Pueblo Indian Agriculture

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UNM Press, 2005 - 363페이지
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The practice of irrigational agriculture has always set the Pueblo Indians apart from other native groups on the New Mexican frontier. For centuries, farming has been the foundation of the economy of all nineteen Pueblo Indian groups and their ancestors. It led to their theocratic system of government to control water and land use and to a complex ceremonial religion designed to ensure a bountiful harvest.

James Vlasich traces Pueblo agriculture from the Spanish entrada to the twenty-first century. Early explorers marveled at the Puebloans' sophisticated irrigation systems and crop production. Their agricultural practices represented industry, stability, prosperity, and technology. As the population of the Rio Grande Valley increased, cultures, that had admired Pueblo agricultural knowledge began to challenge the Puebloans' right to the land and water. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the American government sought to modernize the agricultural programs, a quest doomed to failure until the Great Depression, followed by World War II, allowed for change.

In spite of increased availability of other economic venues, among them casino gambling, the tenacious character of the Pueblo people has kept agriculture central to their culture.

 

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목차

Chapter One
11
Chapter Two
37
Chapter Three
61
Chapter Four
89
Chapter Five
125
Chapter Six
159
Chapter Seven
187
Chapter Eight
209
Chapter Nine
243
Chapter TEN
279
NOTES
295
Bibliography
337
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저자 정보 (2005)

James A. Vlasich is professor of history, Southern Utah University, Cedar City, Utah.

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