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who know the world have seen it more ance, if not subservience, to his vices, than once.

I have often, with secret must be the measures of your conduet. pity, heard the same man who has pro When it comes to that, the unnatural fessed his abhorrence against all kind of state a man lives in, when his patron pallive behaviour, lose minutes, hours, pleases, is ended; and his guilt and corndays, and years, in a fruitless attend. plaisance are objected to him, though ance on one who had no inclination to the man who rejects him for vices, was befriend him. It is very much to be not only his partner but seducer. Thus regretted, that the great have one parti. the client, like a young woman who cular privilege above the reit of the has given up the innocence which made world, of being flow in receiving im- her charming, has not only lost his tiine, pressions of kindness, and quick in but also the virtue which could render taking offence. The elevation above the him capable of resenting the injury which rest of inankind, except in very great is done him. minds, makes men lo giddy, that they It would be endless to recount the do not see after the same manner they tricks of turning you off from themselves did before: thus they despise their old to persons who have less power to serve friends, and strive to extend their inte. you, the art of being sorry for such an rests to new pretenders. By this means unaccountable accident in your behaviit often happens that when you come to our, that such a one, who, perhaps, has know how you lost such an employment, never heard of you, opposes your ad

you will find the man who got it never vancement; and if you have any thing I dreamed of it; but forsooth, he was to more than ordinary in you, you are flat

be surprised into it, or perhaps solicited tered with a whisper, that it is no wonder to receive it. Upon such occasions as people are so now in doing for a man of these a man may perhaps grow out of your talents and the like. Humour; if you are fo, all niankind will After all this treatment, I must fill add fall in with the patron, and you are an the pleasantest infolence of all, which I humourist and untractable if you are have once or twice feen; to wit, that when capable of being four at a disappoint- a filly rogue has thrown away one part in ment: but it is the fame thing, whether three of his life in unprofitable attendyou do or do not resent ill usage, you ance, it is taken wonderfully ill that will be used after the same manner; as he withdraws, and is resolved to emsome good mothers will be sure to whip ploy the rest for himself. their children until they cry, and then When we consider these things, and whip them for crying.

reflect upon so many honest natures, There are but two ways of doing any which one, who makes observations of thing with great people, and those are what passes, may have seen, that have by making yourself either considerable miscarried by such fort of applications, or agrecable: the former is not to be at it is too melancholy a scene to dwell tained but by finding a way to live upon; therefore I shall take another opwithout them, or concealing that you portunity to discourse of good patrons, want them; the latter is only by falling and distinguish such as have done their into their taste and pleasures: this is of duty to those who have depended upon all the employments in the world the them, and were not able to act without most servile, except it happens to be of their favour. Worthy patrons are like your own natural humour. For to be Plato's guardian angels, who are always agreeable to another, especially if he be doing good to their wards; but negliabove you, is not to be poslcifed of such gent patrons are like Epicurus's gods, qualities and accomplishments as thould that lie lolling on the clouds, and inrender you agreeable in yourself, but such stead of blettings pour down tornis and as make you agreeable in respect to him. tempests on the heads of those that are An imitation of his faults, or a complia offering incense to them.

T

NO CCXV.

No CCXV. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6.

INGENVAS DIDICISSE FIDELITER ARTES
EMOLLIT MORES, NEC SINIT ESSE FEROS.

Ovip. Ep.1x. L. II. DE PONTO, V. 47.

INGENVOUS ARTS, WHERE THEY AN ENTRANCE FIND,
SOFTEN THE MANNERS, AND SUBDUE THE MIND.

