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NO CLXVII. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11,

FUIT HAUD IGNOBILIS ARGIS,
QUI SE CREDEBAT MIROS AUDIRE TRAGOEDOS,
IN VACUO LETUS SESSOR PLAUSORQUE THEATRO;
CETERA QUI VITÆ SERVAR ET MUNIA RECTO
MORE; BONUS SANE VICINUS, AMABILIS HOSPES,
COMIS IN UXOREM; POSSIT QUI IGNOSCERE SERVIS,
ET SIGNO LÆSO NON INSANIRE LAGEN #:
POSSET QUI RUPEM ET PUTEUM VITARE PATENTEM,
HIC UBI COGNATORUM OPIBUS CURISQUE REFECTUS
IXPULIT ELLEBORO MOREUM BILEMQUE MERACO,
ET REDIT AD SESE; POL ME OCCIDISTIS, AMICI,
NON SERVASTIS, AIT; CUI SIC EXTORTA VOLUPTAS,
KT DEMPTUS PER VIM MENTIS GRATISSIMUS ERROR.

Hor. Ep. II. L. II. V. 13%.

IMITATE D.

THERE LIV'D IN PRIMO GEORGII, THEY RECORD,
A WORTHY MEMBER, NO SMALL FOOL, A LORD;
WHO, THOUGH THE HOUSE WAS UP, DELIGHTED SATE,
REARD, NOTEN, ANSWER’D, AS IN FULL DEBATE;
IN ALL BUT THIS, A MAN OF SOBER LIFE,
FOND OF HIS FRIEND, AND CIVIL TO HIS WIFE;
NOT QUITE A MADMAN, THOUGH A PASTY FELL,
AND MUCH TOO WISE TO WALK INTO A WELL.
HIM THE DAMN'D DOCTOR AND HIS FRIENDS IMMUR'D;.
THEY BLED, THEY CUPP'D, THEY PURG'D, IN SHORT THEY CUR'D;
WHERE AT THE GENTLEMAN BEGAN TO STARI
• MY FRIENDS?' HE CRY'D: 'POX TAKE YE FOR YOUR CARE!

THAT FROM A PATRIOT OF DISTINGUISH'D NOTE,
HAVE ELED AND PURG'D ME TO A SIMPLE VOTE.'

Popi.

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HE unhappy force of an imagina- who lets his fancy place him in distant resion and judgment, was the subject of very much preferable to that of him a former speculation. My reader may who is ever forcing a belief, and defende remember that he has seen in one of mying his untruths with new inventions. papers a complaint of an unfortunate But I fall halten to let this liar in folia gen:leman, who was unable to contain loquy, who calls himself a Castle. Limself, when any ordinary matter was

Builder, describe himself with the same laid before him, from adding a few cir- unreservedness as formerly appeared in Elmstances to enliven plain narrative. my correspondent above-mentioned. If That correspondent was a person of too a nan were to be serious on this subject, warm a complexion to be satisfied with he might give very grave admonitions things merely as they stood in nature, to those who are following any thing in and therefore formed incidents which this life, on which they think to place Mould have happened to have pleased their hearts, and tell them that they are hm in the story. The same ungoverned really Castle-Builders. Fame, glory, fancy which pushed that correspondent wealth, honour, have in the prospect in, in spite of himself, to relate public pleasing illusions; but they who come and notorious falfhoods, makes the au to possels any of them will find they thor of the following letter do the same are ingredients towards happiness, to be m private; one is a prating, the other regarded only in the second place; and a filent liar.

that when they are valued in the first There is little pursued in the errors of degree, they are as disappointing as either of these worthies, but mere pre- any of the phantoms in the following 1ent amusement: but the folly of bim letter.

2 S2

MR.

