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lation, we here find selections from modern writers, | favorite with the author. As a general, he comwho, though less celebrated, show that poetic in- mands his warmest admiration. From his first to spiration is by no means extinct in the German Fa- his last battle, he can not discover an error of judgtherland. Among these, are several of the recentment or failure of execution. Even his imperfecchampions of European freedom, whose fiery strains tions as a man have a strange fascination. The still echo with the excitements of revolution. For extraordinary influence which he possessed over the most part, the translations are executed with all with whom he came in contact, was owing in spirit and fidelity, preserving the metre of the orig. a great degree to his unusual dignity of deportment, inal in every instance, and usually reproducing the his singular personal beauty, his brilliant conversa. thought with literal exactness. A minute verbal / tional talents, and his winning suavity of address. criticism could doubtless discover many imperfec. Still, the author discusses the defects of his hero tions in the version, but it would be ungracious to with great impartiality, and, in some points of view, dwell on errors in a work which, as a whole, presents a less favorable estimate of his character bears the marks of conscientious care and literary than that given by Dr. Arnold. In the composition of accomplishment. The original text is presented on this volume we find numerous passages ofuncommon the page opposite the translation, furnishing an al- splendor of diction, and showing almost unequaled most resistless temptation to the German scholar to powers of scenic description. As a whole, however, look out for discrepancies.

we do not think it comes up to the average standard One of Ticknor and Fields's most interesting re of Mr. Herbert's productions. There are frequent prints is Mrs. Newton CROSLAND's recent work, instances of careless writing, occasional repetitions, entitled Memorable Women---the Story of their Lives, and sometimes a train of thought is suggested rather including biographical sketches of Lady Russell, than developed. The volume is also disfigured Madame D'Arblay and Mrs. Piozzi, Mary L. Ware, with numerous typographical errors. Mrs. Hutchinson and Lady Fanshawe, Margaret Life's Lesson is the title of a domestic story, Fuller, and Lady Sale. The prominent incidents in abounding in natural sketches of character, and frethe lives of these “memorable women" are repro- quent pathetic and touching scenes. The plot duced from authentic sources, and placed in a light shifts often to different and distant localities, affordadapted to awaken an interest in the highest traits ing scope to the writer for portraitures of a great of their character. Mrs. Crosland writes with live variety of social phases. In some instances the liness and charming simplicity. Her narrative is characters are copied from famous originals, and the enlivened with true womanly sympathies, although fidelity of their representation will be easily recogshe makes no attempt to give a false brilliancy to nized. The volume is recommended by its air of the virtues of her favorites. One of the most agree-reality, its excellent moral tone, and the flowing able papers in the volume is that devoted to Ma- case of its language. (Published by Harper and dame D'Arblay and Mrs. Piozzi. Apart from its Brothers.) happy sketches of character, it is filled with illus- ' A Complete Treatise on Artificial Fish Breeding, trations of the literary society of that period, and edited by W. H. Fry, comprises the substance of abounds with amusing anecdote. The author has the reports on the subject made to the French Acaddone justice to the memory of our countrywomen, emy and the French Government, with particulars Mrs. Ware and Margaret Fuller. She cherishes a of the discovery as pursued in England. The arloving appreciation of the quiet disinterestedness tificial mode of multiplying fish in illimitable numand rare feminine wisdom of the one, while she bers, it appears, was found out in Germany nearly does not lose sight of the strong affections and he a century ago, but has been lost sight of until reroic spirit of self-sacrifice of the other, in admira-cently, when it has attracted the attention both of tion of her bright and sometimes dazzling intellectual practical and scientific men. An appropriation was gifts. The purpose of the volume is “to set before made for its encouragement by the French Governthe young women of the present day examples of ment in 1852, and the result has been of a quite wives and mothers who have done their duty under satisfactory nature. In the first six months of its difficulties and temptations," rather than to “en-operation the superintendents of the establishment courage a liking for individual and isolated in- had artificially fecundated 3,302,000 eggs, and prostances" of exceptional adventure. We think the duced 1,683,200 living fish, of which 600,000 were author has successfully accomplished her design, trout and salmon. The present volume sets forth and produced a work equally excellent in its tend all the details of this curious discovery, and exencies and delightful in its spirit.

