Lionel and Clarissa, by I. Bickerstaff. The toy shop; the king and the miller of Mansfield; Sir John Cockle at court; the blind beggar of Bethnal Green, by R. Dodsley. Barataria, by F. Pilon. Rosina, by Mrs. Brooke

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James Plumptre
F. Hodson, 1812

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346 페이지 - Methinks I hear some of you say, Must a Man afford himself no Leisure? I will tell thee, my friend, what Poor Richard says, Employ thy Time well, if thou meanest to gain Leisure; and, since thou art not sure of a Minute, throw not away an Hour.
344 페이지 - A word to the wise is enough, and many words wont fill a bushel, as Poor Richard says." They joined in desiring him to speak his mind, and gathering round him, he proceeded as follows; "Friends," says he, and neighbours, "the taxes are indeed very heavy, and if those laid on by the Government were the only ones we had to pay, we might more easily discharge them; but we have many others, and much more grievous to some of us. We are taxed twice as much by our idleness, three times as much by our pride,...
350 페이지 - And again, Pride is as loud a beggar as want, and a great deal more saucy. When you have bought one fine thing, you must buy ten more, that your appearance may be all of a piece; but Poor Dick says, 'Tis easier to suppress the first desire than to satisfy all that follow it.
351 페이지 - The day comes round before you are aware, and the demand is made before you are prepared to satisfy it; or, if you bear your debt in mind, the term, which at first seemed so long, will, as it lessens, appear extremely short. Time will seem to have added wings to his heels as well as his shoulders. Those have a short Lent, who owe money to be paid at Easter.
346 페이지 - One today is worth two tomorrows, as Poor Richard says; and further, Never leave that till tomorrow, which you can do today. If you were a servant, would you not be ashamed that a good master should catch you idle? Are you then your own master? Be ashamed to catch yourself idle...
349 페이지 - You expect they will be sold cheap, and perhaps they may for less than they cost ; but if you have no occasion for them they must be dear to you. Remember what Poor Richard says : Buy what thou hast no need of, and ere long thou shalt sell thy necessaries.
350 페이지 - Pride breakfasted with Plenty, dined with Poverty, and supped with Infamy.' And after all, of what use is this pride of appearance for which so much is risked, so much is suffered? It cannot promote health nor ease pain ; it makes no increase of merit in the person ; it creates envy ; it hastens misfortune.
347 페이지 - A little neglect may breed great mischief; for want of a nail the shoe was lost ; for want of a shoe the horse was lost ; and for want of a horse the rider was lost,' being overtaken and slain by the enemy ; all for want of a little care about a horse-shoe nail.
345 페이지 - He that hath a Trade hath an Estate, and He that hath a Calling hath an Office of Profit and Honor; but then the Trade must be worked at, and the Calling well followed, or neither the Estate, nor the Office, will enable us to pay our Taxes.— If we are industrious we shall never starve; for, as Poor Richard says, At the working Man's House Hunger looks in, but dares not enter.
349 페이지 - A ploughman on his legs is higher than a gentleman on his knees, as Poor Richard says. Perhaps they have had a small estate left them, which they knew not the getting of: they think, It is day, and will never be night; that a little to be spent out of so much is not worth minding ; but Always taking out of the mealtub, and never putting in, soon comes to the bottom, as Poor Richard says; and then, When the well is dry, they know the worth of water.

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