I

cation like marble in the quarry, which appears in these poor wretches on which shews none of it's inherent beau- many occasions, be raised to, were it ties, until the skill of the polisher fetches rightly cultivated? And what colour of out the colours, makes the surface thine, excuse can there be for the contempt and discovers every ornamental cloud, with which we treat this part of our spec spot, and vein that runs through the cies? That we should not put them upon boly of it. Education, after the same the common foot of humanity, that we manner, when it works upon a noble should only set an insignificant fine upon mind, draws out to view every latent the man who murders them; nay, that virtue and perfection, which without we should, as much as in us lies, cut fuch helps are never able to make their them off from the prospects of happiness appearance.

in another world as well as in this, and If my reader will give me leave to deny them that which we look upon as change the allusion fo loon upon him, I the proper means for attaining it? fhall make use of the same instance to Since I am engaged on this subject, I illustrate the force of education, which cannot forbear mentioning a story which Aristotle has brought to explain his I have lately heard, and which is so well doctrine of substantial forms, when he attested, that I have no manner of reatells us that a statue lies hid in a block of son to suspect the truth of it. I may marble; and that the art of the statuary call it a kind of wild tragedy that parted only clears away the superfluous matter, about twelve years ago at St. Christoand removes the rubbish. The figure phers, one of our British leeward islands. is in the stone, the sculptor only finds it. The negroes who were the persons conWhat sculpture is to a block of marble, cerned in it, were all of them the slaves education is to an human soul. The phi- of a gentleman who is now in England. losopher, the faint, or the hero, the wise, This gentleman among his negroes the good, or the great man, very often had a young woman, who was looked lie hidand concealed in a plebeian, which upon as a most extraordinary beauty by a proper education might have dis-inter- those of her own complexion. He had red, and have brought to light. I am at the same time two young fellows who therefore much delighted with reading were likewise negroes and llaves, rethe accounts of savage nations, and with markable for the comeliness of their contemplating those virtues which are persons, and for the friendship which wild and uncultivated; to see courage they bore to one another. It unfortuexerting itself in fierceness, resolution in nately happened that both of them fell obftinacy, wisdom in cunning, patience in love with the female negroe abovein fullenness and despair.

mentioned, who would have been very Men's passions operate variously, and glad to have taken either of them for her appear in different kinds of actions, ac husband, provided they could agree becording as they are more or less rectified tween themselves which thould be the and swayed by reason. When one hears But they were both so passioof negroes, who upon the death of their nately in love with her, that neither of matters, or upon changing their service, them could think of giving her up to hang themselves upon the next tree, as his rival; and at the same time were so it frequently happens in our American true to one another, that neither of thein plantations, who can forbear admiring would think of gaining her without his their fidelity, thougl: it expresses it- friend's confent. The torments of these felf in so dreadful a manner? What two lovers were the discourse of the fa

mily

man.

3G

mily to which they belonged, who could the inhabitants of those nations of which not fofbear observing the strange com. I have been here speaking; as those who plication of passions which perplexed the have had the adrantage of a more liberal hearts of the poor negroes, that often education, rise above one another by dropped expressions of the uneasiness several different degrees of perfection. they underwent, and how impossible it for to return to our statue in the block was for either of them ever to be happy. of marble, we see it sometimes only

After a long struggle between love - begun to be chipped, sometimes rougti. and friendship, truth and jealousy, they hewn, and but just sketched into an one day took a walk together in a wood, human figure; sometimes we see the carrying their mistress along with them : man appearing distinctly in all his limbs where, after abundance of lamentations, and features, fonietimes we find the fithey stabbed her to the heart, of which gure wrought up to a great elegancy, The immediately died. A Nave who was but seldom meet with any to which the at his work not far from the place where hand of a Phidias or Praxiteles could this astonishing piece of cruelty was com not give several nice touches and finishmitted, hearing the Irieks of the dying ings. person, ran to see what was the occa. Discourses of morality, and reflec. fion of them. He there discovered the tions upon human nature, are the best woman lying dead upon the ground, means we can make use of to improve with the two negroes on each side of her, our minds, and gain a true knowledge killing the dead corpse, weeping over it, of ourselves, and consequently to reand beating their breaits in the agonies cover our souls out of the vice, igroof grief and despair. He immediately rance, and prejudice, which naturally ran to the English family with the news cleave to them. I have all along proof what he had seen; who upon coming fest myself in this paper a promoter of to the place saw the woman dead, and these great ends; and I fatter myself the two negroes expiring by her with that I do from day to day contribute wounds they had given themselves. something to the polishing of men's We see in this amazing instance of minds: at least my design is laudable

