyl: there is the diltortion, grivillage without ftirring a foot for it: mace, and outward figure, but nothing and another of them tosling to and fro of that divine impulfe which raises the in his bed and burning with resentment, mind above isfelt, and makes the founds to a piece of Aesh broiled on the coals. more than human. This particular failure in the ancients, There is another kind of great geopens a large field of raillery to the little niufes which I thall place in a second wits, who can laugh at an indecency class, not as I think thein inferior to but not relish the fublime in there forts the firit, but only for difiin&tion's fake, of writings. The present Emperor of as they are of a different kind. This Persia, conformable to this eastern way second class of great geniuses are those of thinking, amidst a great many pom

that have formed then:felves by rules, pous titles, denominates himself the Sun and submitted the greatness of their naof Glory and the Nutmeg of Delight. tural taleats to the corrections and reIn short, to cut off all cavilling against straints of art. Such among the Greeks the ancients, and particularly those of were Plaro and Aristotle; among the the warmer climates, who had mort Romans, Virgil and Tully; among the heat and life in their imaginations, we

English, Milton and Sir Francis Bacon. are to consider that the rule of ob The genius in both these classes of ferving what the French call the Bien- authors may be equally great, but shews seance in an allufion, has been found itself after a different manner. In the out of later years, and in the colder re firft it is like a rich foil in a happy clio gions of the world, where we would mate, that produces a whole wilderness make some amends for our want of of noble plants ring in a thouíaud force and spirit, by a scrupulous nicery beautiful landskips, without any certain and exactness in our compositions. Our order or regularity. In the other it is countryman Shakespeare was a remark the same rich fuil under the fame happy able inftance of this first kind of great climate; that has been laid out in walks geniuses.

and parterres, and cut into thape aad I cannot quit this head without ob- beauty by the ikill of the gardener. serving that Pindar was a great genius The great danger in thele latter kind of the first class, who was hurried on by of geniuses, is, left they crump their a natural fire and impetuosity to tait own abilities too much by imitation, and conceptions of things and noble sallies form themselves altogether upon models, of imagination. · At the same time, can without giving the full play to their own any thing be more ridiculous than for natural parts. Animitation of the best men of a sober and moderate fancy to authors is not to compare with a good imitate this poet's way of writing in original; and I believe we may olderve those monstrous compositions which go that very few writers make an exiraoramong tis under the name of Pindaries? dinary figure in the world, who have When I ke people copying works, which, not something in their way of thinking

OL

or expressing themfelves that is peculiar . ing in the air, and falling into his hand to them, and intirely their own.

by turns. I think,' lays the author, It is odd to consider what great ge ' I never saw a greater severity than in niuses are sometimes thrown away upon this man's face; for by his wonderful trifles.

perseverance and application, he had I once saw a Mepheril,' says a fa · contracted the seriousness and gravity mous Italian author, who used to di • of a privy-counsellor; and I could not • vert himself in his folitudes with tolling . but reflect with myself, that the same

up eggs and catching them again with ' afliduity and attention, had they been • out breaking them: in which he had rightly applied, might have made him « arrived to so great a degree of perfec a greater mathematician than Archi• tion, that he would keep up four at a

6 medes.' time for several minutes together play

N° CLXI. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4.

IPSE DIES AGITAT FESTOS : FUSUS QUE PER HERBAM,
IGNIS UBI IN MEDIO ET SOCII CRATERA CORONANT,
TE LIBANS, LENÆE, VOCAT: PECORISQUE MAGISTRIS
VELOCIS JACULI CERTAMINA PONIT IN ULMO,
CORPORA QUE AGRESTI NUDAT PRÆDURA PALÆSTRA.
HANC OLIM VETEKES VITAM COLUERE SABINI,
HANC REMUS ET ERATER": SIC FORTIS ETRURIA CREVIT,
SCILICET ET RERUM FACTA EST PULCHERRIMA ROMA.,

