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HEENAN AND SAYERS.-Continued.

THE TRUE LOVERS' DISCUSSION. But then the thirty-seventh round came on to be the last, The Briton's friends they plainly saw their man was failing fast; Oxe pleasant evening, as pinks and daisies

Closed in their bosoms a drop of dew, When Heenan gave him another blow, which made them feel

The feathered warblers of every species, forlorn

Together chanted their notes so true. The Briton's friends jumped in the ring and said the fight was

As I did stray, wrapped in meditation, drawn.

It charmed my heart to hear them sing;

The silent orbs of night were just arising, But Ileenan called on Sayers again to come and fight it out,

And the air in concert did sweetly sing. But he was so badly punished he could scarcely open his mouth; With joy transported, each sight I courted; Heenan said: The fight is mine--and stood upon his ground

Whilst gazing 'round with inspective eye, Saying: I am the champion of the world, in the thirty-seventh Two youthful lovers, in conversation round.

Closely engaged, I chanced to spy;
Those couple spoke with such force of reason,

Their sentiments they expressed so clear,
THE VIRGIN MARY'S BANK.

And just to listen to their conversation,

My inclination was to draw near. The evening star rose beauteous above the fading day, As to the lone and silent beach the Virgin came to pray, He pressed her hand and said: “My darling, And hill and wave shone brightly in the moonlight's mellow fall; Tell me the reason you changed your mind; But the bank of green where Vary knelt was brightest of them or have I loved you to be degraded,

Tho' youth and innocence are in their

prime?

For I am slighted and ill requited Slow moving o'er the waters, a gallant bark appeared,

For all the favors I did bestow; And her joyous crew look'd from the deck as to the land she You'll surely tell me before I leave you, near'd;

Why you're inclined now to treat me so.” To the calm and shelter'd haven she floated like a swan, And her wings of snow o'er the waves below in pride and beauty With great acuteness she made him answer, shone.

Saying: “On your favors I would rely, But you might contrive to blast my glory,

And our marriage day you might hover by. The master saw our Lady as he stood upon the prow;

Young men, in general, are fickle-minded, And marked the whiteness of her robe—the radiance of her brow; And to trust you I am afraid ; Her arms were folded gracefully upon her stainless breast, If for your favors I am indebter, And her eyes look’d up among the stars to Him her soul lov'u Both stock and interest you shall be paid.” best.

“ To blast your glory, love, I ne'er intended,

Nor tickle-minded will I ever be; lle showed her to his sailors, and he hail'd her with a cheer, As for my debts, you can never pay them And on the kneeling Virgin they gazed with laughter and jeer; But by true love and loyalty. And madly swore, a form so fair, they never saw before; Remember, darling, our first engagement, And they curs’d the faint and lagging breeze that kept them When childish pastime was all we knew; from the shore.

Be true and constant-I'm thine forever

I'll brave all dangers and go with you.” The ocean from its bosom shook off the moonlight sheen, “ Your proffer's good, sir, I thank you for it, And up its wrathful billows rose to vindicate their Queen;

But yet your offers I can't receive; And a cloud came o'er the heavens, and a darkness o'er the land, By soft persuasion and kind endearment And the scofling crew beheld no inore that Lady on the strand. The wily serpent beguiled Eve.

There's other reasons might be assigned,

The highest tide love will ebb and fall; Ou burst the pealing thunder, and the lightning leap'd about;

Another female might suit you better, Ind rushing with its watery war, the tempest gave a shout;

Therefore I can't obey your call.” And that vessel from a mountain wave came down with thund'. ring shock;

“Yes, I'll admit the tide in motion And her timbers flew like scatter'd spray on Inchidony's rock. Is always moving from shore to shore,

But still its substance is never changing, Then loud from all that guilty crew one shriek rose wild and I'll sound your fame with all loyal lovers,

Nor never will, till time's no more. high;

To fix their love on whose mind is pure, But the angry surge swept over them, and hush'd their gurgling Where no existence can ever change it, cry;

Nor no physician prescribe a cure.” And down, till chafing from their strife, th' indignant waters lay,

She says: “Young man, to tell you plainly, And with a hoarse exulting tone the tempest pass'd away,

To refrain you I am inclined,
Another young man of birth and fortune

Has gained my favor and changed my mind.
When the calm and purple morning shone out on high Dunmore, My future welfare I have considered,
Full many a mangled corpse was seen on Inchidony's shore; On fickle footing I'll never stand ;
And to this day the fisherman shows where the scoffers sank; Besides, my parents would be offended
And still he calls that hillock green, “ the Virgin Mary's bank.” To see you walking at my right hand."

THE TRUE LOVERS' DISCUSSION.-Continued.

