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SYLVAN LAKE little play upon the fears of our friend. We ex- but an orthodox Syntax will indignantly scorn this erted ourself successfully to overturn a number vulgar mode of locomotion, and bless the man who of the largest stones around us, and then, joy- first invented boots. A few minutes' walk will fully announcing the success of our search, we bring you to the margin of the Upper or Sylvan pointed with an affected shudder to the freshly Lake, a view of which we add to the list of our picdisturbed rocks. B— turned pale with fright, torial memories. You may pass an hour or two deand grasping us by the arm literally pulled us lightfully in strolling upon the pleasant shores, or along the path. We intimated to him, pointing you may enter one of the skiffs which skim the to our sketch-box, that with such a load it would waters, and mingle your voice in happy carol with be impossible for us to proceed so fast. Taking the murmur of the breeze, which never fails to the hint, he added our burden to his own, and thus play with the bright image cast by tree and rock relieved us to the end of the journey. When he and sail on the pellucid bosom of the lake. When came to a “realizing sense" of the nature of the these more demonstrative expressions of pleasure, ruse played upon him, which we very triumph- which the scene will always draw from the coldantly laid bare to his imagination, he vowed never est hearts, are spent, you may give your thoughts again, under any circumstances whatever, to carry to the poetic page, or to the dreams of the roour box, and at the same time condemned us to mancer, occasionally glancing at the fly which a fine of a pitcher of the very best milk-punch you have cast upon the water to lure the wary which the borough of Palenville (our head-quar- trout. In short, unless you can find here some ters at the time) would afford.

or other source of pleasure, God pity you, unOn the opposite side of the hotel is another happy man! grand look-out which visitors delight in, under The footpath to the Falls is another and much the programme of a jaunt to the South Mountain. shorter one than the carriage way. It leaves the It overlooks the clove of the Kauterskill, the finest lakes to the right and traverses the forest. We chapter of the Catskill scenery, and which we did it for the first time by moonlight, after lingershall read con amore, when we have sufficiently ing too long in the shadows of the ravines below. glanced at the Mountain House localities. The density of the leafage made the way very

The next pilgrimage which the tourist is ex- sombre. Late rains had left innumerable pools pected to make is to the two charming lakelets, here and there, and our foot often sank into their which, in their strange mountain bed, add so treacherous depths, when we thought we were greatly to the interest of the surrounding points. firmly stepping upon inviting bits of polished Their waters supply the renowned Catskill Falls, rock. Now we nearly lost our equilibrium, as which we shall reach in due order. An easy like a drunken man we made a lofty step over wagon passes the lakes at intervals throughout some nothing, which, in the partial obscurity, apthe day, on its way from the hotel to the cascades, peared to be a considerable obstruction in the

path. Now a dripping bough cooled our per- | pleasant sort of café, where you may strengthen spiring phiz with its saucy greetings, and then your physical man with any species of refreshour thoughtless heel crushed the head of some ment, from brandy-punch (in the quality of which unsuspecting reptile. It was a lonely walk, and you may place the extremest confidence of true despite our romance, we were not a little relieved love) to a cooling ice-cream or a draught of when we emerged from the wilderness upon the sparkling lemonade. At the same time you may larger path which leads over the plain of the relieve yourself still further by lightening your * Pine Orchard” to the Mountain House. The purse to the extent of a quarter, which the plasight of that beautiful structure, in its wild insu- cards posted around will instruct you it is ex. lation, and with its many illumined windows, ob pected that gentlemen will pay to keep the stairs, scured only by the passings and repassings of the Falls, and the guides, in order. This assessgentle forms, was as grateful to our eye as was ment also rewards the Neptune of the spot-our the sound of the distant music to our ear. venerated friend Peter Schutt, whom you must

Now for the Falls. Approaching from the cultivate—for “ letting off the water !” For, be Mountain House, you of course see them first it known unto you, that a dam is built above from above. Before you commence the descent these Falls ; by which ingenious means the stream, of the long flights of wooden steps which lead restrained from wasting its sweetness on the desto the base of the cataracts, you enter a very ert air, is peddled out, wholesale and retail, at

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THE HIGH FALLS.

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the tale of two and a half dimes a splash! Cooper to shelf, first running this way and that way, says, in the “ Pioneer,' touching these cascades: striving to get out of the hollow, till it finally gets " The stream is, may be, such an one as would to the plain.” turn a mill, if so useless a thing was wanted in When you reach the base of the first Fall, your the wilderness; but the hand that made that guide will perhaps conduct you over a narrow * leap' never made a mill!" Alas! since Coo- ledge behind the falling torrent, as at “ Terminaper's hero lived, the “wilderness" has “ blossomed tion Rock” at Niagara. Then reaching the green as the rose," and the once free torrent is now sward on the opposite side of the stream, you may chained by the cold shackles of the spirit of gain. make a signal to Peter Schutt, who will be lookHappily, after being thus bound, it laughs with ing over the piazza of his café above, and if you the greater glee when released; and one will for- have duly settled between you the telegraphic alget while he gazes, spell-bound, upon the world phabet, in such case made and provided, he will of spray, that, like the sunshine in his own heart, attach a basket to the projecting pole, and inconit will not always last. To continue our loan from tinently there will descend sundry bottles of the the graphic picture in the Pioneer: “The water very coolest Champagne of which the vineyards comes croaking and winding among the rocks, of France ever dreamed. You may then repose first so slow that a trout might swim in it, and yourself half an hour or more upon the mossy then starting and running, like any creature that couch aforesaid, imbibe Neptune's nectar, and wanted to make a fair spring, till it gets to where when your quarter's worth of cascade is spent, the mountain divides like the cleft foot of a deer, you may remount the steps to the summit of the leaving a deep hollow for the brook to tumble Fall, or may accompany us and the stream down into. The first pitch is nigh two hundred feet; the ravine to the great clove below. One moment, and the water looks like flakes of snow before it though, before we tumble through brush and brake, touches the bottom, and then gathers itself to- and over rock and rapid. On one occasion, while gether again for a new start: and, may be, flut- we were sketching the beauties of certain other ters over fifty feet of flat rock, before it falls for cascades in the neighborhood called Little Falls, another hundred feet, when it jumps from shelf we were discovered by Peter Schutt, who accused