VIRG. GEORG. II. 1.523.
HIMSELF, IN RUSTIC POMP, ON HOLIDAYS,
TO RURAL POW'RS A JUST OBLATION PAYS;
AND ON THE GREEN HIS CARELESS LIMBS DISPLAYS. *
THE HEARTH IS IN THE MIDST; THE HER DSMEN, ROUND
THE CHEAR FUL FIRE, PROVOKE HIS HEALTH IN GOBLETS CROWx'D,
HE CALLS ON BACCHUS, AND PROPOUNDS THE PRIZE;
THE GROOM HIS FELLOW-GROOM AT BUTS DEFIES,
AND SENDS HIS BOW, AND LEVELS WITH HIS EYES:
OR, STRIPT FOR WRESTLING, SMEARS HIS LIMBŚ WITH OIL,
AND WATCHES WITH A TRIP HIS FOL TO FOIL.
SUCH WAS THE LIFE THE FRUGAL SABINES LED;
SO REMUS AND HIS BROTHER GOD WERE BRED:
FROM WHOM TH' AUSTERL ETRURIAN VIRTUE ROSES
AND THIS RUDL LIFE OUR HOMELY TATHERS CHOSE :
OLD ROME FROM SUCH A RACE DERIV'D HER BIRTH,
THE SEAT OF EMPIRE, AND THE CONQUER'D EARTH.

Dryden,

។ I

country has increased the number of of our churches. I was last week at one my correspondents, one of whom iends of these assemblies which was held in a me the following letter.

neighbouring parish; where I found their

green covered with a promiscuous mul-SIX,

titude of all ages and both sexes, who THOUGH you are pleased to retire esteem one another more or less. the fol

from us so soon into the city, 1 hope lowing part of the year according as you will not think the affairs of the coun they distinguish themselves at this time, try altogether unworthy of your inspec- The whole company were in their holi, tion for the future. I had the honour day clothes, and divided into several parof seeing your short face at Sir Roger de ties, all of them endeavouring to thew Coverley's, and have ever fince thought themselves in those exercises wherein they your person and writings both extraor-, excelled, and to gain the approbation of dinary. Had you staid there « few days the lookers-on. longer, you would have feen a country I found a ring of cudgel.players, whą wake, which you know in molt parts of were breaking one another's heads in'

order

1

order to make some impression on their such an air of importance in his looks,
miltreffes hearts. I obferved a lutty that I could not help inquiring who he
young fellow, who had the misfortune was, and was immediately answered,
of a broken pate; but what considerably That he did not value himself nipon no-
added to the anguish of the wound, was thing, for that lie and his ancestors had
his over-hearing an old man, who thook won so many hats, that his parlour look-
his head and said, that he questioned now ed like a haberdasher's shop: however
if Black Kate would marry him these this thirst of glory of them all, was the
three years. I was diverted from a far reason that no one man stood lord of the
ther obfervation of these combatants, by ring for above three falls while I was
a foot-ball match, which was on the among them.
other side of the green; where Tom Short The young maids, who were not
behaved himself so well, that most peo lookers-on at these exercises, were them-
ple seemed to agree it was impossible that felves engaged in some diversions; and
he should remain a bachelor until the upon my alking a farmer's ton of my
Dext wake. Having played many a own parish what he was gazing at with
match myself, I could have looked so much attention, he told me, that he
lenger on this sport, had I not observed was seeing Betty Welch, who I knew
a country girl, who was posted on an to be his sweetheart, pitch a bar.
eminence at some distance from me, and In short, I found the men endeavour-
was making so many odd grimaces and ed to shew the women they were no
writhing and diftorting her whole body cowards, and that the whole company
in so strange a manner, as made me very ftrived to recommend themselves to each
desirous to know the meaning of it. other, by making it appear that they
Upon my coming up to her, I found that were all in a perfect state of health, and
he was overlooking a ring of wrest.' fit to undergo any fatigues of bodily la-
lers, and that her sweetheart, a person. bour.
of small ftature, was contending with an Your judgment upon this method of
huge brawny fellow, who twirled him love and gallantry, as it is at pretent
about, and shook the little man fo vio- pra&tised amongst us in the country,
lently, that by a fecret fympathy of hearts will very much oblige, Sir,
it produced all those agitations in the

