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Stay here then, and while curious exiles find

new toyes for a fantastique mind;
enjoy at home what's reall: here the Spring

by her aeriall quires doth sing
as sweetly to you as if you were laid
ynder the learned Thessalian shade.

W. HABINGTON

278

HYMN TO CONTENTMENT
“LOVE
OVELY, lasting peace of mind !

sweet delight of human kind !
heavenly-born and bred on high,
to crown the favourites of the sky
with more of happiness below
than victors in a triumph know;
lovely, lasting peace appear !
this world itself, if thou art here,
is once again with Eden blest,
and man contains it in his breast.”

'Twas thus, as under shade I stood,
I sung my wishes to the wood :
it seemed as all the quiet place
confessed the presence of the Grace;
when thus she spoke :—“Go rule thy will :
bid thy wild passions all be still ;
know God, and bring thy heart to know
the joys which from religion flow:
then every grace shall prove its guest,
and I'll be there to crown the rest."

T. PARNELL

279

PHILLIS

PHILLIS

HILLIS is my only joy,

faithless as the winds or seas:
sometimes coming, sometimes coy,
yet she never fails to please;

if with a frown
I am cast down,
Phillis smiling

and beguiling
makes me happier than before.

Though, alas! too late I find,

nothing can her fancy fix;
yet the moment she is kind,
I forgive her all her tricks;

which though I see,
I can't get free;
she deceiving,

I believing;
what need lovers wish for more?

SIR C. SEDLEY 280

FAITHFUL LOVE
SK me no more, my truth to prove,

with thee I would in exile go
to regions of eternal snow;
o'er floods by solid ice confined:
thro' forest bare with northern wind:
while all around my eyes I cast
where all is wild and all is waste.
If there the timorous stag you chase,
or rouse to fight a fiercer race,
undaunted I thy arms would bear
and give thy hand the hunter's spear :
beneath the mountain's hollow brow,
or in its rocky cells below,
thy rural feast I would provide ;
nor envy palaces their pride;
the softest moss should dress thy bed,
with savage spoils about thee spread:
while faithful love the watch should keep,
to banish danger from thy sleep.

E. TOLLET
THE DESCRIPTION OF CASTARA
IKE the violet which alone

prospers in some happy shade;
my Castara lives unknown,
to no looser eye betrayed ;

for she's to herself untrue

who delights i' the public view.
Such is her beauty, as no arts
have enriched with borrowed grace ;
her high birth no pride imparts,
for she blushes in her place,

281

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Folly boasts a glorious blood,

she is noblest being good.
She sails by that rock, the court,
where oft honour splits her mast;
and retiredness thinks the port
where her fame may anchor cast;

virtue safely cannot sit
where vice is enthroned for wit.

W. HABINGTON

282

THE EDUCATION OF NATURE

HE shall be sportive as the fawn

or up the mountain springs;
and her's shall be the breathing balm,
and her's the silence and the calm

of mute insensate things.

The floating clouds their state shall lend
to her; for her the willow bend :

nor shall she fail to see
e'en in the motions of the storm
grace that shall mould the maiden's form

by silent sympathy.

The stars of midnight shall be dear
to her; and she shall lean her ear

in many a secret place
where rivulets dance their wayward round,
and beauty born of murmuring sound
shall pass into her face.

W. WORDSWORTH

283

NE NIMIVM ADOLESCENTIÆ FIDAT

L

ET not thy youth and false delights

cheat thee of life; those heady flights
but waste thy time, which posts away
like wings unseen and swift as they.
Beauty is but meer paint, whose dye
with time's breath will dissolve and flye,
'tis wax, 'tis water, 'tis a glass,
it melts, breaks and away doth pass.

'tis like a rose, which in the dawn
the air with gentle breath doth fawn
and whisper too, but in the hours
of night is sullied with smart showers.
Life spent is wish'd for but in vain,
nor can past years come back again :
happy the Man who in this vale
redeems his time, shutting out all
thoughts of the world, whose longing eyes
are ever pilgrims in the skies,
that views his bright home, and desires
to shine amongst those glorious fires.

H, VAUGHAN

284

ADVERSA ÆQVO ANIMO FERENDA ESSE

IF

weeping eyes could wash away

those evils they mourn for night and day,
then glad I to cure my fears
with my best jewels would buy tears.
But, as dew feeds the growing corn,
so crosses that are grown forlorn
increase with grief, tears make tears way,
and cares kept up keep cares in pay.
That wretch whom Fortune finds to fear
and melting still into a tear,
she strikes more boldly; but a face
silent and dry doth her amaze.
Then leave thy tears, and tedious tale
of what thou dost misfortunes call :
what thou by weeping think'st to ease,
doth by thy passion but increase,
hard things to soft will never yield,
'tis the dry eye that wins the field;
a noble patience quells the spite
of Fortune, and disarms her quite.

H, VAUGHAN

285

THE WARRIOR TO HIS DEAD BRIDE

IF

F in the fight my arm was strong

and forced my foes to yield,

if conquering and unhurt I came

back from the battle-field-
it is because thy prayers have been

my safeguard and my shield.
Thy heart, my own, still beats in Heaven

with the same love divine
that made thee stoop to such a soul,

so hard, so stern, as mine-
my eyes have learnt to weep, beloved,

since last they looked on thine.
I hear thee murmur words of peace

through the dim midnight air,
and a calm falls from the angel stars,

and soothes my great despair-
the Heavens themselves look brighter, love,
since thy sweet soul is there.

A, A. PROCTER

286 TO THE JEWS TO MOURN FOR THEIR DESTRUCTION

CONSID
ONSIDER ye and call for the mourning women

that they may come ;
and send for cunning women, that they may come:
and let them make haste,
and take up a wailing for us,
that our eyes may run down with tears,
and our eyelids gush out with waters.
For a voice of wailing is heard out of Zion,
“How are we spoiled, we are greatly confounded,
because we have forsaken the land,
because our dwellings have cast us out!
Yet hear the word of the Lord, O ye women,
and let your ear receive the word of his mouth,
and teach your daughters wailing,
and every one her neighhpur lamentation.
For death is come up into our windows,
to cut off the children from without
and the young men from the streets :
the carcases of men shall fall as dung
upon the open field,
and as the handful after the harvestman,
and none shall gather them.

JEREMIAH

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