THE LADY OF KNOCK.
“ What had you, darling, when you were born?
What nature gave, love-so had I-

ATTEND, you faithful Christians, give ear to what I say,
Your haughty parents I do disdain them, It's of a glorious miracle occurred the other day;
And poor ill-got riches I do deny.

Where our blessed Virgin did herself to sinners show,
An honest heart, love, is far superior-

In the holy church of Knock, in the county of Mayo.
Your gold and riches will soon decay;
It's naked we came into this world,

A faithful few, to Mary, true, returning home at night,
And much the same we'll go away.”

Upon the chapel wall did view a most transparent light;
They stood amazed and on it gazed, and trembling struck with

fear, “ You falsify when you say you love me,

When to their astonished eyes three statues did appear.
And slight my parents whom I love dear;
I think it's justice, sir, to degrade you,

On the right was blessed St. Joseph, upon his face a smile, If that's the course you mean to steer.

His holy hands uplifted as he meant to bless this isle; By wealth, or feature, or art of nature,

Our blessed Lady's hands were raised in an attitude of prayer, You're not my equal in any line;

And in the right hand of St. John, God's holy word was there.
Since I conjure you, insist no farther,
For to your wishes I'll not incline.”

The faithful few that saw the sight they say, both one and all,
The holy apparition was some distance from the wall;

And on the left side of St. John appeared to view quite plain, “To falsify, love, I do deny it,

An altar, cross, and the instruments by which the Lamb was

slain.
Your imputation is wrong, I swear;
Like Eve, I find you're a real deceiver,
Your heart's as full as your face is fair.

There are hundreds come from far and near our Lady's aid to For the want of riches you vainly slight me,

seek, And my complexion you do disdain; And by her aid the deaf and dumb are made to hear and speak;

And many who were born blind now see the way to go
Our skin may differ, but true affection
In black or white is all the same."

From the holy church of Knock to the county of Mayo.

At the wedding feast of Galilee, our blessed lady said: “Oh! curb your passion, sir!” she did ex. Oh, Son Divine, there is no wine, but water there is instead; claim,

No sooner had she said the words when her aid, Divine,
.“ It was not to quarrel I met you here, The water that was at the feast was turned into wine.
But to discourse you in moderation
And a real intention to make appear.

Oh, blessed St. Joseph and St. John, we call upon your aid, I speak with candor, I will surrender

And Holy Mother of our God, for sinners intercede; To what is proper in every way,

For the wonders that our Saviour did while preaching to His If you submit to fair discussion,

flock, And reason's dictates you will obey." Are done again, through Mary's aid, in the holy church of Knock.

THE ENNISKILLEN DRAGOON. “It's now too late to ask that question,

When you despise me before my friends; A BEAUTIFUL damsel of fame and renown, Lebanon's plains, if you could command them, A gentleman's daughter of fame and renownAre not sufficient to make amends.

As she rode by the barracks, this beautiful maid,
There's not a tree in the Persian forest

She stood in her coach to see the dragoons' parade.
Retains its color, excepting one:
That is the laurel which I will cherish, They were all dressed out like gentlemen's sons,
And always carry in my right hand.” With their bright shining swords and carbine guns,

With their silver-mounted pistols—she observed them full soon,

For to serve as a royal Enniskillen dragoon! “ The blooming laurel you may admire, Because its verdure's always new,

You bright son of Mars, who stands on the right, But there's another, you can't deny it,

Whose armor doth shine like the bright stars of night, Is just as bright in the gardener's view;

Saying: “Willie, dearest Willie, you've listed full soon, It's wisely resting throughout the winter,

Saying: 'The Lord be with you, Enniskillen dragoon! And blooms again when the spring draws

Oh, Flora! dearest Flora! your pardon I crave, The pen of Homer has written its praises,

It's now and forever I must be a slaveIn June and July it does appear."

Your parents they insulted me both morning and noon,

For fear that you'd wed an Enniskillen dragoon."
* You speak exceedingly, but not corrective, “Oh, mind, dearest Willie! oh, mind what you say,

With words supported, your cause is vain; For children are bound their parents to obey;
Had you the tongue of a Syrian Goddess, For when we're leaving Ireland, they will all change their tune,
Your exhortation I would disdain.

Saying: “The Lord be with you, Enniskillen dragoon!
It was your love that I did require,

But since you've placed it on golden store, Fare you well, Enniskillen! fare you well for a while, I'll strike my string and my harp shall mur. And all around the borders of Erin's green isle,

And when the war is over we'll return in full bloom, Farewell, my love, forever more!

And they'll all welcome home the Enniskillen dragoon.

near;

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THE IRISH SPREE.

CHARMING JUDY CALLAGHAN.