plains the methods by which, "at little care and The Captains of the Roman Republic, by Henry little cost, barren or impoverished streams may be WILLIAM HERBERT. (Published by Charles Scrib. stocked to an unlimited extent with the rarest and ner.) Commencing with Scipio Africanus, and most valuable breeds of fish, from eggs artificially closing with Julius Cæsar, this volume celebrates | procured, impregnated, and hatched.” (Published the great Roman commanders whose names are by D. Appleton and Co.) identified with military glory. Mr. Herbert sum- The Virginia Comedians, edited from the MSS. marily disposes of the claims of the Camilli, the of C. EFFINGHAM, Esq. (published by D. Appleton Curii, and the Decii, as belonging to the world of and Co.), betrays the pen of a gifted writer who has romance rather than of authentic history, and main- already laid his native State under obligations by tains that Scipio, the conqueror of Hannibal, was his life-like illustrations of her history, in the garb the first Roman who is entitled to the name of an of attractive fictions. The volumes before us poreminent Captain. The subjugation of Italy to the tray the state of society in Virginia during the pearms of Rome was not due to the individual sci. riod immediately prior to the Revolution--the char. ence and prowess of her generals, but to the ex. acters of the plot are entirely taken from authentic traordinary constitution and peculiar organization tradition and are made to contribute to a piquant of her people. Prior to the conqueror of Zama, no and often highly-amusing story. Entirely at home single man displayed such remarkable qualities as among the scenes which he describes--glowing with to authorize his pretensions to the praise of decided a filial affection towards Old Virginia--combining military genius. In every respect, Scipio is a prime the tastes of an antiquary with the temper of a humorist—and possessing a fine instinct for the vari- I thought and sentiment concealed in the poetry of eties of character-the author has wrought up the Spenser, for the enjoyment of our excited and busy materials at his command into a narrative no less age. With a profound and tender admiration for remarkable for its vigor of description than its dra- the great allegorical bard, the editor would fain matic effect. With his former productions—which make his glorious and ennobling ideas familiar to have found such a favorable reception from the pub the appreciation of men and women among his lic—this story fills a peculiar place in our native contemporaries. In carrying out this plan, he has literature, and legitimates the claim of its anony- presented the thoughts of the poet, partly in prose, mous writer to original talent.

in the language of the editor, and partly by extracts, Birds of the Bible, by the Rev. H. HARBAUGH. in the language of the author, with the spelling in (Published by Lindsay and Blakiston.) In this some degree modernized. Although we do not supelegantly illustrated volume we have one of the pose that the subtle and delicate conceptions of earliest gift-books of the season, and one well-Spenser will gain any sudden accession of popularadapted to the gratification of the religious circle. ity by this effort of an admirer, we none the less It consists of a series of animated descriptions of welcome it as a devout homage to poetical genius, the various birds alluded to in Sacred Writ, with betraying a sincere sympathy with the highest spirselections of poetry appropriate to the respective itual beauty, and an enviable skill in its illustrasubjects. The engravings which accompany the tion. letter-press are in a high style of excellence; and, Later Years is the title of a new work by the autogether with the beautiful typography of the vol. thorof “The Old House by the River." It is disume, make it a tasteful ornament for the drawing-tinguished by the same sweetness and pathos of room table, as well as a valuable addition to the sentiment, the same picturesqueness and vigor of library.

description, and the same graceful flow of diction, E. H. Butler and Co. have issued a new and en- which have won such a flattering welcome to the larged edition of Professor Hart's Female Prose former productions of the author. He has made his Writers of America, containing brief sketches of place good among our most natural and forcible their biography, and selections from their works. writers on rural scenes, and the present work will The volume is brought out in a style of sumptuous enhance his enviable reputation. Though selecting beauty, and is embellished with portraits of several prose as his medium for expression, he has the eye of the celebrated women whose writings from a por. and the heart of a poet, and his words will always tion of its contents. In his biographical notices, find an echo among readers of a poetical temperaProfessor Hart has, perhaps, erred by an excessivement. (Published by Harper and Brothers.) brevity; but he is uniformly kind and gallant to his Synonyms of the New Testament, by RICHARD fair subjects-preserving as great a degree of im. Chenevix TRENCH. (Published by Redfield.) partiality as could be expected of frail mortals This volume, by one of the most acute and ingenwhere living characters are the theme. The speci- ious word-critics, occupies a place which has hithmens which he has given of their writings are fa- erto been left almost entirely vacant in sacred phivorable to the character of female literature in this lology. Without claiming to exhaust the subject, country. They present a singular variety of taste it discusses several of the most important synonyms and talent, and certainly can not in every instance of the New Testament, and points out their analo. claim the highest rank ; but they all show an admir-gies and differences with sagacity and force. The able cultivation, great purity of sentiment, rare fa- volume forms a valuable addition to the apparatus cility and gracefulness of expression, and not un- of the Biblical student. frequently the marks oforiginal and vigorous thought. Empirical Psychology; or, the Human Mind as They do not appear to imitate any foreign model ; Given in Consciousness, by LAURENS P. HICKOK, nor are there often any traces of imitating one an- | D.D. (Published by G. Y. Van De Bogert.) The other. Most of the pieces are marked by a certain former work of the author on Rational Psychology air of spontaneity-showing that they had their ori. has established his reputation as a profound and gin in a genuine inward impulse, rather than in any sharp-sighted metaphysician. In some sense, the compulsion of circumstances. Doubtless the influ- present volume may be regarded as a sequel to that ence of our free institutions is friendly to the devel. important production. Leaving out of view the opment and exercise of womanly genius. The primary, absolute conditions of all Intelligence, in universal spread of education calls out intellectual its subjective idea and its objective law, it deals force wherever it exists; while the prevailing equal. I only with the facts of experience as brought to light ity of social position gives ample scope for its un- in the common consciousness of humanity. It fettered action. Hence, though perhaps no Ameri- makes no claims to the prerogatives of an exact can authoress has attained the eminence of a De science, and prefers to be deemed less a psychology, Staël, a Somerville, a Browning, the catalogue of ihan a description of the human mind. Still, the female writers in this country presents a variety author has endeavored to group and harmonize the and uniform excellence of which no other literature | facts with which he deals in an integral unity; and, can boast.

