Philippine Government: Development, Organization and Functions

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New York city, D. C. Heath, 1923 - 373페이지

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CHAPTER II
12
Morgas Description of the Native Government
13
Social Classes
16
The Native Laws
17
The Code of Calantiao
18
Judicial Procedure
20
Conclusion
22
CHAPTER III
24
Relations with Spain
25
The GovernorGeneral
26
Central Advisory Bodies
27
Central Administrative Agencies
28
Municipal Administration
29
The Judiciary
32
Ecclesiastical Administration
34
Public Finances
35
Commerce
37
Public Order
38
Judgment
42
CHAPTER IV
47
Causes of the Revolution of 1896
48
Desire for Independence
50
Renewal of the Revolution
52
Paternos Plan of Autonomy Under Spain
54
Establishment of the Revolutionary Government
55
Cabinets
56
The Revolutionary Congress
57
The Malolos Constitution
59
Constitutional Ideas of the Philippine Revolution
61
CHAPTER V
63
Determination to Retain the Philippines
64
Instructions to the Peace Commissioners
66
Differences Among the Peace Commissioners
68
The Protest of the Filipinos
70
The Treaty Ratification in the Senate
71
CHAPTER VI
72
The Schurman Commission
74
Accomplishments of the Military Government
76
The Negros Constitution
77
CHAPTER VII
79
The Second Philippine Commission
80
Civil Organization by the Commission
82
The Spooner Amendment
84
The Philippine Commission as a Legislative Body
86
Powers of the GovernorGeneral
87
The Executive Departments
88
CHAPTER VIII
89
Provincial SelfGovernment
90
Participation in the Central Government
91
Creation of the Philippine Assembly
92
Organization of the Assembly
94
Growth of the Speakers Power
95
Appointment of Majority of Filipinos in the Commission
96
The Jones Law
98
CHAPTER IX
100
Treaties of the United States
101
Orders of the President IO2 83 Acts of the Congress of the United States
102
Acts of the Philippine Commission and Legislature
104
Three Most Important Organic Laws
106
CHAPTER X
108
The VetoPower
110
CommanderinChief of the Militia and the Constabulary
112
Specific Functions of the GovernorGeneral
113
The ViceGovernor
114
CHAPTER XI
117
Reasons for the Reorganization of the Executive Depart ments 118 ments
118
Cabinet Responsibility to the Legislature
119
The Reorganized Departments I 20
120
Departmental Control I 22
122
The Executive Departments and the GovernorGeneral
123
UnderSecretaries
125
The Cabinet
127
CHAPTER XII
128
Need of a Common Counsel in the Philippines
129
Speaker Osmeñas Refusal of the Secretaryship of the In terior
130
Creation of the Council of State
133
Criticism of the Council of State
134
Powers of the Council of State
135
CHAPTER XIII
136
Legislative Privileges
138
Extent of Legislative Power
139
Specific Restrictions on the Legislative Power
140
Delegation of Legislative Powers
142
Restrictions as to Form of Legislation
143
Veto Power of the GovernorGeneral
144
The Philippine Senate
145
The House of Representatives
146
CHAPTER XIV
148
Appearance of Cabinet Members
149
Preparation of Bills
150
The Course of a Bill or Resolution
152
The Committee System
153
The Committee of the Whole House
154
The Parts of a Bill
156
Resolutions
157
Philippine Laws
158
CHAPTER XV
160
The Supreme Court of the United States
162
Decisions of the Supreme Court
163
Removal of Judges of First Instance
164
Municipal Court and Justice of the Peace Court of Manila
167
The Bureau of Justice
168
Income
183
Internal Revenue
185
Expenditures of the Philippine Government
187
The Debt of the Philippines
188
The Emergency Board
189
The Bureau of the Treasury
190
Philippine Money
191
CHAPTER XVII
192
Functions of the Department of the Interior
193
The Executive Bureau
194
The Bureau of NonChristian Tribes
196
The Philippine General Hospital
197
The Commissioner of Public Welfare
198
The Department of Public Instruction 175 Creation of the Department of Public Instruction
199
School Divisions
200
Local School Districts
201
Importance of Public Instruction
202
The Private Schools
203
The Quarantine Service
207
The Bureau of Forestry
209
The Bureau of Science
211
The Weather Bureau
212
The Bureau of Commerce and Industry
214
The Bureau of Public Works
215
The Bureau of Posts
216
The Bureau of Coast and Geodetic Survey
217
CHAPTER XVIII
218
The University of the Philippines
221
The Philippine Library and Museum
223
The Philippine Militia
224
The Philippine National Bank
225
Government Development Companies
226
CHAPTER XIX
227
The Philippine Bill of Rights
228
Rights Withheld from the Filipino People
230
Rights Classified Defined and Named
231
Civil Liberty Distinguished from License
232
Separation of Powers
234
The Rule of the Majority
235
Government Through Suffrage
236
Public Office is a Public Trust
238