Your's &c.
person of his mittress, who, I dare say,
like Cælia in Shakespeare on the same oc If I would here put on the scholar
cafion, could have wished herself invisible and polititian, I inight inform my read-
to catch the strong fellow by the leg. ers how these bodily exercises or games
The 'Squire of the parish treats the whole were formerly encouraged in all the com-
company every year with a hogshead of monwealths of Greece: from whence
ale; and proposes a beaver hat as a re- the Romans afterwards borrowed their
compence to him who gives molt falls. Pentathlum, which was composed of
This has raised such a spirit of emulation running, wreitling, leaping, throwing,
in the youth of the place, that some of and boxing, though the prizes were ge:
them have rendered themselves very ex- nerally nothing but a crown of cypress
pert at this exercise, and I was often or parsley, hats not being in fashion in
furprised to see a fellow's heels fly up, those days: that there is an old itatute,
by a trip which was given him fo smartly which obliges every man in England,
that I could scarce discern it. I found having such an estate, to keep and exer-
that the old wreftlers seldom entered the cise the long bow; by which means our
ring, until fome one was grown formi. ancestors excelled all other nations in
dable by having thrown two or three of the use of that weapon, and we had all
his opponents; but kept themselves as it the real advantages, without the incon-
were in a reserved body to defend the venience of a standing ai my; and that
hat, which is always hung up by the I once met with a book of projects, in,
person who gets it in one of the most which the author contidering to what
conspicuous parts of the house, and look. noble ends that spirit of emulation, which
od upon by the whole family as fome so remarkably thews itself among our
thing redounding much more to their common people in these wakes, might be
honour than a coat of arms. There was directed, proposes that for the improve-
a fellow who was so busy in regulating ment of all our handicraft trades there
all the ceremonies, and seemed to carry should be annual prizes set up for such

perions

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persons as were most excellent in their I am the more pleased with having feveral arts. But laying aside all these love made the principal end and design political considerations, which might of these meetings, as it seems to be molt tempt me to pass the limits of my paper, agreeable to the intent for which they I confess the greatest benefit and conve were at first instituted, as we are informnience that I can observe in these coun ed by the learned Dr. Kennet, with ty feftivals, is the bringing young peo

whole words I shall conclude my present ple together, and giving them an oppor. paper. tunity of sewing themselves in the inolt . These wakes' says he, 'were in advantageous light. A country fellow • imitation of the ancient dyárai, or that throws his rival upon his back, has I love feasts; and were first established generally as good success with their com in England by Pope Gregory the mon miltrels; as nothing is more usual • Great, who in an epistle to Męlitus than for a nimble-footed wench to get • the Abbot gave order that they should a husband at the same time the wins a be kept in theds or arbories made up smock. Love and marriages are the

' with branches and boughs of trees natural effects of these anniversary af

round the church.' femblies. I must therefore very much He adds. That this laudable cul. approve the method by which my cor • tom of wakes prevailed for many ages, respondent tells me each sex endeavours • until the nice puritans. began to ex. to recommend itself to the other, since • claim againg it as a remnant of ponothing seems more likely to promise a регу; and by degrees the precise hu. healthy offspring or a happy cohabita mour grew so popular, that at an tion. And I believe I may affure my • Exeter aslizes the Lord Chief Baron country friend, that there has been inany " Walter made an order for the supa court lady who would be contented to pression of all wakes; but on Bishop exchange her ciazy young husband for • Laud's complaining of this innovata Tom Short, and several men of quality ing humour, the king commanded the who would have parted with a tender order to be reversed.' yoke-fellow for Black Kate.

No CLXII. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5.

- SERVETUR AD IMUM,
QUALIS AB INCEPTO PROCESSERIT, IT SIBI CONSTIT.

HOR. ARS POET. V. 126.

PRESERVE CONSISTENCY THROUGHOUT THE WHOLL.

NO
NOTHING that is not a real able motives; or whatever approbations
crime makes a man appear fo con-

they may receive from themselves, and temptible and little in the eyes of the applauses from those they conver fe with, world as inconitancy, especially when they may be very well assured that they it regards religion or party. In either are the scorn of all good men, and the of these cases, though a man perhaps public marks of infamy and derifion. does but his duty in changing his tide, Irresolution on the schemes of life he not only makes himself hated by those which offer themselves to our choice, he left, but is feldom heartily esteeined and inconstancy in pursuing them, are by thote he comes over to.

the greatest and most universal causes of In these great articles of life, there- all our disquiet and unhappiness. When fore, a man's conviction ought to be ambition pulls one way, interest another, very strong, and if possible so well timed inclination a third, and perhaps reason that worldly advantages may seein to contrary to all, a man is likely to pass have no share in it, or mankind will be his time but ill who has so many difill-natured enough to think he does not ferent parties to please. Wiren the mird change sides out of principle, but either hovers among such a variety of allureout of levity of temper or prospects of nents, one had better settle on a way of interest. Converts and renegadoes of life that is not the very beft we might all kinds should take particular care to have chofer, than grow old without delet the world see they act upon honour- termining our choice, and go out of the

world,

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