'Twas on a windy night

At two o'clock in the morning, An Irish lad so tight,

All wind and weather scorning, At Judy Callaghan's door,

Sitting upon the palings,
His love-tale he did pour,
And this was part of his wailings:-

Only say
You'll be Mrs. Brallaghan,

Don't say nay,
Charming Judy Callaghan!

A FORTNIGHT ago, boys, me and Martin Brallagan,
Timothy McCarty and Darby O'Callagan,
Went for a spree down to Patsy Murphy's restaurant,
And being fond of fun, of course, we took some girls along.
We said to Murphy: Bring us half a gallon in,
Also some whisky for the girls, they're included in;
When he brought it in, we said shove it up to Flaherty,
For he's our boss, and will settle up on Saturday.
Murphy said: No! for he's had quite enough of us,
He strapped us and never got the stuff oi us;
We'd done him brown, but we couldn't do him black again,
So he picked up the drink and was going to take it back again,
When up jumped McCarty, and asked him what he meant by it?
And swore if he did take it back he'd repent of it.
Murphy said: Och! and was going to take the pitcher,
When up jumped O'Callagan, and neatly knocked his snitcher.
He shouted: Murder! Police! and Suicide!
Then to help him, Brallagan rushed up to his side,
Gave him such a kick it nearly knocked his belly in,
Then he called the barman, Patsy Kelly, in;
In came Kelly, and he had a lot of swagger, too,
Brought in a poker and tongs, and daygers, too;
He got a clout that very soon hit him down,
Since that day poor Kelly's never sit down.
Bang went the bottles, and bang went the glasses, too,
We were enjoying it, and so were the lasses, too;
Smash went the windows, and smash went the furniture,
Then on the fire we put it for to burn it, sure;
Then in the bar-room we turned the rum and whisky on,
That's what the boys and girls all got frisky on.
Big John Burk and little Martin Brallagan
Served us a trick, forget we never shall again;
Only because they couldn't get a drop o' gin,
What does they do but goes and calls a copper in;
He got his head split, then we had the laugh at him,
For when he was down we used his own club on him,
lle blew his whistle, when up came a score of them,
Privates, detectives, sergeants, and more of them;
They were no use, for we soon got the best of them;
And when on the ground we danced on every chest of them.
One got away, faith! it's true what I told you,
He brought back with him a regiment of soldiers,
Also a magistrate, because we wouldn't quiet act,
And what does he do, but he goes and reads the riot act.
They seized McCarty, and then little Brallagan,
Then into them went the girls and O'Callagan;
They left sixteen dead upon the floor, they did,
And then I sloped out of the back door, I did.
They have ten warrants out for murder and robbery, I
As for myself they can all go to bobbery,
For I am going away as soon as day is dawning,
I set sail for Australia in the morning.

Oh! list to what I say,

Charms you've got like Venus; Own your love you may,

There's but the wall between us. You lie fast asleep,

Snug in bed and snoring;
Round the house I creep,
Your hard heart imploring.

Only say
You'll have Mr. Brallaghan;

Don't say nay,
Charming Judy Callaghan!

I've got a pig and a sow,

I've got a sty to sleep 'em; A calf and a brindled cow,

And a cabin, too, to keep 'em; Sunday hat and coat,

An old gray mare to ride on;
Saddle and bridle, to boot,
Which you may ride astride on.

Only say
You'll be Mrs. Brallaghan,

Don't say nay,
Charming Judy Callaghan!

I've got an acre of ground;

I've got it set with praties; I've got of 'bacey a pound;

I've got some tea for the ladies; I've got the ring to wed,

Some whisky to make us gaily; I've got a feather bed,

And a handsome new shillelah
You'll have Mr. Brallaghan;

Only say
You'll have Mr. Brallaghan;

Don't say nay,
Charming Judy Callaghan!

THE ROSE OF TRALEE.

The pale moon was rising above the green mountain,

The sun was declining beneath the blue sea,
When I strayed with my love to the pure crystal fountain

That stands in the beautiful vale of Tralee.
She was lovely and fair as the rose in the summer,

Yet 'twas not her beauty alone that won me,
Oh, no, 'twas the truth in her eye ever dawning,

That made me love Mary, the rose of Tralee,

You've got a charming eye,

You've got some spelling and reading; You've got, and so have I.

A taste for genteel breeding; You're rich, and fair, and young,

As everybody's knowing;
You've got a decent tongue
When'er 'tis set agoing

Only say
You'll have Mr. Brallaghan,

Don't say nay,
Charming Judy Callaghan!

The cool shades of ev'ning their mantle was spreading,

And Mary, all smiling, and list’ning to me,
The moon thro’ the valley her pale rays was shedding,
When I won the heart of the rose of Tralee.

