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ARK, how the birds do sing

and woods do ring:
all creatures have their joy and man hath his.

Yet, if we rightly measure,

man's joy and pleasure
rather hereafter, than in present, is.

To this life things of sense

make their pretence:
in the other Angels have a right by birth:

man ties them both alone,

and makes them one, with the one hand touching heaven, with the other

earth.

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But as his joys are double,

so is his trouble:
he hath two winters, other things but one:

both frosts and thoughts do nip:

and bite his lip;
and he of all things fears two deaths alone.

Yet even the greatest griefs

may be reliefs,
could he but take them right, and in their ways.

Happy is he, whose heart

hath found the art
to turn his double pains to double praise.

G. HERBERT

491

OR

TO CONTEMPLATION
R lead me where amid the tranquil vale

the broken stream flows on in silver light, and I will linger where the gale

o'er the bank of violets sighs,
listening to hear its softened sounds arise ;

and hearken the dull beetle's drowsy flight:
and watch the horn-eyed snail
creep o'er his long moon-glittering trail,

and mark where radiant through the night moves in the grass-green hedge the glow-worm's

living light.
Thee, meekest power! I love to meet,

as oft with even solitary pace

the scattered abbey's hallowed rounds I trace,
and listen to the echoings of my feet.

Or on the half-demolished tomb,
whose warning texts anticipate my doom,

mark the clear orb of night
cast through the storying glass a faintly-varied light.

But sweeter 'tis to wander wild
by melancholy dreams beguiled,
while the summer moon's pale ray
faintly guides me on my way
to the lone romantic glen
far from all the haunts of men,
where no noise of uproar rude
breaks the calm of solitude:
but soothing silence sleeps in all,
save the neighbouring waterfall,
whose hoarse waters falling near
load with hollow sounds the ear,
and with down-dasht torrent white
gleam hoary through the shades of night.

R. SOUTHEY

492

THE PRAYER OF HABAKKUK THE PROPHET

O Lord, I have heard thy speech, and was afraid:
O Lord, revive thy work in the midst of the years;
in wrath remember mercy.
God came from Teman,
and the Holy one from Mount Paran:
His glory covered the heavens,
and the earth was full of His praise,
Before Him went the pestilence,
and burning coals went forth at His feet:
and His brightness was as the light:
He had bright beams coming out of His side,
and there was the hiding of His power:
Thy bow was made quite naked.
I saw the tents of Cushan in affliction,
and the curtains of the land of Midian did tremble.
He stood and measured the earth:
He beheld, and drove asunder the nations;
F. S. II.

17

and the everlasting mountains were scattered,
the perpetual hills did bow.
Thou didst cleave the earth with rivers:
Thou didst walk through the sea with Thine horses,
through the heap of great waters.
The mountains saw Thee and they trembled,
the stream of water overflowed:
the deep uttered his voice,
and lifted up his hands on high:
the sun and moon stood still in their habitation:
at the light of Thine arrows they went,
and at the shining of Thy glittering spear.
Was the Lord displeased against the rivers ?
was Thy wrath against the sea,
that Thou didst ride upon Thine horses
and Thy chariots of salvation?
They came out as a whirlwind to scatter me:
their rejoicing was as to devour the poor secretly;
Thou didst march through the land in indignation,
Thou didst thresh the heathen in anger.
When I heard, my belly trembled:
my lips quivered at the voice:
rottenness entered into my bones,
and I trembled in myself,
that I might rest in the day of trouble:
when he cometh up unto the people,
he will invade them with his troops.
Although the fig-tree shall not blossom,
neither shall fruit be in the vines,
the labour of the olive shall fail,
and the fields shall yield no meat;
the flock shall be cut off from the fold,
and there shall be no herd in the stalls:
yet I will rejoice in the Lord,
I will joy in the God of my salvation.
The Lord God is my strength,
and He will make my feet like hinds' feet,
and He will make me to walk upon mine high places.

493

PROPHECY OF THE DESTRUCTION OF TYRE

Ezekiel xxvi. 2-21.

494 DENUNCIATION OF GOD'S JUDGMENTS AGAINST

THE JEWS
Isaiah v.

495 THANKSGIVING OF THE FAITHFUL FOR THE

MERCIES OF GOD

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501 LAMENTATION OVER THE MISERY OF JERUSALEM

Lamentations ii. 8—15.

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506 TO THE MEMORY OF THE FIRST LADY LYTTELTON

OFT
FT would the Dryads of these woods rejoice

to hear her heavenly voice;
for her despising, when she deigned to sing,

the sweetest songsters of the spring:
the woodlark and the linnet pleased no more;

the nightingale was mute

and every shepherd's flute

was cast in silent scorn away,
while all attended to her sweeter lay.
Ye larks and linnets now resume your song,

and thou, melodious Philomel,

again this plaintive story tell; for death has stopped that tuneful tongue, whose music could alone your warbling notes excel.

In vain I look around,

o'er all the well-known ground,
my Lucy's wonted footsteps to descry;

where oft we us'd to walk,

where oft in tender talk
we saw the summer sun go down the sky;

nor by yon fountain's side,

nor where its waters glide
along the valley, can she now be found:
in all the wide-stretch'd prospect's ample bound

no more my mournful eye

can aught of her espy, but the sad sacred earth where her dear relics lie.

507

So, where the silent streams of Liris glide,
in the soft bosom of Campania's vale,
when now the wintry tempests all are fled,
and genial Summer breathes her gentle gale,
the verdant orange lifts its beauteous head;
from every branch the balmy flowerets rise,
on every bough the golden fruits are seen;
with odours sweet it fills the smiling skies,
the wood-nymphs tend it, and th’ Idalian queen:
but, in the midst of all its blooming pride,
a sudden blast from Apenninus blows,

cold with perpetual snows;
the tender-blighted plant shrinks up its leaves, and

dies.

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