us bitterly of forgetting our first love, and strictly and small farms. The situation of Palenville, * forbade us, or any body, to “pairt the Little Falls at the portals of the hills, gives you an equal and bigger than his !" Peter Schutt can bear no rivalready access to the great valley on one side, and near the throne.

to the mountain solitudes on the other. EastThe passage of the gorge we now traverse is ward from the hamlet, half a mile is a most lovable replete with interest. Up and down we go for a cascade, too much neglected by the few travelers varied mile, urging our way through the deep who come to the clove. A minute's walk through tangled wild wood, leaping from rock to rock a dense copse will bring you to an unexception across the brawling stream, contesting the track able point of observation. Seated upon a mosswith prostrate trees, gazing reverently upward grown rock, and shaded by the “ sloping eaves" upon sullen cliffs, or far below into the deep of giant hemlocks, you “muse on flood and fell." chasms where the plunging waters lie inert for a At your feet lies the deep basin of dark waters, moment after their unwonted toil. At the close the clustering foliage toying with their busy bubof this brief but brilliant episode in our tour, we bles. The cascade and its accompanying rockopen upon the fine turnpike road which crosses ledges fills the middle ground, exposing beyond the mountains through the clove of the Kauters- the entire stretch of the southern line of hill, until kill. We shall perhaps explore this picturesque it is lost in the golden haze of the setting sun. gorge more intelligently if we commence the jaunt At this evening hour, too, the sunlight kisses only at the mouth of the passage, where one or other the tops of the trees and shrubs, and glimmers of the little inns of Palenville will afford us a very upon the upper edge alone of the falling water. tolerable if not luxurious bivouac.

A little way below and this picture occurs again, Very few of the thousands who annually visit in a scarcely less pleasing form. Still further the Mountain House ever explore this, the most eastward are other smaller yet exceedingly agreecharming part of the Catskills. The village of able glimpses of cascade and copse. The greater Palenville, apart from its location, is a hamlet of beauties, however, lie west of the village, and the most shabby sort. It barely supports one ill- along the bed of the torrent, rather than on the furnished store, two primitive way-side taverns, a frequented path. You must make a thousand Methodist chapel, a school, a post-office, and a détours to properly explore the varying course of small woolen factory. With the exception of such the brook which dashes and leaps through this gentry as the blacksmith, the wagon-maker, the magnificent pass. You must risk your neck now cobbler, and the tailor, the inhabitants employ and then in descending to the arcana of a ghostly themselves in the factory, in neighboring saw-glen far below the roadside, and anon you must mills, tanneries, and in the transportation of lum- struggle manfully to pull your aching limbs back ber and leather to the river landings. In the again. After the passage of a mile and a half vicinity are a few of the better class of homesteads you cross the creek on a wooden bridge, rickety

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THE HIGH ROCKS. and insecure enough for all the requisitions of the and unusual noise. Remembering that the much picturesque, at the favorite point of “High Rocks." dreaded snake moves more silently, we ascribed Beneath this bridge is a fall of great extent and the fracas to the passage of stray cattle, or to beauty. To see it to advantage, you must hunt the noisy amours of the winds, and resumed our up the footpath, which will lead you to the edge meditations. Again were we startled, and this of the water on the opposite bank, where a good time, with a consciousness of some extraordinary granite lounge looks the roystering spray full in presence ; when looking up, we caught the wonthe face.

dering eye of a remarkable old denizen of PalenBeyond this point the highway offers very lit- ville, and heard him ejaculate, as he stared at our tle of interest, excepting in the general vistas of picture, “ 'Tis most onaccountable !” This is a the ravine, up and down, as you ascend the ridge. favorite expression of the good old man's. The waters may, however, still be followed two “Is that you, Uncle Joe!” we exclaimed, much or three hundred yards, to the base of another relieved, "we took you for a bear!” fall, not less noticeable, though of totally opposite “O no !” said he, “there ain't many bears in character to that which you have just left. This these parts now, and they never disturb a body. is known to all habitués of the clove as the Dog- When they hear a man coming, they always bear Hole. It is a perpendicular leap of some sixty away! he, he, he! 'Tis most onaccountable !" feet. The stream here, extremely narrowed by Uncle Joe looks out and observes the clouds the rocky banks, rushes over an immense concave gathering or rolling away, and each circumstance ledge, into a caldron from which a fish could strikes him as most unaccountable ; in the long scarcely emerge.

winter evenings he loses at dominoes in the sitWe were once passing the day here sketching; ting-room of the village inn, and in his peculiar undisturbed, save by the music of the waters, and nasal utterance still thinks it “most onaccountthe melody of birds ; when, as we finished our able !" He once undertook to pilot us over a drawing and were examining it with inward sat- short cut to the Mountain House, when he comisfaction, we were suddenly startled by a near pletely lost his way, yet found every consolation

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