in this point of view, demands for his system an Ida Norman (published by Sheldon, Lamport, and cqual place in science, to say the least, to that held Blakeman), is the title of an original novel by Mrs. by chemistry, geology, and botany. His work is Lincoln Phelps, depicting the varied fortunes of intended as a preparation for the study of metaa heroine, from the days of school-girl prosperity, physics in more advanced stages of philosophical through numerous reverses and trials, to a happy inquiry, and is written in a manner to be compredenouement. The plot is a hackneyed one, and is in hended by intelligent students, with an ordinary cumbered with too great a multiplicity of incidents, gift of introspection, enabling them to fall back on but it conveys a wholesome moral, and is developed the actual data of consciousness on which the whole with considerable ability.

method of the author is founded. The peculiar Spenser and the Fairy Queen, by JOHN S. Hart, merit of the volume is its clear recognition of the LL.D. (Published by Hayes and Zell.) The de- world of consciousness, irrespective of the sphere sign of this volume is to open the treasures of of sensuous observation. It presents the interior facts of human experience in a clear and convincing | in action! His passion for the ideal may often lead light. At times, the language is too technical for him to give a too brilliant coloring to the virtues of the novice in psychological inquiries; but, as a his favorites, and to throw a too sombre hue around general rule, a lucid expression is given to definite the lives of those whose base and vulgar qualities conceptions. Several of the topics treated of are call forth his detestation. He must be read with subjected to a vigorous and powerful analysis, and the allowance that is always due to the statements the results set forth in the transparent medium of of excitable and impassioned writers. The silver apt and original illustrations. In the devotion to vail of ideality, which he casts around his figures, material studies and pursuits—which is just now may blind the eye of the spectator to their true so much the order of the day-the rare merits of this features. But the tinge of romance, in which he treatise may perhaps fail of due appreciation; but delights, gives a charm to his pages as æsthetic no competent judge can give it a thorough examin-compositions. We linger over his radiant pictures ation, without being deeply impressed with the ex- with such fond admiration, that we do not care to ceeding value of its instructions, and the uncommon scrutinize their fidelity with too curious an eye. didactic accomplishments of its author.

The volumes now published exhibit the character. A new volume of Poems, by THOMAS WILLIAM istic traits of their author in strong relief. A series Parsons (published by Ticknor and Fields), is one of vivid portraitures, they exercise a resistless spell of the most noteworthy productions of the month, over the beholder, who is satiated with their enon account of the severe classical form of its com- chantments, and is not tempted to question their position, and its utter freedom from the melo-dra- truthfulness. matic vagaries which have been so absurdly affected An Address before the Louisville Horticultural Soby many popular modern poets. It is strongly ciety, by Dr. T. S. BELL, is an eloquent and finished marked by terseness of language and energy of performance, descanting on the attractions of flowers thought. The prevailing severity of its tone is hap-| and fruits with the taste of an amateur and the pily relieved by specimens of brilliant humor, and knowledge of a scientific botanist. Such discourses occasional passages of pathetic tenderness. With are among the few productions of the day which renone of the transient glare which allures a swarm mind us of the glow and freshness of the Garden of of superficial readers, the strong, sinewy qualities Eden. of this poetry are a pledge of the permanent esteem Sermons for the People, by T. H. STOCKTON. in which it will be held by the lovers of healthy and The modest announcement of this volume will masculine literature.

hardly prepare the reader, accustomed to sounding The Life and Epistles of the Apostle Paul, by the book-titles, to appreciate the extraordinary merit Rev. W. J. CONYBEARE and the Rev. J. S. How which its pages contain. Its author has long been son, is issued by Charles Scribner, in two large known as one of the first of living pulpit orators. octavo volumes, and will doubtless be regarded by All his life a severe sufferer from ill-health, he has the religious public in general, no less than by the had but limited opportunities of filling that space beological students, as an acquisition of almost ines-fore the public eye which his powers qualified him timable value. The high reputation of this work in to occupy. The present work can scarcely be reGreat Britain makes any comment on its merits su- garded as more than an indication of the richlyperfluous, and we need only announce to our readers cultivated mind which it represents, but it will be the appearance of a publication illustrative of an im- cordially welcomed as a most interesting and eloportant portion of the Scriptures, in which they may quent contribution to the literature of the pulpit. be sure of not experiencing any disappointment. Sound in doctrine-able in exposition-fruitful in

