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Quantity. Soap.........

480, 546 pounds. Oil-seed ....

1, 810, 310 Cheese ..........

398, 116 Fish ..........

9, 058, 667 Hides, leather, and furs.....

7, 267, 940 Manufactures of leather.....

114, 726 Hemp and flax, raw..

120, 400 Hemp and flax, manufactured ..

2, 096, 562 " Cotton, raw.........

5, 857, 504 Cotton, manufactured......

2, 477, 729 Wool, raw ............

4, 214, 966 Wool, manufactured ..

806, 540 " Silk, raw.........

85, 514 « Silk, manufactured ....

576, 026 Grain ...............

4, 458, 847 bushels. Flour and pasta ........

48, 820 pounds. Lumber for furniture ......

1, 543, 900 " Wooden furniture....

27, 840 Mechanical and agricultural implements .....

305, 856 Iron ore........

1, 600 tons. Iron, pig .......

12, 133 Iron, manufactured ...

20, 854 " Copper and brass, crude ......

620 " Copper and brass, manufactured

458 Lead

3, 190
103, 800 pounds.

245, 648 tons. Earthenware and porcelain..

776 " Glassware .......

400 € Paper and books..........

280, 725 pounds. Fancy and fashionable goods...

366, 712 Tobacco ........

10,000 hogsheads. Imports not above enumerated .....

.......................

Value. $33, 600

79, 160 69, 600 395, 920 1, 706, 000

66, 860

31, 200 658, 130 1, 226, 920 1,971, 760 1, 278, 200 1, 035, 860

112, 120

519, 100 4,674, 000

2, 400 53, 070

1,730

Sulphur .........
Coal..........;

267, 370

2,810 109, 930 229, 620 98,000 82, 820 65,000

2,000 2, 362, 000

27, 780 27,000 51, 600

60, 000 2, 400, 000 3, 225, 000

Total ...........................................

Total .......

30, 950, 781

Duties were collected on the above imports to the amount of 12,604,324 francs, or $2,431,400.

Tabular statement showing the quantity and value of articles, in American dollars, exported from the port of Genoa during the year ended September 30, 1863.

Quantity.

Value Wine ..............

45,000 gallons. $25, 500 Olive oil........

182, 950 "

76, 830 Manna.......

78, 544 pounds.

98, 000 Candies and candied fruit.....

378, 544

22, 420 Chemicals .......

1,090, 432

98, 840 Soap and soda.

47,550

28, 000 Fruits ..........

632, 827

22, 320 1, 612, 131

59, 420 Cheese.............

485,000

63, 400 Hides and leather..

430,000

98, 900

Oil-seed

Hemp rope .......
Linen fabrics.....
Cotton .....
Silk and silk goods.
Grain. ............
Rice.............
Pasta ......
Charcoal and wood
Paper and books.....
Rags.......
Bones ...
Pig iron ...
Lead.......
Sulphur. .....
Gun stocks.....
Exports not enumerated....

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Total value.......................................

9, 350, 320

According to the foregoing statement the total imports for the last year were * nearly $31,000,000, and the exports less than $10,000,000. It should be carefully noted, however, that the lists do not embrace the transit movement within the port. Goods which are transhipped in the harbor for other ports of Italy, for the east, and for the western and northern ports of Europe, are not entered upon the custom-house books. There are also certain articles for America which are so transhipped. Rags from Naples and Sicily, and hides from South America, reshipped from our own ports, are examples of which cases have occurred within this year. The total amount of such transhipment is very large, and if added to the lists respectively, would swell the total of imports to 'sixty millions and the exports to thirty millions.

CUSTOMS DUTIES. For information upon the duties levied by the national government upon imports, I send herewith a copy of the tariff at present in force, and applicable to this port. It will be seen that a small duty is also collected upon certain exports.

Oils pay thirty cents per 100 kilogrammes ; arms of all sorts, one franc per 100 kilogrammes ; rags, (vegetable,) four francs per 100 kilogrammes; other substances, two francs per 100 kilogrammes; charcoal, one-half franc per 100 kilogrammes ;' firewood, ten centimés per 100 kilogrammés.

PORT CHARGES.

There is no change in the expenses of the port for shipping. The charge "are as follows: Anchorage, fifty centimes per ton ; sanitary visit, forty centime : per ton, if the vessel be from America or beyond the Cape of Good Hope; and from all other ports, twenty centimes per ton. For measuring the vessel, interpreter bill of health, &c., about thirty francs per' végsel. The most unpleasant charg is a duty collected by the city government upon all the ship's own provision consumed in port. To collect this duty the master of the vessel is required t furnish, on entry of his vessel, a list of the provisions then aboard. On hi departure he must furnish' a new list of the amount on hand. These two list being verified by a police visitation, the duties are levied upon the differenc If the master fails to enumerate every article he is liable to a fine. He is als

obliged to pay brokerage for the translating of the two lists, and this, with the ever-impending fine, aggravates ą tax which most shipmasters are disposed to regard as unjust. A movement has been for some time in progress to commute this city right into a tonnage duty, I hope that the change will not be much longer delayed.