, barbarity, what ftrange disorders are whatever the execution may be. I mult bred in the minds of those men whofe confess I am not a little encouraged in passions are not regulated by virtue, and it by many letters which I receive from disciplined by reason. Though the unknown hands, in approbation of my metion which I have here recited is in endeavours; and must take this opparitself full of guilt and horror, it pro- tunity of returning my thanks to thole ceeded from a temper of mind which who write them, and excusing myself might have produced very noble fruits, for not inserting several of them in my had it been informed and guided by a papers, which I am fenfible would be a suitable education.

very great ornament to them. Should It is therefore an unspeakable blessing I publish the praises which are so well to be born in those parts of the world penned, they would do honour to the where wisdom and knowledge flourish; persons who write them, but my pubthough it must be confeffed, there are, lithing of them would I fear be a fuf. cven in these parts, several poor unin- ficient instance to the world that I did fti ucted persuns, who are but little above not deserve them.

с

No CCXVI.

No CCXVI. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7

SIQUIDEM HERCLE POSSIS, NIL PRIUS, NEQUE FORTIUS;
VERUM SI INCIPIES, NEQUE PERFICIES NAVITER,
ATQUE, UBI PATI NON POTERIS, CUM NEMO EXPETET,
INFECTA PACE, ULTRO AD IAM VENIES, INDICANS
TE AMARE, ET FERRE NON POSSE: ACTUM EST, ILICET,
PERISTI: ELUDET, VBI TE VICTUM SENSERIT.

TER. EUN. ACT 1. SC. 1.
IF INDEED YOU CAN KEEP TO YOUR RESOLUTION, YOU WILL ACT A NOBLE AND

A MANLY PART: BUT IF, WHEN YOU HAVE SET ABOUT IT, YOUR COURAGE TAILS YOU, AND YOU MAKE A VOLUNTARY SUBMISSION, ACKNOWLEDGING THE VIOLENCE OF YOUR PASSION, AND YOUR INABILITY TO HOLD OUT ANY LONGER, ALL IS OVER WITH YOU; YOU ARE UNDONE, AND MAY GO HANG YOURSELF; SHE WILL INSULT OYIR YOU, WHEN SHE FINDS YOU HER SLAVE.

THI

TO THE SPECTATOR.

cup was thrown in the fire; and with.

out taking vengeance on her spouse, the SIR,

faid of me, that I was a pretending coxa HIS is to inform you, that Mr. comb, a medier that knew not what it Freeman had no sooner taken

was to interpole in so nice an affair as coach, but his lady was taken with a between a man and his wife. To which terrible fit of the vapours, which it is Mr. Freeman- Madam, were I less feared will make her miscarry, if not . fond of you than I am, I should not endanger her life; therefore, dear Sir,

• have taken this way of writing to the if you know of any receipt that is good

Spectator, to inform a woman whom against this fashionable reigning diltem • God and nature lias placed under my per, be pleased to communicate it for

direction, with what I request of her; the good of the public, and you will

' but since you are so indiscreet as not oblige yours,

to take the hint which I gave you in A. NOEWILL.

that paper, I must tell you, Madam,

' in so many words, that you have for MR. SPECTATOR,

a long and tedious space of time acted THE uproar was so great as soon as a part unsuitable to the sense your

I had read the Spectator concern ought to have of the subordination in ing Mrs. Freeman, that after many re which you are placed. And I mult volutions in her temper, of raging, ' acquaint you once for all, that the fwooning, railing, fainting, pitying

• fellow without-Ah, Tom!' (here the herself, and reviling her husband, upon

footinan entered and answered - Maan accidental coming-in of a neigh • dam.') Sirrah, do not you know bouring lady, who says she has writ to my voice? Look upon me when I you also, she had nothing left for it but speak to you :--I say, Madam, this to fall in a fit. I had the honour to « fellow here is to know of me myself, read the paper to her, and have a pretty ' whether I am at leiture to see company good command of my countenance and

I am from this boul matir temper on such occasions; and foon of this house; and my butinefs in it, found my historical name to be Tom ' and every where elle, is to behave Meggot in your writings, but conceal ' myself in rich a manner, as it hall be ed my felf until I saw how it affected ' hereafter an honour to you to bear my Mrs. Freeman. She looked frequently • namé; and your pride, that you are at her husband, as often at me; and the ' the delight, the darling and ornament did not tremble as the filled tea, until • of a man of honour, useful and esteemthe came to the circumstance of Arm • ed by his friends; and I no longer Strong's writing out a piece of Tully one that has buried some mcrit in the for an opera tune: then the burst out, • world, in compliance to a froward she was exposed, the was deceived, the « humour which has grown upon an was wronged and abused, The 102. agreeable woman by his indulgence.”

