Thoughts on Civil Liberty, on Licentiousness and Faction

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J. White and T. Saint, 1765 - 167페이지
 

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102 페이지 - Some men there are, the pests of society I think them, who pretend a great regard to religion in general, but who take every opportunity of declaiming publicly against that system of religion, or at least against that church-establishment, which is received in Britain.
46 페이지 - In what manner the security of civil liberty is to be effected by means of this Code of Education, may be seen in the following description he gives of the institutions of Sparta: "No father had a right to educate his children according to the caprice of his own fancy. They were delivered to public officers, who initiated them early in the manners, the maxims, the exercises, the toils ; in a word, in all the mental and bodily acquirements and habits which corresponded with the genius of the state....
106 페이지 - For the biihops, being appointed by the patrons of liberty, have been fuch as held principles confident with the freedom of the Hate: and much caution having been required of them, and ufed by them, in the appointments of...
103 페이지 - Hope s of the Virtuous. Such, then, hath been the Progrefs of this public Evil; which hath proceeded almoft without Cognizance from the Magiftrate : Inftead of That, it is well known, that fome of thefe public Enemies of their Country and Mankind were formerly penlioned, and others privately encouraged by Thofe in Power.
95 페이지 - Would to God thefe intentional friends of public liberty had been as much the friends of private virtue and religion ! they would not then have undermined the foundations, while they were building the fuperftrufture, of civil freedom.
83 페이지 - It is deeply to be regretted," he observes in one passage, " that the British system of policy and religion is not upheld in its native power, like that of Sparta, by correspondent and effectual rules of education ; that it is in the power of every private man to educate his child, not only without a reverence for these, but in absolute contempt of them...
96 페이지 - Tracts of lefs Note, feem palpable Inftances of this Truth : The one was written in Defence of civil, the other of religious Liberty. Yet both tended, in their general Tour, to relax thofe Principles by which alone Freedom, either civil or religious, can be fuftained : By their intemperate Infults on religious Inftitutions ; by their public and * See the Div. Leg. of Mofes. Dedication, Vol. ii. p. 6, &c. F...
99 페이지 - Nature ; as being fufficient of itfelf to eftablim the unerring Practice of Virtue, unlefs beforehand fophifticated by fervile Inftitutions. The noble Writer, indeed, attempts a Vindication of this licentious Conduct, by an Appeal to the Practice of ancient GREECE and ROME. There, he tells us, " Philofophy had a free Gourfe, and was " permitted as a Balance againft Super
46 페이지 - to educate his children according to the " caprice of his own fancy. They were " delivered to public officers, who initiated " them early in the manners, the maxims, " the exercifes, the toils ; in a word, in all *' the mental and bodily acquirements and " habits which correfponded with the genius
100 페이지 - I am perfwaded, the noble Author would have looked grave, had he been put in Mind of the Remark which FABRICIUS made on the Epicurean Seel, " that he wifhed Juch Principles to *

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