Jerusalem and its Vicinity, by W.H. ODENHEIMER suggestive hints-picturesque in style, whenever (published by E. H, Butler and Co., Philadelphia), the topic in hand admits—and with a wider and is an elegant Christmas offering, composed of a se- more tasteful selection of natural images than the ries of lectures delivered in St. Peter's Church genius of the ministry gathers from landscape and during Passion Week, and illustrating the most firmament, it is altogether one of the most varied, important scenes and localities of the Holy City. charming, and instructive volumes ever offered to They combine description, instruction, and religious the Christian intellect of any land. (Published by counsels in an impressive manner, and are admir- | English and Company, Pittsburgh.) ably adapted to awaken pious associations with the interesting places which they portray. In point of Mr. B. J. LOSSING, the well-known author of typographical execution and pictorial embellish. the Pictorial Field Book of the Revolution, has ment, the volume will bear comparison with the formed an association with Mr. LYMAN C. Dramost beautiful editions of a similar character, and per, the Secretary of the Wisconsin Historical can not fail to gratisy a refined taste.

Society, for the purpose of preparing a series of Memoirs of Celebrated Characters, by ALPHONSE popular volumes, to be illustrated in the highest DE LAMARTINE. (Published by Harper and Broth- style of the art of wood engraving, descriptive of ers.) Among the celebrated characters of whom the history and biography of the Great West. sketches are given in these volumes, are Nelson, They will embrace the lives of Boone, Clark, SieHeloise, Columbus, Palissy the Potter, Cicero, ver, Robertson, Kenton, Crawford, Brady, Wetzel, Homer, Joan of Arc, Fenelon, and others of no less Lewis, Shelby, the Campbells, and other pioneers wide a diversity of position, fortunes, and age. They who settled the Western Valleys. They will comappear to have been culled, without any very obvi- mence the preparation of the series, and produce ous principle of selection, from the universal mass the volumes as rapidly as possible, after Mr. Losof biographical records ; but, in every instance, they sing shall have completed his elaborate and fully furnish apt materials to the author's plastic imag- illustrated History of the War of 1812-15, now in ination, and prolific pen. What a versatility of hand, and for which he has obtained much valuable taste and talent, to be sure, does he exhibit! How original material from Mr. Draper's Western Col. quickly is he kindled by the contemplation of every lection. In the mean while a Life of Daniel Boone form of beauty! What glowing sympathies with all will be completed and issued, probably at the close that is noble in character, lofty in genius, or heroic of autumn or early in the ensuing winter.

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CHILDHOOD.

YOUTH

YOUTH.

MANHOOD.

MANHOOD

TWO PATIIS IN LIFE. THESE contrasted pictures furInish texts for a whole volume of sermons upon human life and destiny. The Child stands at the parting of the ways, and he may run through in succession all the phases depicted in either series of portraits. The essential elements ofeither course of development lie alike in those smooth features. Which shall be actually realized depends mainly upon the influences brought to bear upon him from without. A few years of training in our schools upon the one hand, or in the streets upon the other, will make all the difference, in the YOUTH, between the characters that stand opposed to each other in these opposite pictures. A youth of study and training in a few years moulds the lineaments of the face into the resem. blance of the first picture of ManHOOD; while, by a law equally inevitable, idleness and dissipation bring out all the lower animal faculties, which reveal themselves in the depressed forehead, the hard eyebrow, the coarse mouth, and the thickened neck of the opposite picture. The short-boy, and rowdy, and blackleg, if he escapes the state prison and the gallows, passes, as he reaches the confines of MIDDLE AGE, into the drunken loafer, sneaking around the grogshop in the chance of securing a treat from some one who knew him in his flush days; while he who has chosen the other path, as he passes the “mid journey of life," and slowly descends the slope toward Age, grows daily richer in the love and esteem of those around him ; and in the bosom of the family that gather about his hearth, lives over again his happy youth and earnest manhood. What a different picture is presented in the fate of him who has chosen the returnless downward path, another and almost the last stage of which is portrayed in the companion sketch of Age. The shadows deepen as he de. scends the hill of life. He has been successively useless, a pest, and a burden to society, and when he dies there is not a soul to wish that his life had been prolonged, Two lives like these lie in possibility enfolded within every infant born into the world,

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MIDDLE LIFE.

MIDDLE LIFE.

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AGE,

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