Mr.

or not.

3 G 2

Mr. Freeman ended this with a tender- round the room in a moment, antil the ness in his aspect and a downcast eye, lady I spoke of above and servants enwhich Mewel he was extremely moved tered; upon which she fell on a couch at the anguish he saw her in; for the lat as breathless. I still kept up my friend; swelling with paffion, and her eyes firm- but he, with a very hilly air, bid them ly fixed on the fire; when I, fearing bring a coach to the door, and we went he would lose all again, took upon me off, I being forced to bid the coachman to provoke her out of that amiable for- drive on. We were no sooner come to row she was in, to fall upon me; upon my lodgings, but all his wife's relawhich I said very seasonably for my tions came to enquire after him; and friend, that indeed Mr. Freeman was Mrs. Freeman's mother writ a note, become the common talk of the town; wherein she thought never to have seen and that nothing was so much a jest, as this day, and so forth. when it was said in company - Mr. In a word, Sir, I am afraid we are • Freeman has promised to come to such upon a thing we have not talents for; • a place.' Upon which the good lady and I can observe already, my friend turned her loftness into downright rage, look upon me rather as a man who and threw the scalding tea-kettle upon knows a weakness of him that he is your humble servant; flew into the ashamed of, than one who has rescued middle of the room, and cried out she him from lavery. Mr. Spectator, I was the unfortunatest of all women: ‘am but a young fellow, and if Mt. others kept family dissatisfactions for Freeman submits, I shall be looked hours of privacy and retirement; no upon as an incendiary, and never get a apology was to be made to her, no ex wife as long as I breathe. He has inpedient to be found, no previous man deed fent word home he fall lie at ner of breaking what was amiss in her; Hampstead to-night; but I believe fear but all the world was to be acquainted of the first onset after this rupture has with her errors, without the least ad

too great a place in this resolution. monition. Mr. Freeman was going to Mrs. Freeman has a very pretty lifter; make a foftening speech, but I inter- fuppose I delivered him up, and articled posed Look you, Madam, I have with the mother for her for bringing * nothing to say to this matter, but you him home. If he has not courage to

ought to consider you are now past a stand it, you are a great cafuift, is it

chicken; this humour, which was such an ill thing to bring myself off as • well enough in a girl, is infufferable well as I can? What makes me doubt in one of your motherly character.' my man, is, that I find he thinks it With that the lost all patience, and flew reasonable to expostulate at least with directly at her husband's periwig. I her; and Captain Sentry will tell you, got her in my arms, and defended my if

let your orders be disputed, you friend: he making signs at the same are no longer a commander. I wish time that it was too much; I beckoning, you could advise me how to get clear nodding, and frowning over her shouls of this business handsomely. Yours, der, that he was lost if he did not per.

TOM MEGGOT. $ft. In this manner she flew round and T

you

NO CCXVII. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8,

TUNC FOLMINA SIMPLEX
IT PARITER TOTO REPITITUR CLAMOR AS ANTRO.

Juv. Sat. VI. VIR. 26
THEN, UNRESTRAIN'D BY RULES OF DECENCY,
TH' ASSIMBLED FIMALIS RAISI A GINERAL CRY.

I Shall entertain my reader to-day to fancy, that the writer of it, whoever

with some letters from my corres' fe is, has formed a kind of nocturnal fpondents. The firft of them is the de- orgie out of her own fancy: whether fcription of a club, whether real or ima- this be fo or not, her letter may con?.. ginary, I cannot determine; but an apt duce to the amendment of that kind of

perfors

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