Though lovely and fair, etc.

TIM MACARTHY'S DAUGHTER.

CHARMING JUDY CALLAGHAN.--Continued.
For a wife till death

I am willing to take ye!
But och! I waste my breath-

The divil himself can't wake ye. 'Tis just beginning to rain,

So I'll get under cover;
To-morrow I'll come again,
And be your constant lover.

Only say
You'll be Mrs. Brallaghan,

Don't say nay,
Charming Judy Callaghan!

Tim MACARTHY gave a party, invitations he sent out

To two or three dozens of big-headed cousins, To tall and short and thin and stout; Mrs. Tim the room did trim, and candle-greased the floor so

well
That half of the dancers fell down in the lancers

And hurt their-I'm afraid to tell;
How they banged at the door, in they came with a roar-

Oh, souch a teasing, a squeezing and sneezing,
Tim Brannigan walked on the chests of a score;

Oh, 'twas death to tall hats, coats got used up as mats, Till they were in with the struggle and din,

You'd have thought you were out in the yard with the cats.

KILLARNEY.

CHORUS.

By Killarney's lakes and fells,

Em’rald isles and winding bays, Mountain paths and woodland dells,

Mem’ry ever fondly strays. Bounteous nature loves all lands,

Beauty wanders ev'rywhere,
Footprints leave on many strands,

But her home is surely there.
Angels fold their wings and rest
In that Eden of the West;
Beauty's home, Killarney,
Ever fair Killarney.

Oh, 'twas a rare, fine, swell, grand, aristocratic affair,
With dukes and earls and nice young girls, and everybody was

there; Never was seen in the land of the green such a set-out, you can

swear, As the coming of age of Tim Macarthy's daughter.

Innisfallen's ruined shrine
· May suggest a passing sigh,
But man's faith can ne'er decline

Such God's wonders floating by.
Castle Lough and Glenna Bay,

Mountains Tore and Eagle's Nest; Still at Mucross you must pray,

Though the monks are now at rest. Angels wonder not that man There would fain prolong life's span; Beauty's home, Killarney, Ever fair Killarney.

When the girls, all scent and curls, had undergone a few repairs,

They heard a great tustle, Miss Finnerty's bustle The dog had gripped upon the stairs; Captain Foy, the stout old boy, while dancing on the stairs for

joy, Fell through on his “crumpet” and yelled like a trumpet:

" I'm wrecked entirely, ship ahoy!
Then the dancing began, girls all looked for a man;

Oh, such a heat and a treading on feet,
Well, the devil may beat such a dance if he can;

How the ladies did flop, how the corks they did pop;
Winking and blinking and thinking and drinking,
Bedad! you'd have thought that they never would stop.--

CHORUS.

No place else can charm the eye

With such bright and varied tints; Every rock that you pass by,

Verdure broiders or besprints. Virgin there the green grass grows,

Every morn Spring's natal day; Bright-hued berries daff the snows,

Smiling Winter's frown away.
Angels often pausing there,
Doubt if Eden were more fair;
Beauty's home, Killarney,
Ever fair Killarney.

Barney Doolin had been foolin' all the night with Miss Maguire,

When in came young Jerry, her lover from Kerry, And pitched poor Doolin on the fire; In the room some boys with sticks for hours had talked on

politics,
And, hearing the row, said: “ Come on wid ye now,

And we'll teach yez all some fightin' tricks!
Off came coats by the pile, they went at it in style;

Buttons were bursting, shillelahs were thirsting
To crack in a head or, at least, shift a tile;

Every man made his mark, ne'er was seen such a lark, Till some great villain, who didn't want killing,

Extinguished the lights and left all in the dark.-CHORUS.

Music there for echo dwells,

Makes each sound a harmony;
Many voiced the chorus swells,

Till it faints in ecstasy.
With the charmful tints below

Seems the heaven above to vie;
All rich colors that we know

Tinge the cloud wreaths in that sky. Wings of angels so might shine, Glancing back soft light divine; Beauty's home, Killarney, Ever fair Killarney.

All the ladies shrieked with fear, but when the boys their sides

got near, And tenderly placed a right arm 'round each waist, They said: “Isn't the darkness nice? oh, dear!" Something smackd, and tho' each Miss when lights were bro't

soon told us this,
They'd snapped a gold car-ring, yet still I am fearing

The snap was nothing but a kiss;
When the fighting was done, then we did have some fun,

Boys lost their pains, readjusted their brains;
If they'd broken one leg, sure they danced upon one;

Though for weeks they were sore, each man fervently swore, Never, oh, never did any one ever see

Such an afľair as Macarthy's before.-CHORUS.

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