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Whose kindness sent what does their malice seem
By lesser ills the greater to redeem ;
Nor can we this weak shower a tempest call,
But drops of heat that in the sunshine fall.
You have already wearied Fortune so,
She cannot farther be your friend or foe;
But sits all breathless, and admires to feel
A fate so weighty that it stops her wheel.
In all things else above our humble fate,
Your equal mind yet swells not into state,
But like some mountain in those happy isles,
Where in perpetual spring young Nature smiles,
Your greatness shows ;* no horror to affright,
But trees for shade and flowers to court the sight;
Sometimes the hill submits itself a while
In small descents, which do its height beguile;
And sometimes mounts, but so as billows play,
Whose rise not hinders but makes short our way.
Your brow, which does no fear of thunder know,
Sees rolling tempests vainly beat below;
And, like Olympus' top, the impression wears
Of love and friendship writ in former years.
Yet, unimpaired with labours or with time,
Your age but seems to a new youth to climb.
(Thus heavenly bodies do our time beget
And measure change, but share no part of it.)
And still it shall without a weight increase,
Like this New-year, whose motions never cease ;
For since the glorious course you have begun
Is led by Charles, as that is by the sun,
It must both weightless and immortal prove,
Because the centre of it is above.

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Show is an intransitive verb, and means appear, and is constantly so used in Dryden ; as among several instances in “Annus Mirabilis :"

" Like swans in long array his vessels show."-Stan. 66. Otherwise, the passage would read more pleasantly, if there were no stop after shows and the verb had an active meaning. There is a resemblance in this passage to Denham's description of Windsor in" Cooper's Hill:”

“ Windsor the next above the valley swells

Into my eye, and doth itsell present
With such an easy and unforced ascent
That no stipendious precipice denies
Access, no horror turns away our eyes ;
But such a rise as doth at once invite
A pleasure and a reverence from the sight."

VERSES

TO HER ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUCHESS,

ON THE MEMORABLE VICTORY GAINED BY THE DUKE AGAINST THE HOLLANDERS, JUNE 3, 1665,

AND ON HER JOURNEY AFTERWARDS INTO THE NORTH.'

10

MADAM,
WHEN for our sakes your hero you resigned
To swelling seas and every faithless wind,
When you released his courage and set free
A valour fatal to the enemy,
You lodged your country's cares within your breast, 5
The mansion where soft love should only rest,
And, ere our foes abroad were overcome,
The noblest conquest you had gained at home.
Ah, what concerns did both your souls divide !
Your honour gave us what your love denied :
And 'twas for him much easier to subdue
Those foes he fought with than to part from you.+
That glorious day, which two such navies saw
As each unmatched might to the world give law,
Neptune, yet doubtful whom he should obey, 15
Held to them both the trident of the sea :

The winds were hushed, the waves in ranks were cast
As awfully as when God's people past,
Those yet uncertain on whose sails to blow,
These where the wealth of nations ought to flow. 20
Then with the Duke your Highness ruled the day;
While all the brave did his command obey,
The fair and pious under you did pray.
How powerful are chaste vows! the wind and tide
You bribed to combat on the English side.

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lished before their apland was with the of the

Poetical Misafter Dryden's death York, who was

• These verses, addressed to the Duchess of York (the Duke of York's first wife, Anne, daughter of the Lord Chancellor Clarendon', and written towards the end of 1665, were probably not published before their appearance in the Preface to "Annus Mirabilis." See p. 42. The journey into the North of England was with the Duke of York in August and September 1665. This poem reappeared in 1704 in the fifth volume of the "Poetical Miscellanies," afterwards named "Miscellany Poems." being the first volume of the series published after Dryden's death

† War had been declared against the Dutch in February 1665. The Duke of York, who was Lord High Admiral, took the command of the fleet, and went to sea in the beginning of May On the 3rd of June he engaged with the Dutch fleet off the coast of Suffolk, near Lowestoft, and obtained a decided victory, showing great bravery in the battle.

I Scott has observed that sea, which in Dryden's poetry almost always rhymes with words like obey, way see line 43), &c. was probably pronounced suitably to such rhymes,

Thus to your much-loved lord you did convey
An unknown succour, sent the nearest way ;
New vigour to his wearied arms you brought
(So Moses was upheld while Israel sought, *)
While from afar we heard the cannon play,
Like distant thunder on a shiny day.t
For absent friends we were ashamed to fear
When we considered what you ventured there.
Ships, men, and arms our country might restore,
But such a leader could supply no more.
With generous thoughts of conquest he did burn,
Yet fought not more to vanquish than return.
Fortune and victory he did pursue
To bring them as his slaves to wait on you :
Thus beauty ravished the rewards of fame

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And the fair triumphed when the brave o'ercame.
Then, as you meant to spread another way
By land your conquests far as his by sea,
Leaving our southern clime, you marched along
The stubborn North, ten thousand Cupids strong. I 45
Like Commons, the nobility resort
In crowding heaps to fill your moving court :
To welcome your approach the vulgar run,
Like some new envoy from the distant sun,
And country beauties by their lovers go,
Blessing themselves and wondering at the show.
So, when the new-born phonix first is seen,
Her feathered subjects all adore their queen,
And while she makes her progress through the East,
From every grove her numerous train's increast; 55
Each poet of the air her glory sings,
And round him the pleased audience clap their wings.

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When Joshua fought with Amalek, Exodus xvii. 11-13. And it came to pass, when Moses held up his hand, that Israel prevailed: and when he let down his hand, Amalek prevailed. But Moses' hands were heavy: and they took a stone, and put it under him, and he sat thereon ; and Aaron and Hur stayed up his hands, the one on the one side, and the other on the other side : and his hands were steady until the going down of the sun. And Joshua discomfited Amalek and his people with the edge of the sword." Dryden uses the same illustration in “Britannia Rediviva," line 296.

+ The battle of June 3 was off the coast of Suffolk, near Lowestoft. A letter from the Earl of Arlington, Secretary of State, to the Lord Mayor, in the State Paper Office, giving the official news of the victory, mentions "the King having been in expectation ever since the guns were heard.' (Mrs. Green's Calendar of State Papers, 1664-5, p. 408.) Dryden refers in the opening of his ** Essay of Dramatic Poesy" to "that memorable day, in the first summer of the late war, whan our navy engaged the Dutch," and says: "The noise of the cannon from both navies reached our ears about the city, so that, all men being alarmed with it and in a dreadful suspense of the event which they knew was then deciding, every one went following the sound as his fancy led him."

1 The Duke of York was not permitted to go to sea again after his victory of June ; the fleet was left under command of the Earl of Sandwich. In August the Duke was sent by the King into Yorkshire, there being fears of a rising in the north His valour at sea and victory had made him very popular, and he and the Duchess were received throughout the journey with great honours.

ANNUS MIRABILIS :

THE YEAR OF WONDERS, 1666.

AN HISTORICAL POEM;

CONTAINING

THE PROGRESS AND VARIOUS SUCCESSES OF OUR NAVAL

WAR WITH HOLLAND
UNDER THE CONDUCT OF HIS HUGHNESS PRINCE RUPERT AND HIS GRACE

THE DUKE OF ALBEMARLE,
AND DESCRIBING THE FIRE OF LONDON.

“Multum interest res poscat, an homines latius imperare velint."

Trajan Imperator ad Plin. Plin. Epist. x. 33. “Urbs antiqua ruit, multos dominata per annos."-VIRG Æn, ii. 363.

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