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274

THE HOPELESS LOVER

TEL

'ELL me not how fair she is;

have no mind to hear
the story of that distant bliss

I never shall come near :
by sad experience I have found
that her perfection is my wound.
And tell me not how fond I am

to tempt my daring fate
from whence no triumph ever came,

but to repent too late :
there is some hope ere long I may
in silence dote myself away.
I ask no pity, Love, from thee,

nor will thy justice blame,
so that thou wilt not envy me

the glory of my flame:
which crowns my heart whene'er it dies,
in that it falls her sacrifice.

H. KING

275

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THE RESTORATION OF HELLAS
S an eagle, fed with morning,

scorns the embattled tempest's warning,
when she seeks her aerie hanging

in the mountain-cedar's hair,
and her brood expect the clanging

of her wings through the wild air,
sick with famine ;-Freedom so
to what of Greece remaineth now
returns; her hoary ruins glow
like orient mountains lost in day;

beneath the safety of her wings
her renovated nurselings play,

and in the naked lightnings
of truth they purge their dazzled eyes.
Let Freedom leave, where'er she flies,
a Desert, or a Paradise ;
let the beautiful and the brave,
share her glory, or a grave.

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P. B. SHELLEY

276

THE TREASURES OF THE DEEP

WHAT

THAT hidest thou in thy treasure-caves and cells,

thou hollow-sounding and mysterious main ? pale glistening pearls, and rainbow-coloured shells, bright things which gleam unrecked of and in vain. Keep, keep thy riches, melancholy sea !

We ask not such from thee. Yet more! the billows and the depths have more ! high hearts and brave are gathered to thy breast ! they hear not now the booming waters roar, the battle-thunders will not break their rest : keep thy red gold and gems, thou stormy grave

give back the true and brave ! Give back the lost and lovely! those for whom the place was kept at board and hearth so long ; the prayer went up through midnight's breathless

gloom, and the vain yearning woke midst festal song ! Hold fast thy buried isles, thy towers o'erthrown, -But all is not thine own!

F. HEMANS

277

OUR SORROWES STILL PURSUE

TO MY HONOURED FRIEND, SIR E. P. KNIGHT

OE find some whispering shade neare Arne or Poe,

your weary'd limbs, and see if all those faire

enchantments can charme griefe or care.
Our sorrowes still pursue us, and when you

the ruined capitoll shall view
and statues, a disordered heape ; you can

not cure yet the disease of man,
and banish youre owne thoughts. Goe travaile where

another Sun and starres appeare,
and land not toucht by any covetous fleet,

and yet even there youre selfe youle meete.

Stay here then, and while curious exiles find

new toyes for a fantastique mind;
enjoy at home what's reall: here the Spring

by her aeriall quires doth sing
as sweetly to you as if you were laid
ynder the learned Thessalian shade.

W. HABINGTON

278

HYMN TO CONTENTMENT

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OVELY, lasting peace of mind !

sweet delight of human kind !
heavenly-born and bred on high,
to crown the favourites of the sky
with more of happiness below
than victors in a triumph know;
lovely, lasting peace appear !
this world itself, if thou art here,
is once again with Eden blest,
and man contains it in his breast.”

'Twas thus, as under shade I stood,
I sung my wishes to the wood:
it seemed as all the quiet place
confessed the presence of the Grace;
when thus she spoke :-“Go rule thy will:
bid thy wild passions all be still ;
know God, and bring thy heart to know
the joys which from religion flow:
then every grace shall prove its guest,
and I'll be there to crown the rest."

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Though, alas! too late I find,

nothing can her fancy fix;
yet the moment she is kind,
I forgive her all her tricks;

which though I see,
I can't get free;
she deceiving,

I believing;
what need lovers wish for more?

SIR C. SEDLEY 280

FAITHFUL LOVE
SK me no more, my truth to prove,

with thee I would in exile go
to regions of eternal snow;
o'er floods by solid ice confined :
thro' forest bare with northern wind:
while all around my eyes I cast
where all is wild and all is waste.
If there the timorous stag you chase,
or rouse to fight a fiercer race,
undaunted I thy arms would bear
and give thy hand the hunter's spear :
beneath the mountain's hollow brow,
or in its rocky cells below,
thy rural feast I would provide ;
nor envy palaces their pride ;
the softest moss should dress thy bed,
with savage spoils about thee spread :
while faithful love the watch should keep,
to banish danger from thy sleep.

E. TOLLET
THE DESCRIPTION OF CASTARA
IKE the violet which alone

prospers in some happy shade;
my Castara lives unknown,
to no looser eye betrayed ;

for she's to herself untrue

who delights i’ the public view.
Such is her beauty, as no arts
have enriched with borrowed grace ;
her high birth no pride imparts,
for she blushes, in her place.

281

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Folly boasts a glorious blood,

she is noblest being good.
She sails by that rock, the court,
where oft honour splits her mast;
and retiredness thinks the port
where her fame may anchor cast;

virtue safely cannot sit
where vice is enthroned for wit.

W. HABINGTON

282

THE EDUCATION OF NATURE

HE shall be sportive as the fawn

or up the mountain springs;
and her's shall be the breathing balm,
and her's the silence and the calm

of mute insensate things.

The floating clouds their state shall lend
to her; for her the willow bend :

nor shall she fail to see
e'en in the motions of the storm
grace that shall mould the maiden's form

by silent sympathy.

The stars of midnight shall be dear
to her; and she shall lean her ear

in many a secret place
where rivulets dance their wayward round,
and beauty born of murmuring sound
shall pass into her face.

W. WORDSWORTH

283

NE NIMIVM ADOLESCENTIÆ FIDAT

ET not thy youth and false delights

but waste thy time, which posts away
like wings unseen and swift as they.
Beauty is but meer paint, whose dye
with time's breath will dissolve and flye,
'tis wax, ’tis water, 'tis a glass,
it melts, breaks and away doth pass.

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