PETROLEUM, During the year petroleum oil has been very generally introduced into this kingdom, and is gradually supplanting all other kinds of light for domestic uses. Four thousand five hundred barrels have been brought to this port direct from the United States. A large amount has also been imported by indirect transit. If the oil shall continue to be produced at a moderate cost, the demand from this kingdom will become very large.

LINE OF STEAMERS. To develop fully the direct trade between Genoa and the United States, a line of steamers is a prime necessity. This subject has engaged the attention of our merchants and consuls for many years. I have no new suggestions to make on the subject, unless it be that such line shall ply between some one Mediterra. nean port and New York or Boston. I do not know that this suggestion is new, but it must appear to any man familiar with steam navigation as of no ordinary importance. Most projects hitherto formed have contemplated a half dozen Italian ports, and of course great irregularity in the time tables, and greatly increased expense. I am unable to see why a monthly line each way between Genoa and New York, or Leghorn and New York, should not be a profitable enterprise.

SPEZIA-WILLIAM T. RIGE, Consul.

June 30, 1863. I have the honor to inform you that I have no returns to transmit to the department for the quarter now ended.

No changes have taken place as regards the port anchorage or pilotage regulations since 1861. They average combined about the sum of twenty cents per ton. No commercial regulation has been put in force which affects in any manner the commerce of the United States.

I herewith enclose returns of the imports and exports at this port of Spezia during the year 1862, (Nos. 1 and 2 ;) also a report of the arrivals and departures of vessels during the same year, (No. 3.) I regret not having been able to forward the said returns earlier, but I found it impossible to procure the necessary information before the present time.

I am bappy to state that the commerce of Spezia has shown a considerable increase since 1861; and that of 1863 will, in all probability, be almost double that of 1862. This circumstance is owing to the very extensive public works now being carried on at this place, i. e., the establishment of the royal arsenal ; that of two lines of railroad connecting this city on one side with Genoa, and on the other with Pisa and Florence. This latter line is almost completed, having been recently opened to Sarzana, a town about eight miles from Spezia, and within this consular jurisdiction. Numerous forts, also, are being erected for the protection of the harbor at the mouth of the bay. All these works, when completed, will be of infinite value to Spezia, whịch, owing to its position, must, in a few years, become one of the most important and largest seaports in the Mediterranean.

A contract has been made to extend and widen the city mole, in order that merchant vessels of all sizes may be enabled to come alongside and discharge their cargoes.

American commerce has decreased during the present year, but this is merely temporary, and owing to our country's distressing troubles. When, however, our vessels can once again compete, without drawback, with other nations for the carrying trade of the world, the preference always awarded our ships will be again manifest.

Statement showing the leading imports at the port of Spezia during 1862.

Articles.

Number, weight, Quantity. Value in or measure.

francs.

80

520 650

....do..

150

166 128 518 347 257 993

172

7,755 24, 825

Kilo......

40

....do..

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1,098 2, 142

447 3,236

526

680 1,330 21,651

125

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Tons.....

1,400

260 195, 530

665 5,384

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40

197 8, 290

Artificial flowers........

Kilo.. Brass and copper manufactures...

...do. Bronze and pewter.............................

....do.. DILumen..................... ..............

Bottles
Deo ............... ..................
Brandy..........................

Hectolitres
Black lead..........................

Tons .....
Butter.....
Books, printed and not printed..
Baskets ........

Number
Cheese............................

Kilo.
Chalk of every kind..
Carpets and quilts...............

....do..
Cotton manufactures ..............
Cigars........

Number... Charcoal.....

Kilo Clocks and watches...............

Number..
Coal and coke...............

Kilo.
Cocoa..........................
Coffee............

....do.. Cochineal...........

...do.. Chiccory.............

....do.. Chocolate............

..do.. Candles, stearine...............

..do..

.. do.. ISO................. ........................ Furniture....................

...do.. Fruit..............

....do.. Fibre for brushes..............................

...do..

Tons.........
Fossils, unenumerated.
Grain and flour of every kind.
Gum..................

Kilo...
Gold and silver plate..................

....do... Glassware and crystals.........................

....do... Hats................

Number ..
Hardware....................
India-rubber manufactures....
Iron, cast.....
Leather manufactures....
Linen......................
Lithographic stones.......
Looking-glasses....
Manuscripts........
Mineral waters .......
Molasses.....
Medicines.................
Meat................................
MUSICUT Unia Optical Instruments................ Number.
Marble, in quantity ......
Machines and engines....
Naval stores of overy description, free of entry .......
Olive oil.......

....... Kilo.....

266 5,003 2, 360 7,068

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10,000 191, 486

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180

1, 280

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779 1,338 5 430

100 5,430 1,010 3.613

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1, 108 2, 390 1,480

650 1,325 260,000

1,380

1,474 |

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Statement showing the leading exports from the port of Spezia during the year

1862.

Articles.

Number, weight, Quantity. Value in or measure.

francs.

...............

... Kilo.........

Furniture in quantity ...........
Grain ..................................
Marble and stone in quantity ........
Manganese...................................
Wood of every kind. ...........

Total amount .........

600

36 2, 370 8,500 32, 140

A

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43, 646

N. B.-A kilo is equal to 3 lbs. 2 oz. Italian, or 2 English.

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