Right to Local Government
239
Popular Sovereignty
240
Predominance of Civil Power Over Military Authority
242
Due Process of Law and Equal Protection of the Laws
244
Taxation
245
Freedom of Speech and of the Press
246
Right of Assembly and Petition
248
Obligations of the Philippine Citizen
249
CHAPTER XX
251
Early Philippine Political Parties
252
Origin of Present Political Parties
253
Party Organization in the Philippines
254
Elections
257
Disqualifications
258
The Board of Inspectors
259
Method of Voting
260
Canvass of Returns
261
Confirmation by the GovernorGeneral
263
Importance of Clean Elections
264
CHAPTER XXI
266
The Provincial Governor
267
The Provincial Board
268
Powers and Duties of the Provincial Board which do not Require the Approval of the Secretary of the Interior
269
Powers to be Exercised with the Approval of the Secretary of the Interior
272
Provincial Aid to Schools
273
The Provincial Budget
274
The Subprovinces
275
CHAPTER XXII
276
Salaries of Municipal Officers
277
The Municipal President
279
The Municipal VicePresident
280
Duties of a Councilor
281
Meetings of the Municipal Council
282
Mandatory Powers of the Council
283
Discretionary Powers of the Council
285
Aid for Municipal Schools
287
The Municipal Budget
288
Municipal Police
290
CHAPTER XXIII
292
The Municipal Board of Manila
294
General Powers of the Board
297
Municipal Administration
298
The City of Baguio
300
The Advisory Council
301
CHAPTER XXIV
302
The Provincial Governor
303
The Provincial Board
304
285 Provincial SecretaryTreasurer
306
Duties of the Municipal Officers
307
Municipal Districts
308
Schools Sanitation and Public Works
311
Emigration of Christian Filipinos
314
Moro Participation in the Legislature
315
The Status of the Philippines
318
The United States Army and Navy in the Philippines
324
The Jones Law
330
APPENDIX
341
Mission
350
Index
357
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65 페이지 - I walked the floor of the White House night after night until midnight; and I am not ashamed to tell you, gentlemen, that I went down on my knees and prayed Almighty God for light and guidance more than one night.
66 페이지 - Spain's was; and (4) that there was nothing left for us to do but to take them all, and to educate the Filipinos, and uplift and civilize and Christianize them, and, by God's grace, do the very best we could by them, as our fellowmen for whom Christ also died.
228 페이지 - That no person shall be held to answer for a criminal offense without due process of law; and no person for the same offense shall be twice put in jeopardy of punishment, nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself. That all persons shall before conviction be bailable by sufficient sureties, except for capital offenses.
318 페이지 - An Act to declare the purpose of the people of the United States as to the future political status of the. people of the Philippine Islands, and to provide a more autonomous government for those islands,
80 페이지 - In all the forms of government and administrative provisions which they are authorized to prescribe the Commission should bear in mind that the government which they are establishing is designed not for our satisfaction, or for the expression of our theoretical views, but for the happiness, peace, and prosperity of the people of the Philippine Islands...
343 페이지 - Cuba, and to secure in the island the establishment of a stable government capable of maintaining order and observing its international obligations, insuring peace and tranquillity and the security of its citizens as well as our own, and to use the military and naval forces of the United States as may be necessary for these purposes.
227 페이지 - At the same time the Commission should bear in mind, and the people of the islands should be made plainly to understand, that there are certain great principles of government which have been made the basis of our governmental system, which we deem essential to the rule of law and the maintenance of individual freedom...
140 페이지 - An ex post facto law is one which renders an act punishable in a manner in which it was not punishable when it was committed.
101 페이지 - Section 1. Neither slavery nor Involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. Sec. 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
84 페이지 - Until Congress shall provide for the government of such islands all the civil, judicial and military powers exercised by the officers of the existing government in said islands shall be vested in such person or persons and shall be exercised in such manner as the President of the United States shall direct; and the President shall have power to remove said officers and fill the vacancies so occasioned.

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