MR. SPECTATOR, SEPT. 6, 1711. air and mien. These are the gay phan. I Am a fellow of a very odd frame of toms that dance before my waking

mind, as you will find by the sequel; eyes, and compose my day-dreams. I and think myself fool enough to deserve should be the moft contented, happy a place in your paper. I am unhappily man alive, were the chimerical happiness far gone in building, and am one of which springs from the paintings of that species of men who are properly de- fancy leis fleeting and tranfitory. But nominated Castle-builders, who scorn alas! it is with grief of mind I tell you, to be beholden to the earth for a foun- the least breath of wind has often dedation, or dig in the bowels of it for molished my.magnificent edifices, swept materials; but erect their structures in away my groves, and left no more trace the most unstable of elements, the air, of them than if they had never been. fancy alone laying the line, marking My exchequer has funk, and vanished the extent, and shaping the model. It by a rap on my door, the falutation of would be difficult to enumerate what a friend has coft me a whole continent, august palaces and stately porticos have and in the same moment I have been grown under my forming imagination, pulled by the sleeve, my crown has fallen or what verdant meadows and shady from my head. The ill consequence of groves have started into being by the these reveries is inconceivably great, powerful feat of a warm fancy. A seeing the loss of imaginary poffeffions Castle-builder is even just what he makes impressions of real woe. Besides, pleases, and as such I have grasped bad economy is visible and apparent in imaginary sceptres, and delivered un builders of invisible mansions. My controulable edicts, from a throne to tenants advertisements of ruins and diwhich conquered nations yielded obei- lapidations often caft a damp on my fance. I have made I know not how fpirits, even in the instant when the fun, many inroads into France, and ravaged in all it's splendor, gilds my eastern the very heart of that kingdom; I have palaces. Add to this the penfive drud. dined in the Louvre, and drank cham- gery in building, and conttant gralp. pagne at Versailles; and I would have ing aerial trowels, distracts and shatters you take notice, I am not only able to the mind, and the fond builder of Ba. vanquish a people already cowed and bels is often cursed with an incoherent accustomed to flight, but I could, Al. diverfity and confusion of thoughts. I monzor-like, drive the British general do not know-to whom I can more profrom the field, were I less a protestant, perly apply myself for relief from this or had ever been affronted by the con- fantastical evil, than to yourself; whom federates. There is no art or profet; I earnestly implore to accommodate me sion, whose moft celebrated matters I with a method how to settle my head have not eclipsed. Wherever I have and cool my brain-pan. A dissertation afforded my falutary presence, fevers on Castle-building may not only be ser. have ceased to burn, and agues to shake viceable no myself, but all architects, the human fabric. When an eloquent who display their skill in the thin ele. fit has been upon me, an apt gesture ment. Such a favour would oblige me and proper cadence has animated each to make my next soliloquy not contain Sentence, and gazing crowds have found the praifes of my dear self, but of the their passions worked up irta rage, or Spectator, who shall, by complying foothed into a calm. i am short, and with this, make me his obliged, humnbk not very well made; yet upon sight of a fervant, fine woman, I bave stretched into a

VITRUVIUS. proper ftature, and killed with a good T

No CLXVIII

N° CLXVIII. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12.

PICTUS PRÆCEPTIS FORMAT AMICIS.

Hor. Ep. I. 1.2. 7. 128

TORMS THE SOFT BOSOM WITH THE GENTLEST ART.

POPE.

me.

Send you

T would be arrogance to negled the And yet I may say without vanity,

application of my correspondents so that the business of the school was what far, as not sometimes to insert their ani. I did without great difficulty; and I was madversions upon my paper; that of not remarkably unlucky; and yet such this day fall be therefore wholly coma was the master's feverity, that once a posed of the hints which they have sent month, or oftener, I suffered as much as

would have fatisfied the law of the land

for a petty larceny. MR. SPECTATOR,

Many a white and tender hand, which I

this to congratulate your the fond mother had passionately kissed late choice of a subject, for treating a thousand and a thousand times, have I on which you deserve public thanks; I seen whipped until it was covered with mean that on those licensed tyrants the blood : perhaps for smiling, or for going fchool-masters. If you can disarm them a yard and half out of a gate, or for of their rods, you will certainly have writing an O for an A, or an A for an your old age reverenced by all the young 0; these were our great faults! Many a gentlemen of Great Britain who are now brave and noble spirit has been there between seven and seventeen years. You broken; others have run from thence, may boast that the incomparably wise and were never heard of afterwards. It Quintilian and you are of one mind in is a worthy attempt to undertake the this particular. Si cui eft, says he, cause of distressed youth; and it is a • mens tam illiberalis ut objurgatione noble piece of knight-errantry to enter

