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and on her wings above the spheres
to the true light his spirit bears.

H. VAUGHAN

434

ON THE UNCERTAINTY OF FORTUNE

LE

EAVE off unfit complaints and clear
from sighs your breast, and from black clouds

your brow,
when the sun shines not with his wonted cheer,
and fortune throws an averse cast for you.

That sea, which vext with Notus is,
the merry west-winds will to-morrow kiss.

The sun to-day rides drousily,
to-morrow 'twill put on a look more fair,
laughter and groaning do alternately
return, and tears sport's nearest neighbours are.

'Tis by the gods appointed so,
that good fate should with mingled dangers flow.

Who drave his oxen yesterday
doth now over the noblest Romans reign,
and on the Gabii and the Cures lay
the yoke which from the oxen he had ta’en.

Whom Hesperus saw poor and low
this morning's eye beholds him greatest now.

If fortune knit amongst her play
but seriousness; he shall again go home
to his old country-farm of yesterday,
to scoffing people no mean jest become:

and with the crowned axe, which he
had ruled the world, go back and prune some tree;

nay, if he want the fuel cold requires,
with his own fasces he shall make him fires.

A. COWLEY

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THOUGH frost and snow lock?d from mine eyes

,

the gardens, orchards, walks, that so
I might not all thy pleasures know;
yet, Saxham, thou, within thy gate,
art of thyself so delicate,

so full of native sweets, that bless
thy roof with inward happiness;
as neither from, nor to thy store,
winter takes aught, or spring adds more.
The stranger's welcome each man there
stamped on his cheerful brow doth wear;
nor doth this welcome, or his cheer,
grow less, 'cause he stays longer here.
There's none observes, much less repines,
how often this man sups or dines.
Thou hast no porter at the door
ť examine or keep back the poor;
nor locks nor bolts; thy gates have been
made only to let strangers in:
untaught to shut, they do not fear
to stand wide open all the year;
careless who enters, for they know
thou never didst deserve a foe;
and as for thieves, thy bounty's such,
they cannot steal, thou giv'st so much.

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The sea hath hung it round with its wild weed, no place can there be found for better seed. Storm-beaten rock! no change 'tis thine to know, only the water's range

of ebb and flow. The happy sounds of earth are not for thee, the voice of human mirth, of children's glee: no song of birds is thine, no crown of flowers! say, dost thou not repine through long lone

hours?

Yet stars for thee are bright in midnight skies, and tranquil worlds of light around thee rise : they smoothe thine ocean-bed, its heavings cease, while they, from o'er thy head, breathe on thee peace.

are

The wearied man of grief like thee I deem,
to whom comes no relief

through life's dark

dream. No human ties are left,

earth's hopes

gone; he dwells, a thing bereft- blighted-alone. Yet o'er him from above bright spirits bend, and He whose name is Love, calls him His friend; and thus he thankful learns why grief was given, and trusting, peaceful, turns to God in Heaven.

T. V. FOSBERY

437

THE SATYR CARRYING ALEXIS

Swith this burden full of woe,

as

through still silence of the night,
guided by the glow-worm's light,
hither am I come at last.
Many a thicket have I past;
not a twig that durst deny me
not a bush that durst descry me,
to the little bird that sleeps
on the tender spray; nor creeps
that hardy worm with pointed tail,
but if I be under sail,
flying faster than the wind,
leaving all the clouds behind,
but doth hide her tender head
in some hollow tree, or bed
of seeded nettles; not a hare
can be started from his fare
by my footing; nor a wish
is more sudden, nor a fish
can be found with greater ease
cut the vast unbounded seas,
leaving neither print nor sound,
than I, when nimbly on the ground
I measure many a league an hour.

J. FLETCHER

438

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OVELY nymph, with eye serene,

dimpled smile, and frolic mien ;
come, with airy step advancing,
come, with blooming Hebe dancing:
o'er the meads I see thee straying-
Youth and Sport around thee playing-
gay Content, thy sister fair,
twines a garland round thy hair.
Thine the lips of roseate dye;
thine the pleasure-sparkling eye ;
thine the cheek that softly glows,
brighter than the blushing rose!
guide me to thy favourite bowers,
to deck thy rural shrine with flowers.
In thy lowly, sylvan cell,
Peace and Virtue love to dwell ;
ever let me own thy sway,
still to thee my tribute pay
when Zephyr waves his balmy wing,

to kiss the sweets of May ;
when the soft melodies of spring

resound from every spray ;
with thee, sweet maid ! I'll rove along,

and tread the morning dews;
to hear the wood-lark's early song,

to court the laughing muse.

F. HEMANS

439

TO VENICE

UN-GIRT City! thou hast been

, ;

now is come a darker day,
and thou soon must be his prey,
if the power that raised thee here
hallow so thy watery bier.
A less drear ruin then than now
with thy conquest-branded brow
stooping to the slave of slaves
from thy throne among the waves,
wilt thou be,—when the sea-mew
flies, as once before it flew,

o'er thine isles depopulate,
and all is in its ancient state,
save where many a palace-gate
with green sea-flowers overgrown,
like a rock of ocean's own,
topples o'er the abandon'd sea
as the tides change sullenly.
The fisher on his watery way
wandering at the close of day,
will spread his sail and seize his oar
till he pass the gloomy shore,
lest thy dead should, from their sleep
bursting o'er the starlight deep,
lead a rapid masque of death
o'er the waters of his path.

P. B. SHELLEY

440 YEShe land of many hues,

TES, I remember well

whose charms what praise can tell,

whose praise what heart refuse?
Sublime, but neither bleak nor bare,
nor misty are the mountains there,-
softly sublime, profusely fair !
up to their summits clothed in green,
and fruitful as the vales between,

they lightly rise

and scale the skies,
and groves and gardens still abound;

for where no shoot

could else take root,
the peaks are shelved and terraced round;
earthward appear, in mingled growth,

the mulberry and maize,-above
the trellised vine extends to both

the leafy shade they love.
Looks out the white-walled cottage here,
the lowly chapel rises near;
far down the foot must roam to reach
the lovely lake and bending beach;
whilst chestnut green and olive grey
chequer the steep and winding way.

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