non corrigatur, is etiam ad plagas, ut the lists against so many armed pedapelima quæque mancipia durabitur.' gogues. It is pity but we had a set of i. e. ' If any child be of lo disingenuous men, polite in their behaviour and me• a nature, as not to stand corrected by thod of teaching, who should be put • reproof, he, like the very worst of into a condition of being above fatter• llaves, will be hardened even against ing or fearing the parents of those they

blows themselves.' And afterwards, instruct. We might then possibly see Pudet dicere in que probra nefandi learning become a pleasure, and children, bomines ifto cædendi jure abutantur.' delighting themselves in that which now i. e. 'I blush to say how shamefully they abhor for coming upon fuch hard " those wicked men abuse the

power

of

terms to them : what would be still a • correction.'

greater happiness arising from the care I was bred myself, Sir, in a very great of such instructors, would be, that we school, of which the master was a Welsh- should have no more pedants, nor any man, but certainly descended from a

bred to learning who had not genius for Spanish family, as plainly appeared from it. I am, with the utmost sincerity, his temper as well as his name. I leave Sir, your most affectionate humble seryou to judge what a sort of a school- vant. master a Welshman ingrafted on a Spaniard would make. So very dreadful

RICHMOND, SEPT. Sth, 1771. had he made himself to me, that although it is above twenty years since I felt his MR. SPECTATOR, heavy hand, yet fill once a month at I Am a boy of fourteen years of age, least I dream of him, so strong an im and have for this last year been unpression did he make on my mind. It der the tuition of a doctor of divinity, is a sign he has fully terrified me wak. who has taken the school of this place ing, who still continues to haunt me under his care. From the gentleman's Beeping.

great tenderness to me and friendship to

my

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my father, I am very happy in learning loudest, when the set happens to be made
my book with pleasure. We never leave up of three or four females who have
off our diversions any farther than to got what you call a woman's man among
salute him at hours of play when he them.
pleases to look on. It is impossible for I am at a loss to know from whom
any of us to love our own parents better people of fortune should learn this be.
than we do him. Ile never gives any haviour, unless it be from the footmen
of us an harsh word; and we think it who keep their places at a new play,
the greatest punishment in the world and are often feen palling away their
when he will not speak to any of us. time in sets at all-fours in the face of 1
My brother and I are both together in- full house, and with a perfect difregard
diting this letter: he is a year older than to the people of quality fitting on each
I am, but is now ready to break his fide of them.
heart that the doctor has not taken any For preserving, therefore, the decency
notice of him these three days. If you of public assemblies, methinks it would
please to print this he will see it, and, be but reasonable that those who disturb
we hope, taking it for my brother's others should pay at leatt a double price
earnest desire to be restored to his fa. for their places; or rather women of
vour, he will again fmile upon him. birth and distinction should be informed,
Your inost obedient servant, that a levity of behaviour in the eyes of

T. S. people of underitanding degrades them

below their meanest attendants; and MR. SPECTATOR,

gentlemen Mould know that a fine coat You have represented fereral forts is a livery, when the perfon who wears of impertinents fingly, I wish you

it discovers no higher sense than that of would now proceed, and describe lonie

a footman. I am, Sir, your moft hum

ble servant. of them in fets. It often happens in public assemblics, that a party who came thither together, or whole impertinencies BEDFORDSHIRE, SEPT. 1, 1711. are of an equal pitch, ait in conc:it,

MR. SPECTATOR, and are so full of themselves as to give disturbance to all that are aivout them. I Am one of those whom every body Soinetimes you have a rit of whisperers calls a poacher, and sometimes go who lay their heads together in order to

out to course with a brace of grey hounds, facrifice every body within their obtére a maftiff, and a spaniel or two; and vation; sometimes a set of laughs, that when I am weuy with courling, and keep up an infipid mirth in their own

have killed hares enough, go to an alecorner, and by their nose and gefuies house to refresh myself. I beg the faMhew they have no refpe for the reit of vour of you, as you set up for a rethe company. You frequently weet

former, to send us word how many dogs with these leis at the opera, the play, you will allow us to go with, how many the water-works, and other public meit

full-pots of ale to drink, and how many ings, where their whole buliness is 10 hares to kill in a day, and you will do draw off the attention of the spectators a great piece of service to all the sporti. from the entertainment, and to fix it men: be quick then, for the time of upon themselves; and it is to be ob- courfing is come on.

Yours in hafte, served that the impertinence is ever T

ISAAC HEDGEDITCH.

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N° CLXIX. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13.

SIC VITA ERAT: FACILE OMNES PER FERRE AC PATI:
CUM QUIBUS ERAT CUNQUE UNA, HIS SESE DE DERE,
EORUM OBSEQUI STUDIIS : ADVERSUS NEMINI;
NUNC'UAM PRÆPONENS SE ALIIS: ITA FACILLIME
SINE INVIDIA INVENIAS LAUDEM.

TER. ANDR. Act. 1. Sc. I. HIC MANNER OF LIFE WAS THIS: TO BEAR WITH EVERY BODY'S HUMOURS ;

TO COMPLY WITH THE INCLINATIONS AND PURSUITS OF THOSE HE CONVERSED WITH; TO CONTRADICT NOBODY; NEVER TO ASSUME A SUPERIORITY OVER OTHERS. THIS IS THE READY WAY TO GAIN APPLAUSE, WITHOUT EXCITING ENVY.

MA

AN is subject to innumerable good-nature, or in other terms, affa

pains and sorrows by the very bility, complaisance, and easiness of condition of humanity; and yet, as if temper, reduced into an art. nature had not sown evils enough in These exterior shows and appearances life, we are continually adding grief to of humanity render a man wonderfully grief, and aggravating the common ca popular and beloved when they are lamity by our cruel treatment of one founded upon a real good-nature ; but another. Every man's natural weight without it are like hypocrisy in religion, of afflictions is still made more heavy or a bare form of holiness, which, when by the envy, malice, treachery, or in- it is discovered, makes a man more dejustice of his neiglıbour. At the same teftable than professed impiety. time that the storm beats upon the whole Good-nature is generally born with species, we are falling foul upon one us; health, prosperity, and kind treatanother.

ment from the world, are great cherishHalf the misery of human life mighters of it where they find it; but nothing be extinguished, would men alleviate the is capable of forcing it up, where it does general curse they lie under, by mutual not grow of itself. It is one of the offices of compassion, benevolence, and bleflings of a happy conftitution, which humanity. There is nothing therefore education may improve but not produce. which we ought more to encourage in Xenophon, in the life of his imaginary ourselves and others, than that diipoli- prince, whom he describes as a pattern tion of mind which in our language for real ones, is always celebrating the goes under the title of Good-nature, philanthropy or good-nature of his hero, and which I shall chuse for the subject which he tells us he brought into the of this day's speculation.

world with him, and gives many reGood-nature is more agreeable in markable instances of it in his childconversation than wit, and gives a cer hood, as well as in all the several parts tain air to the countenance which is of his life. Nay, on his death-bed, he more amiable than beauty. It shews describes him as being pleased, that virtue in the faireit light, takes off in while his soul returned to him who had some measure from the deformity of vice, made it, his body 'should incorporate and makes even folly and impertinence with the great mother of all things, and fupportable.

by that means become beneficial to manThere is no society or conversation to kind. For which reason, he gives his be kept up in the world without good- fons a positive order not to enthrine it nature, or something which must bear in gold or silver, but to lay it in the it's appearance, and supply it's place. earth as soon as the life was gone out For this reason mankind have been of it. forced to invent a kind of artificial hu An instance of such an overflowing manity, which is what we express by of humanity, such an exuberant love to the word Good-breeding. For if we mankind, could not have entered into examine thoroughly the idea of what the imagination of a writer, who had we call so, we thall find it to be nothing not a foul filled with great ideas, and a elle but an imitation and mimicry of general benevolence to mankind.

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